Jump to content


Garage Vehicles

Disney Pics 003.jpg

Jeep Wrangler (1992)

Owner: Megatron

Added: 27 September 2013 - 08:56 AM

20131023_113518.jpg

Dodge Ram 3500 (2006)

Owner: Megatron

Added: 25 September 2013 - 07:37 AM

6-inch XJ suspension lift (Lead).jpg

Jeep XJ Cherokee 4WD Sport 4-door (1999)

Owner: Moses Ludel

Added: 15 September 2013 - 01:16 PM

1988DodgeDakota.jpg

Dodge Dakota (1988)

Owner: biggman100

Added: 22 September 2013 - 05:22 PM

Forum Photos (2).jpg

Dodge Ram 3500 Cummins Quad-Cab 4x4 S...

Owner: Moses Ludel

Added: 15 September 2013 - 08:42 AM


Photo
- - - - -

Tent Trailer Ups and Downs

tent trailer tent trailering tent trailer accessories tent trailer camping trailer towing Jeep trailers tent trailer forum

  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 11:20 AM

For the lighter weight tow vehicle without a lot of horsepower, a tent trailer can be an excellent solution.  The compact SUV, a SWB Jeep 4x4, or even an AWD car* provides a sufficient platform for towing the typical tent trailer.

 

*Note: See my comments following biggman100's reply to this statement. He clarifies the weight of some modern tent trailers; I agree with him that an AWD car is surely not a candidate for the heavier tent trailers available! Always adhere to the vehicle manufacturer's tow rating, recommended trailers and the use of a factory recommended hitch!

 

Tent trailers are available with every kind of accessory, rivaling a travel trailer on a smaller scale.  Years ago, we tested a nice StarCraft tent trailer that had hot water, refrigerator, stove, a toilet and shower!  Sure, this wasn't Airstream caliber or size, but it did work—well!

 

On the downside, a tent trailer has some drawbacks. From a security standpoint, canvas is not even a slight deterrent to theft break-in or worse, and then there's the "bear syndrome".  Leave enough peanut butter, bread and honey scent around, and even some kinds of human scent, and the bears will visit.  Even the smallest black bear can rip a tent trailer to shreds in an effort to get a free meal!

 

Not that sheet metal trailers are a failsafe.  There are many stories about travel trailers, bed-mounted campers and bears.  I'll limit this to an Eastern Sierra, Buckeye Creek campground tale of recent times.  Bears out of the Yosemite Valley have found their way into the Bridgeport Valley/Twin Lakes region, and on a regular basis, they visit the campgrounds.  A friend who camped there said bears tore through the windows of cabover campers and travel trailers in an effort to reach foodstuff left out and wafting a scent.

 

So any trailer or a camper can be vulnerable, it's just that one swipe of a bear paw can rip apart a tent trailer wall.  (In Grizzly country, it takes just a few more "can opener" swings to open a sheet metal wall.)  Something to consider...And please, don't feed or encourage the bears, they're drawn to human food and garbage enough!

 

I have also used mini-tent trailers like the USA VenturCraft, even their tiny Sportsman model, on trails like the Rubicon.  You often see an M416 trailer doing this kind of duty...These units have no provision beyond stowage and a bed.  Their great advantage over tent camping is that the tent trailer places you off the ground and above any accumulation of frost, snow or streaming rain water—above the mice, chipmunks and squirrels, too! 

 

Another consideration with tent trailers is the setup time.  Even under the best of conditions, it takes from 20-30 minutes to set up the tent trailer.  Don't listen to the salesperson, ask them to demonstrate the "10-minute setup".  Who knows, maybe times have changed. 

 

We set up a tent trailer in a windstorm alongside Highway 50 at a camping spot.  Two kids under six years of age stood by watching two adults struggle with the canvas, tubing and braces.  It took an hour before we had a meal in front of us.  Had this been a sheet metal travel trailer, even in a windstorm, we would have walked through the entry sheet metal door and been cooking a meal within minutes...On that note, there are now tiny, lightweight travel trailers that can be towed readily. 

 

Would like to hear how tent and tent trailer camping works for you and your family! 

 

Moses



#2 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 03:06 PM

Moses, i agree with most of the points in this, except for one. Towing behind an AWD car, you have to be very careful, and due to limits in hitch design, and weight restraints, only the smallest and lightest trailers should be towed behind one. I myself, wouldn't recommend it, and, at least around here, most places that sell those kinds of trailers usually wont allow you to purchase one if the tow vehicle is an AWD car, such as Subaru's Impreza and Legacy. Crossover vehicles, such as the newer Subaru Outback, it depends on the make, model, and tow rating of the vehicle, as well as the hitch design and rating.

 

The reason for this is simple. Most AWD cars, the hitch is usually a lightweight, small drawbar, whereas most larger hitches, as most know, the drawbar is at least 2 inches, with some being as big as 3 inches on certain specialty hitches. Even the smallest tent campers can run upwards of 1500 LBS dry weight, and towing that behind an AWD car would be putting the hitch right at the limit of most smaller class 1 and class 2 hitches. I talked to several RV sales places around here, both new and used, because we are thinking of getting a tent trailer, and selling the tow behind, and most of them say that their most popular models, usually in the 5 to 8 person sleeping arrangements, start at around 2200 LBS dry.

 

I mentioned earlier today to a place i happened to stop at, that i wanted something i could not only tow behind the Dakota, but the 08 Subaru we just purchased, and the salesman was very adamant that they would not sell us anything over a very small, cramped 4 person trailer if we are using the car to tow it with. When we first started looking, i had mentioned using the old Subaru, and every place i talked to said they wouldn't even allow us to purchase a trailer from them, if that was our intended tow vehicle. After thinking about it, and talking to U-Haul about the hitch i intended to have installed, i realized that that car just didn't have the tow capacity, and the hitch wasn't strong enough, for anything much larger than a small utility trailer.

 

About your comment about set up time for a tent trailer, i would love to see someone set up my in laws in 10 minutes. It took them more than 30 minutes, and this wasn't the first time they have set it up. Another consideration is take down time, which, depending on how easily everything closes up, it can still take 30 to 60 minutes to get the trailer secured for towing.

 

About the bears, or any animal for that matter, that is the reason why they provide heavy steel storage lockers at the campsites we usually go to, and in places like the Adirondacks, they tell you not to leave any food or drinks in your sleeping area, as bears can be aggressive about getting to that stuff. It isn't only bears that can be aggressive either, as camps have been ransacked by wolves, ducks, and even squirrels and mice.



#3 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 04:18 PM

Excellent point to bring up, biggman100!  Adhering to the vehicle's towing capacity is a must, and the hitch design must work with both the chassis tow rating and the trailer's weight.

 

I made comments to that effect in describing a Durango that jackknifed with a tandem axle trailer in tow.  I not only agree with your comments, I will add, once again, that any short wheelbase and/or narrow track vehicle is a poor candidate for towing under the best of circumstances.  I simply avoid doing it.

 

The capper for me, from your comments, is the realization that some of these tent trailers can weigh 2000 pounds!!!  I was thinking well under 1,500 pounds, they must literally include the kitchen sink these days.  I totally agree that an AWD car is not a candidate for a 2000# trailer.  The trailer and vehicle must accept the correct hitch design, receiver size and ball size (as factory recommended).  Never pull a trailer weighing more than the vehicle's factory tow rating.

 

Summed up, always match the vehicle's factory tow rating to the trailer weight, and use a factory-recommended or approved trailer hitch.  Forget the idea of AWD cars pulling larger tent trailers.  Maybe an AWD car and something like the USA VenturCraft trailers would be okay.  Like the 505# curb weight Sportsman model that I pulled behind a Geo Tracker on the Rubicon Trail.  The USA VenturCraft Trailblazer was for our CJ-5 Jeep, and that trailer had a curb weight closer to 700#. 

 

Thanks, biggman100, for highlighting the weight of some current tent trailers.  I'll footnote my earlier comments and have readers pay attention to these additional points!

 

Moses



#4 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 04:32 PM

As to the different tow-behind trailers, whether it be a tent trailer or a self contained travel trailer, i am still on the fence as to which is better. Both offer advantages and disadvantages. A tent trailer can be towed easily, but takes time to set up, whereas a travel trailer, or even a drop in camper, are ready to go when you get to your destination, but require a heavier class of tow vehicle, and heavier hitches for the tow behind.

 

We have used both, many times over the years, and even spent 2 months in our 22 foot tow behind while we remodeled our floors in our house, and two major advantages i see there, are not only the security issue, but also the ability to stay out of the weather easier. im not saying a tent style is a bad choice in severe weather, as with a recent camping trip, we endured severe thunderstorms, and very heavy rain, and kept quite dry and comfortable in a tent trailer, but we had to take the time to zip the rain shields over the sides, whereas, in our tow behind, all i had to do was crank the windows shut.

 

What i tell most people who ask me which is better, is for them to see about renting one of each, not at the same time though, and take it even for a weekend, and see which is more to their liking and which suits them better. Around here, in central NY, and northern PA, you can rent everything from tent trailers, to tow behind camper's, to diesel pusher motor coaches.



#5 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 04:44 PM

I really like your idea about renting a trailer first, biggman100!  Again, both biggman100 and I emphasize that the trailer must be within the weight rating for your vehicle.  (See your vehicle owner's manual or discuss this with an authorized dealer for your brand truck or SUV.  Get answers in print.)  Use a factory rated hitch, ball size and safety gear as well.  If required, make sure you have the correct trailer brake controller. 

 

If you're not familiar with trailering, try to get the rental firm to demonstrate the use of the trailer behind your vehicle.  Trailering is an art, backing up a trailer is a craft, and if you learn to do both properly, you add a whole new dimension to your driving ability.  Be aware that trailering means allowing plenty of stopping distance, allow for added weight when accelerating under pressure (like passing), too.  Learn to keep the vehicle and trailer steady and stable.  Do not overreact to obstacles in the road, and avoid squirrely maneuvers that can cause loss of vehicle and trailer control.  In other words, slow down if necessary and pay attention!

 

A load distributing hitch is a must for larger trailers.  A sway control brake is very useful as well.  See comments in the trailering discussions at posts throughout this group category and its several forums!

 

Moses



#6 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 06:52 PM

If you look at Jay Co's line of "smaller" tent trailers, the dry weight ranges from 1200 to 1600 LBS, depending on how the unit is configured, which is in line with a lot of the manufacturers, but their dry weight is done before any accessories. It is interesting that you mention the kitchen sink, as even some of the small ones can be equipped with not only a sink, but refrigerator/freezer, small camp stove, power convertors and invertors, and even fresh water tanks, as well as associated plumbing and pump. When you figure out the weight of say a moderately equipped unit, with a sink, fridge/freezer, water tank, and pump and plumbing, and then add all the gear that most people carry for even a weekend, it doesn't seem too far fetched to see tent trailers that easily surpass the 2000 LB mark.

 

This is a quote from Wikipedia, "Basic popups usually include the following features: fold-down dinette (table top and bench seating combination), on-board fresh water tank, sink, 12-volt DC power system (including an AC to DC converter and a deep cycle battery), interior DC lighting, two sleeping bunks and storage cabinets. Many pop-ups also include a gas/electric absorption refrigerator, stove, rooftop air conditioner, propane furnace, water heater, electric water pump, exterior shower, skylight/roof vent, one or two propane tanks, electric or surge brakes, large storage trunk at the front of the box, and an awning. Some premium models also include a shower, toilet, waste water tanks, slide-out section (to increase interior space), microwave, and an oven."

 

One company that does try to make tent camping very economical, and as a result keep the trailer at a very light weight, is Sylvan Sport. They offer a couple different styles that the dry weight is an easily manageable 700 LBS, but they are a no frills, pretty much back to basics approach to camping. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that, because i see how it would work very well for some people, most people prefer to at least have some of the conveniences of home, even camping.

 

One thing i do want to clarify here, is that when you talk about tent style campers, there are actually 3 different styles. There is the basic tent camper, that is really a tent on wheels, then there is the flip out style, which is a tent style, but can also have additional "rooms", that attach off the sides of the camper, and then there is the "pop-up" type, that has a hard fiberglass roof, and the bedding area usually slides out and has cabinets, seating, and tables between the 2 bedding areas. because of all the different styles, that is why there is such a huge difference in the weights.



#7 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 August 2013 - 07:11 PM

I would also like to add to what Moses said about trailering. Even the lightest and smallest trailers, ones you wouldn't think would be an issue, can have disastrous consequences when not towed properly. I know this first hand because, in my late teens, my dad owned several rental houses, and i would go to the hardware stores and lumber stores with a 2 wheel drive, 1978 datsun pickup, to pick up supplies for him.

 

One trip, i knew i would either have to make 2 trips, or use my dads 4x6 homemade utility trailer, that weighed less than 300 LBS. empty. I decided to take the trailer, as it was raining and i didn't want to keep running back and forth. On the way to the lumber store, i guess i was going a bit too fast, or maybe the rain made the road slick, or both, but the trailer started to sway pretty violently, and not knowing better, i slammed on the brakes, causing the trailer to slide sideways, and as a result, slid the back of the truck sideways, and ended up with me parked sideways across both lanes.

 

Luckily, no one was injured, and nothing was damaged, although it did freak me out pretty badly. After that incident, my dad took me to an unused parking lot, and not only taught me how to react to what the trailer did, but also how to properly back up as well. I'm not saying im an expert, because i still have issues at times, especially backing up, but, i did learn a valuable lesson. So, whenever you are towing anything, from a small utility trailer to a big 5th wheel car trailer, or anything in between, always pay attention to what you are doing, and above all drive safe at all times.



#8 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 11 August 2013 - 09:06 PM

biggman100, you bring up a valid point.  There is no "driver's test" for non-commercial towing of lighter trailers in any state.  California, Nevada and other states have enacted "J-" and "R-" driver's license endorsements for large travel trailers over 10,000# GVWR and the use of double trailers like a fifth wheel behind the pickup and a boat trailer behind the 5th wheel.  This latter approach requires the same skill sets as a CDL driver behind the wheel of an 18-wheeler with doubles!  

 

In many states, though, there is no special license or endorsement requirement for a massive diesel pusher RV or a hefty travel trailer.  I know that many would be uncomfortable if they had to back a travel trailer through pylons or make a 90-degree perfect parking maneuver.  There could be a lot of resistance to the idea of licensure for recreational trailer pulling. 

 

Maybe, though, this could be handled tactfully like the Motorcycle Safety Foundation courses for motorcycle license endorsements.  In many states, the DMV recognizes the MSF safety course and training as bona fide proof of operator skill, exempting the licensee from taking a riding test on a figure 8 or more elaborate riding course at the DMV.

 

Many of us who understand the responsibility and skillsets required to keep a trailer safely in tow would be relieved to know that an owner has taken some kind of course to use a trailer up to, or over, 10,000# GVWR.  There could be a combination classroom and asphalt training like your father did in your case...Anything would help!

 

Moses



#9 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 12 August 2013 - 05:09 PM

NYS has proposed a trailer and towing license requirement a few times over the years, but it never seems to get made into a law, mainly because of the way vehicle laws get made and changed here. it usually, unfortunately, takes a family member of someone in the capital to be injured or killed before new laws are enacted. We don't even have school based driver's education in most of NYS anymore, which means new drivers are either taught mainly by parents or older siblings before they get their license.



#10 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 12 August 2013 - 11:09 PM

This is the trend nationwide, no in-school driver's training.  Many states require first time drivers to go through private courses or an online course and testing...It's all about cost, funding and the liability of driver training programs at the schools.

 

Moses



#11 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 13 August 2013 - 12:14 AM

I did a bit of research and found that there actually is a course on towing and trailers. I didn't look into it much, but it seems to be an online based course, but even that would be a help for someone who wants to learn a bit more about towing and trailering. The website is http://fleet.idrives...g-training.html.

 

Another site i found, that at least offers a bunch of valid tips, is from U-Haul. That site is: http://www.uhaul.com...er-Instructions



#12 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 13 August 2013 - 02:15 PM

This is very valuable to members, biggman100, whether they are novice trailer users or veterans wanting to compare their technique with accepted industry practices.  Thanks for seeking out these links and sharing them with the members—that's community!

 

Moses



#13 RareCJ8

RareCJ8

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:27 AM

Here is my 81 CJ8 with tent trailer in tow.  This combo gets used often and with great joy!

 

homestead2012003-Copy_zpsaed4343d.jpg


VCMontanaandScramble2013277_zps6b71c866.


#14 RareCJ8

RareCJ8

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:55 AM

And here is the tent deployed!

 

 

hilospokerrun2013parttwo024_zpsa83a7e74.

 

 

hilospokerrun2013parttwo001_zps47bcc169.


VCMontanaandScramble2013277_zps6b71c866.


#15 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 22 August 2013 - 11:15 AM

Great tent!  This is on a military trailer platform...RareCJ8, please comment about the trailer...I think it's fantastic on the Rubicon Trail and elsewhere, the real deal!



#16 RareCJ8

RareCJ8

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 22 August 2013 - 12:20 PM

Thank you!  Despite its appearance, not military.  Started out as an unnamed canvas tent camper from the 70s.  two sliding-out beds and a very small rear access hatch.  When I acquired it 10 years, the axle was a toyota front end.  the PO is a toyota guy and the trailer could then carry a spare front end, steering links, etc etc.  for many years it was a trash/utility trailer.

 

Global plan was to sell the Venturecraft pop up and build this current trailer.  the tent top is easily removed using  pin/bushing  assembly.  it is completely coated in rhino lining to match jeep color.

 

I ditched all that in favor of a 3000# straight axle from a local supplier and added the 8 lug spindles.  It wears 37" tires and H2 wheels to match jeep.    It used to be single wall tub, but we skinned the interior with aluminum diamond plate to prevent exterior skin from dents, etc.     Added the military-style hoops on the rear corners and also round LED lights.

 

the leaf springs are still toyota w/ factory hangers.  Gabriel shocks and day star bump stops.  True to its adopted roots, the tail gate is from a 70s era toyota hi lux.  

 

the front tongue is a piece of receiver tube, so i can mix/match different hitch options, whether a Treg, pintle/lunette or pull it clean and insert a lock bar for theft prevention.  

 

immediate plans are to add a battery/inverter box for on-board trailer power to run LED interior and exterior camp lights.  Charge will come via the 7 round trailer power plug.

 

It trailers like a dream.  a bit long and offers some challenges on tight trails.  bed ID is 4'x7'.  added numerous floor/interior and external gear tie downs.  The interior tie downs keep gear from migrating about inside the tub.

 

For non tent camp options, the modular design allows installation of a 7' roof rack and up front a removable fuel tray-- holding 4 fuel/water cans and a 5 gal propane tank.  An now using exclusively Scepter MFCs.  No more rusty metal gas cans.  

 

leaf spring R&R, etc.

 

DSC02520.jpg

 

 

And a trivia question:  in the below pic, what is the purpose of the electric winches?

 

DSC07674.jpg

uses BAL style leveling jacks. got the HD option.  Use a cordless impact gun and deploys these fast.  Strong enough to lift both rear tires off ground.

 

trailerjacks018.jpg

 

 

 

detail of tent support structure.

 

IMG_6014.jpg

 

before rhino coating, but in expedition mode

 

IMG_4309.jpg

 

IMG_4310.jpg

 

 

 

The tent itself was made in Australia and is far superior to the others we explored.  Roomy, weather proof and easy to set up. It's the 'pup' model.   they are now sold here by 3 dog camping USA.


VCMontanaandScramble2013277_zps6b71c866.


#17 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 22 August 2013 - 01:14 PM

RareCJ8, this is an incredible, innovative trailer, thanks for the in-depth tour and description of the various components and the tent, which others should find of real value.  Talk about trail tested products!

 

I've had the pleasure of following this trailer on a tight, twisty, high ground clearance trail, coming out of Camp Wamp after transporting kids with disabilities to the camp—RareCJ8 brought a full load of gear into the camp before we took the Gold Lake Trail "shortcut" (i.e., rock pile) back to civilization...

 

He tugged the trailer through major rocks with the stroker 4.6L-powered CJ8 Scrambler, and this outfit also does duty on the Rubicon Trail, Fordyce, Blue Lakes and other Sierra trails!  Both the Scrambler and the trailer are excellent examples of trail-prepped equipment, purpose built and continually improved upon for severe duty use.

 

Anyone guessed what the winches are doing at a Chevron station?

 

Moses



#18 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 22 August 2013 - 06:35 PM

A guess on the winches: They are used to haul workers and spare parts, such as light bulbs, up to the roof?

 

Rarecj8, that is a really neat idea for a camping trailer and doesn't look like it would be hard to build. A couple questions, though. First what is the overall weight? And second, how long does it take on average to set up the tent?



#19 RareCJ8

RareCJ8

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 80 posts

Posted 27 August 2013 - 01:27 PM

weight?  no idea.  maybe some day i can get to a CAT scales and find out.   setting up the tent, awning, etc takes about 30 minutes to dial it all in.  About the same to load up, although a bit faster.

 

Those winches are located at the Donner Road exit at west Truckee, CA.  Last gas before going west over the summit.  My bet is they were/are used to quickly install tire chains on vehicles in winter.  lift rear bumper and sling away...   And Its all nice and covered from the wx.   VERY beefy design and each has a controller box near the pumps.

 

moses?


VCMontanaandScramble2013277_zps6b71c866.


#20 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 27 August 2013 - 02:24 PM

That sounds feasible, the bumper lift, though it would be limited to vehicles that have a very stout and flat bumper—without a plastic cover like so many cars and SUVs have today...This really is worth exploring!  A phone call to that Chevron Station warranted?

 

Moses



#21 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 28 August 2013 - 01:41 AM

Rarecj8, that would make sense as to the purpose of the winches. I was born and raised in southern California/Nevada/New Mexico/Texas, and traveled to Washington state frequently from New Mexico in my late teens (albeit by the most scenic routes i could find), and i remember there being signs on Donner pass about chains being required in winter.

 

As for your tent trailer, my wife saw that, and now she is after me to see about either finding or building one. Those aren't as popular on this side of the country as they seem to be out your way, and as a result, aren't as easy to find. May warrant a trip out west or down south after i sell the tow behind, if i cant find one on this side of the country. Around here, pop up style are more prevalent and much more readily available.



#22 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,065 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 28 August 2013 - 09:24 PM

Biggman100, I've joined RareCJ8 and his trailer on the trail, and it is purpose built for ground clearance.  The trailer, like the CJ-8, is a "rock crawler", and this trailer gets toted into rough, rocky country.  Not sure whether you subject vehicles and trailers to challenges like this in the Northeast.  RareCJ8's Scrambler lives a rugged life out here—and so does the trailer!

 

That said, the track width on the trailer is wide, which helps with cornering stability and side-slope center of gravity, a must for the places RareCJ8 goes.  Also, hitch design is everything in this driving environment, and a conventional ball hitch can, of itself, cause a trailer to flip over on rocky, off-camber terrain. 

 

Moses



#23 biggman100

biggman100

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 230 posts
  • LocationNew York
Garage View Garage

Posted 29 August 2013 - 06:28 PM

I don't actually subject my vehicles to anything as extreme as you guys do, so i wouldn't need the ground clearance that his has, but the width would still be beneficial for stability on the road. My thoughts about a set up like his were more along the lines of, depending mainly on the weight factor, something we could take when we go camping that we could tow behind the Subaru, and in turn save a bit of fuel over taking the truck. But that would come down to overall weight, stability on the road, how easily it pulls, things like that. My other thought was that we could tow something like that behind the car, and tow the boat or the jet skis behind the truck. As it stands now, i either have to make 2 trips when we go camping, or leave the jet skis and boat home, so im always looking at feasible ideas to make things easier.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: tent trailer, tent trailering, tent trailer accessories, tent trailer camping, trailer towing, Jeep trailers, tent trailer forum

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users