Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Moses Ludel

    4.2L Re-build 77 CJ-7 Project

    Nice work, Stuart...Did you polish the crankshaft? Looks good...No regrind and balance? Inline sixes are very tolerant of balance, OEM cranks and flywheels generally do not create an issue. I usually grind 0.010"/0.010" undersize and balance the reciprocating parts. Match weighting helps, too. Not sure if any of this is in your plan... I'll look through my OEM Mopar parts for the 4.2L projects. I may have a valve retainer. The original part number is J3173225. The number may have been updated later by Mopar. Moses
  3. Moses Ludel

    Corvair Aircraft Engine Conversion

    Hi, Stuart...Glad you got the Finch book, he did a real service here, making welding accessible to many. The read is easy, the facts are confidence inspiring. A great book! You'll have more flame stability with the 2-stage system. When bottle gas drops down, you won't be fiddling as much with the flame... Best regards, Moses
  4. I have begun the rebuilding of the 4.2 engine from my 77 CJ-7 barn find project. My local NAPA store in Buckeye, AZ has a reputable engine shop attached and run by an family friend of my wife. Its good to have friends with years of experience to help. I opted for NAPA's deluxe master rebuild kit which is a good value when you get it all at once. I was pleased with how clean the hot tank process got my dirty block and sheet metal. I had given up on scrubbing and even the pressure washer didn't work well. After taking measurements it was decided to go with the .030 re-bore. My sharp eyed engine man noticed that the oil bypass valve retainer had damage to the shoulder that fits into the block for alignment. I think I understand how this valve works and felt this damage would compromise the integrity of the valve. I am not sure how the damage occurred other than forces applied during removal or installation. Luckily there is a good bit of info about the valve in my Jeep CJ re-builders manual by Moses Ludel. A trip to my local AMC junk yard did not yield one. I'm not sure if this part is still stocked anywhere. I decided to see what I could do with my MIG welder and I think I succeed but I would still use a new or salvage one if I can find it. Next I installed the nice brass plugs that come with the kit and the oil passage plugs. The new cam is standard OEM grind and fit nicely into the new bearings installed by my shop. I'm not sure exactly what holds the cam in place on this 77 vintage engine. Chain? Lifters? Distributor? All three? My engine does not have the spring and Pin thing on the timing cover that Ive heard about on later engines. My jeep project had signs of good regular care by one owner. My crankshaft was still within specs for a polish only and standard bearings. The crankshaft is now installed after verifying still in specs on oil clearance with plasti-gauge.
  5. Stuart_Snow

    Corvair Aircraft Engine Conversion

    I haven't had time to figure out what the transmission is but It has an overdrive. I'm not familiar with the Getrag but my I was able to get 200K of service from the 46RE on my 97 Dodge Ram with a few tweaks. I've completed a full service on the 93 and have discovered a rear main seal leak which I'm not surprised considering its age and lack of regular driving. I'll try to make a thread in the Cummins forum. No they are not. Mine are old medium duty hand-me-downs. Its time for me to invest in some good modern 2 stage units. Good News! I ordered the latest version of Finch's book. Its already arrived an I love it. This is really going to help improve my welding. A lot of good data in here and I've already found some things I'm doing wrong like running my Oxygen pressures too high.
  6. Yesterday
  7. Last week
  8. Earlier
  9. Speed...Sounds logical on the master cylinder bypassing and leaking into the booster. No visible leaks? Where else could it go? At the magazine, I did a lengthy series on forming and flaring brake tubing. If you plan to build from scratch, you'll find that insight useful: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/video-series-how-to-flare-automotive-brake-tube-fuel-lines-and-cooler-tubing/ Moses
  10. Here's my LATEST challenge. The Yota has no brakes. They've acted "peculiar" since I got this rolling wreck,but NOW they're just flatlined.I've installed new calipers,brake pads,and master cylinder a few months ago,I knew at that time the rear brakes were fubarred due to leaky axle seals-they worked fine around town,but after 20 miles of highway,the rear brakes would drag the truck down to a stop. Bleed a brake line of some fluid at the master cylinder and it was good to go for a few more miles. I adjusted the shoes as loose as they'd go,and shortened the master cylinder push-rod as short as it could go,THEN the brakes worked FINE for almost a year. Then I started losing fluid,but could find NO leaks. Simple,right? Master cylinder leaking into the booster. If it is,it's going straight through the vacuum hose,into the engine's cylinders. But usually I can smell burning brake fluid in the exhaust,but not here. If fluid is pooling in the booster,there's likely over a gallon in there by now. I'm thinking I'll gather new everything and go through the brakes (and rear axle seals) from one end to the other. Without replacing brake lines,I can get everything else I need for around $100.00,not sure about brake lines. That part of the job could be costly,metric lines and all. Thought about putting the big GMC back on the road,but it'd cost me around $70.00 to transfer plates and insurance. Speed
  11. In this era of audio-visual learning, I have been building an instructional library at Vimeo On Demand, the best use of my time and a worthwhile means for serving the needs of 4x4 light truck owners. This exchange with a thoughtful forum Member characterizes a choice that many consumers make today: 6-11-2018 Forum Member Question: Should I? '"I would like to first off apologize for burdening you with this question, but I have read a lot of your stuff and feel you would be the man to talk to about this particular topic. I understand you are a firm promoter of the restoration of vehicles and know which vehicles are worth restoring. I have a 1979 GMC K 2500 that has 185,000 km's on it. I am the second owner of the truck, after my great uncle passed away and left it to me. The original engine is in decent shape and it runs well, but it could use a tune up. The body is in rough shape with rust around the wells and a nice dent in the door. I used it for a few years until I saved up enough money to buy something newer, and it has since set in my back yard waiting for the time when I can restore it with my son. Isn't that always the story? All that aside, I will get to my predicament. My wife is in full clean up mode after our recent decision to move and my truck was the first on the chopping block. Reluctantly , I came to grips with letting go of this truck as I am just starting my career and don’t have the time or money at the moment, so she posted it online for $1,750. Within an hour she had 50 people calling wanting to buy it, one of which was willing to drive over 1,000 km's to pick it up! This made us think that the truck may be worth holding onto, instead of letting go because it is inconvenient to keep at the moment. After spending a few days researching costs and the like, I have a good idea of how much it will cost to restore and the amount of time required to do so. I am willing and able to do the work, but I wanted to see if it was actually a truck worth restoring or if I should capitalize on the interest now and then pick another up later when I have the time. Of course, this is taking all the sentimental value out of the machine, but you get what I mean. I am sure you know better than most, it is a hard decision to financially commit to a project like this. Especially, if you are like me and have to do everything right and easily develop an obsession about ensuring that the project is seen through right to the end...Dune Wolf" Moses Ludel's Reply: Dune...First off, this truck is in the cohort of the best G.M. light trucks ever built. 1971-79 K2500 trucks have superior equipment and engineering to any model ever assembled. They drive well and live up to all expectations. They are readily serviceable and rugged, with the best axles, transfer case, power steering and chassis in the industry—then or today. If the truck has a manual transmission and NP205 gear drive transfer case, it would be my top pick for a 3/4-ton 4x4 pickup. The Turbo 350 is livable but not as stout as a THM400, a choice G.M. made for all light 4x4s except the somewhat rarer K3500 SRW and dually trucks. A THM350 is a relatively simple transmission to rebuild. That said, the truck is not "new" and does need the work you describe. As for mileage, we bought an immaculate 1987 K2500 4x4 Suburban at 160,000 miles that had a documented G.M. crate motor installed at 160K. We sold the vehicle to a friend at 180,000 miles, and the Suburban is still running well at over 300,000 miles with the use of Mobil 1 engine oil. Without romanticizing, these trucks are simply better built than all others. Period. Another anecdote: We had a 1987 Jeep Grand Wagoneer that wife Donna loved to drive, I kept it to my high standards of preventive care and service, it was a wonderful vehicle. We got a "hair" to trade the Jeep on a new Liberty in 2002. The dealership nearly begged us to not force a trade-in and reluctantly gave us a $1500 allowance. (We paid $6500 for the FSJ gem three years prior.) That vehicle/model has since become a cult classic. Ours would sell today for $15,000. A big lesson... The choice is yours. If you either do your own work or can have access to a reliable shop for restorative work, compare your great uncle's 2-owner vehicle with today's complex G.M. or other trucks that are extremely expensive to service and nearly impossible to fix. Try a Duramax with a cab and front clip removal to replace the turbocharger. Or maybe a new Ford F150 with the 3.5L twin-turbo V-6 certain to fail under load. The Ford 6.0L and 6.4L diesels have cost owners tens of thousands in major repairs. As a footnote, there is not a single electronic module in that '79 G.M. truck. The ignition module and radio are the only "electronic" devices. My 50-plus years of professional skill at wrenching have been a major coup. I have a wedge against inflation and no compulsion to invest in new vehicles that depreciate like a rock. The replacement for our 2005 Ram Cummins 4x4 is now priced at over $70K MSRP. We may never buy another new vehicle as a matter of principle. In this era of audio-visual learning, I am shifting from print media to creating a video library at Vimeo On Demand that will meet 4x4 light truck consumer needs. The aim is to produce HD videos that raise the competency of DIY techs, guys and gals willing to buy a truck like your prized '79 K2500 4x4 and restore it to ultra-reliable condition. A $12000-$20,000 investment in your truck would be worth every single dime. Sublet the body and paint to a highly competent shop that can eliminate rust issues; reupholster the seat and restore the interior; perform any mechanical work needed. Do the work to factory workshop standards and restore the truck to its original condition. Snag a copy of my Chevrolet & GMC Light Truck Owner's Bible® (Bentley Publishers, available at Amazon, Advance Adapters or from Bentley), you'll see how much I appreciate your truck...That book was written with your truck clearly in mind. Great armchair reading in your wintertime. Best regards, Moses
  12. Moses Ludel

    Corvair Aircraft Engine Conversion

    Stuart...Congratulations on your daughter's wedding! Also, there's nothing like the North Rim, we have approached from Nevada via Jacob Lake. Spectacular country...See below:
  13. Stuart_Snow

    Corvair Aircraft Engine Conversion

    Moses, May was a busy Month with a daughters wedding and a trip to the Kaibab National Forest on the North Side of the Grand canyon. Both events were a delight. I was able to tow the CJ-3B on the trip with a new addition to my Mopar fleet. A 93 Dodge Ram 250 club cab 5.9 Cummins. It has the poor mans dually conversion and has 50,000 miles. It belonged to my Father -in law and wasn't driven often. I'll have to read through the Cummins forum to get up to speed on this early generation of the 5.9. Exploring the Kaibab with the CJ-3B has been a dream for many years. Conditions were dusty but I saw some great country and wildlife and the Jeep comes alive going down old narrow trails. I share your enthusiasm for the Merlin v-12 and P-51. Nothing sounds better than a Mustang on a high speed pass. Corvair powered planes have the unique growling sound of a 6 cylinder boxer engine but not quite as impressive as the mustang. I've always wanted to go to Reno but have not made it yet. This will be my first year for going to OshKosh in August. Work on my Corvair powered aircraft continues. I have been working on the Elevator bell-crank assembly and was doing some welding today. I struggled a little as I was trying to weld dissimilar size material. I think I need better regulators as I'm constantly adjusting my flame setting. I will look for Richard Finches book and also check out the Cleveland tools site. Some more good news is my 4.2 block from my 77 CJ7 project is back from the machine shop and all the new parts. I cant wait to start working on that. I started flying back in 96 and most of it has been in Cessna's. The open cockpit Pietenpol will be a real throwback to the old days of flying. She is a good honest flying ship with no surprises but it is a tail dragger and its a light weight and high drag machine which bears watching in the energy management department. Stuart
  14. Sounds like a plan, Speed...Curious how this works out. Slow but it will get there, right? Do you go up through Mountain City to Idaho? Lots of climbing out of Elko! Moses
  15. Hi, Speed! See my comments below...
  16. It LOOKS to be in decent shape,so I don't think it has a lot of miles on it. not banged up,usual issues aside from the engine-brakes,tires,glass seals,little rust,etc. Since it was used only for setting power poles in town,I'd be surprised if it has 100K on it. UPDATE-06-06-2018 My '54 GMC is likely to get only a little upgrading;.I have an OEM radio for it I need to have rebuilt,if I can find anyone who can do it. I'm also needing to replace the rear section of my drive shaft as its yoke is worn out. I SHOULD replace the clutch,but probably will wait until it gets enough chatter to shake the mirrors out of adjustment. The engine could stand a rings-n-bearings job,but that'll have to wait until I have some money to invest. I'm going to revisit using the truck to haul scrap metal to the scrap recyclers in Southern Idaho and Northern Utah,since Pacific Steel is paying considerably less than anywhere else I could go. I figure my 2 Ton can haul enough to make the trip profitable for me. Speed
  17. Parts or builder-Needs all glass,replaced front group,brake work,2 wheels and 4 tires and misc. hoses etc from the engine. Has 4.0/automatic,AWD-working on getting the Title,was running/driving until a tire went flat,truck was vandalized where it was down while owner was getting the tire fixed and installed. CALL Speed-775-934-4760 SOLD!!!
  18. Hi all; I'm giving thought to ANOTHER '82 Toyota 4X4 pick up. It's in pretty nice condition except for the front fenders,but even those are way better than the ones on my rolling wreck. I can get it for $500.00 relatively complete. All that's missing is both axles-the springs are still there,it runs and was functional and operable before the owner pulled both axles to rebuild for his 4Runner. Here's what I'm considering-I'll have access this Summer to an '88 Jeep Comanche that was rolled,and I'm looking at swapping its axles under the Toyota. I expect they'll be too wide,and the spring spacing will be off,but I feel like it could still work. The springs under the Toyota are a 4 inch lift,so that might leave enough room for tire clearance with wider axles. Haven't looked into this very deeply yet,mostly wanted to see if anyone out there has done this before. It'll have taller gearing so it'd be a good truck for longer drives and highway use,and the Rolling Wreck will still be a solid work truck. (I also located a 2WD Toyota truck that has the SR5 trim and the dash with Tachometer,it runs and drives but has no title,so I'd have to drive it to Sparks and get that handled,then it'd be a parts truck,mainly the cab and front group for the wreck,and possibly the engine-I'd have to check the compression etc. to decide that. That's a lot of work,but it'd pay off in the long run. The rolling wreck is down while I get the brakes to work again. (The Cops are really tweaky about brakes for some reason...) I have a '92 Grand Cherokee now that was vandalized,I'll sell it for around $450.00 or so;no glass,front group ravaged,no front wheels/tires flat tires on the rear, has the 4.0 inliner/automatic and AWD,roof rack and receiver hitch,pretty nice interior but the dash was hurt a little when the stereo was stolen. I'm currently working on getting the Title and Bill o'Sale from the owner. Selling this will pay my Gas-n-Electric this month. I know this isn't the place for selling things,but... Speed
  19. Moses Ludel

    How about Toyota Highlanders?

    It would be worth Google-ing the traction control issue, I'm sure others have experienced it, too. There may be a Toyota update or remedy. I would discuss the traction control system with your local dealership's service manager, he or she may have insight...Look to Consumer Report and possible NHTSA recalls related to the traction control.
  20. Price will be going down. There is question as to whether or not it can be used as is. It does run and drive, I drove it about 6 miles total today to have a competent (Mostly anyway) mechanic look at it prior to a sale. We will come up with a decent price always open to reasonable negotiation.
  21. BadDriver4x4

    How about Toyota Highlanders?

    It's been a few months since I purchased my Highlander and I have a short term report to make. The vehicle is definitely capable in the snow. It would have been nice to have had more aggressive tires on it during the snow covered months. We got plenty of the cold white stuff this year and at one point I had to plow through a pile of snow left on the road by town road crews that were obviously having problems with the distribution of the fluffy white rain. I have to say that as much as the traction control \ 4wd helps to get you going I find that there is a tendency to lock out power in a skid or slide. It felt as though I had no power at the wheels while trying to negotiate a turn and going into a slide. This really bothers me because I'm used to full control and a loss of power takes away the option to power out of a slide. I'd need to read up on this situation to see if my vehicle model or year has a problem with this particular maneuver, but I can't find a Haynes or Chilton manual for the Highlander anywhere in my area. I like to look at a repair manual when I can, so I will look online when I have exhausted the parts dealers I frequent. (Not on a daily basis ;) ) There are some other quirks and issues that may belong only to my vehicle so I won't expound on them at this point. I guess at this point I'm more happy than bothered with this choice. It did come down to money and availability, so I can't say that I wouldn't have prefered another vehicle with a better 4wd pedigree, but the dealer had to do some serious repairs to it and the price was getting out of out hand for our comfort zone for a local vehicle. (Rusty or worse) At this point the reliability and features sure outweigh any pet peeve issues.
  22. I'm pleased to hear this and certain that those close to the project are happy as well...Glad this worked out, Jeepdog! Keep us posted!
  23. Thank you for all your help! Next on the list is some body work and paint.
  24. No need to be embarrassed! This has been a real learning experience...Yes, and you're now expert on the T4/T5 transmission rebuild, too! Many engines have solid dowel pins in the block or bellhousing. The AMC engines have hollow pins that align the block and bellhousing; these hollow dowels also provide a bore for bolts to pass through. These bolts are vital when you consider the bellhousing-to-block bolt count. I'm very glad you resolved the issue, that's what matters! Noise with the floor pan out is always amplified. If you hear nothing with the cover in place, there's likely nothing wrong. (Carpet or floor mats add even more muting.) You were probably listening to normal noise of the transfer case gears and/or transmission gear sets. You have no other reason to suspect trouble after the conscientious work that you performed. Correct gear lube can make a difference when it comes to transmission/transfer case noise. The Dana 300 requires EP gear lubricant while the T4 transmission calls for ATF. I'm not a big fan of ATF in manual gearboxes, and we can discuss that further. For now, get some miles on that Jeep! Be sure everything works well and reliably, then have some fun! Moses
  25. Well here's where I'm at. I am really embarrassed and hate to admit it but somehow I left out the 2 bellhousing bolts that go through the dowel pins and into the lower holes on the engine (The ears that stick out). I don't know where they went or why i didn't notice. I threw in some new bolts and of course that's the cause of the bellhousing flex. All that chatter is also gone. There is some noise also with the clutch in and trans is in gear while coasting. . Sounds like rotating gears. Maybe normal gears turning noise? Coasting while in gear the rear wheels are spinning the driveshaft through the tcase and then causing all the gears in the transmission to spin. Also I've been driving it with the tunnel cover and boots off. I put them on and can't really hear it. What do you think? I can get a video of it later. I'm still in shock. I can't believe I went through all this over 2 bolts. I guess one positive is I can rebuild a t4 with my eyes closed.
  26. BubbaQ1...Your CJ-7 is very nice! Although other reasons might dictate a later vehicle choice, you have an AMC/Jeep model that is prized by Jeep buffs—myself included...Let's begin with the assets of a 1985 Jeep CJ-7 and go from there: 1) Substantial, proven chassis, disc front brakes, Saginaw steering (power in your case?) and easy repair access. 2) Proven, rugged powertrain with the 4.2L inline six, a Dana 300 helical gear transfer case, an open-knuckle Dana 30 front axle and AMC Model 20 rear axle. 3) Fundamental electrical system, easier access and minimal electronics (only related to emissions and the engine). 4) Classic body tub styling with a quality hard top. Great accessories access for seats, armor, a winch and such. Whether you leave the vehicle stock or modify it, these are the upgrades needed for a stock vehicle: 1) Upgrade front wheel hubs to accept 6-bolt free-wheeling hubs; 5-bolt freewheeling hubs are weaker and tend to loosen and shear the bolts. Parts readily available for this upgrade. 2) The BBD carburetor is livable if blueprint rebuilt as I share at the magazine. Many benefit from an EFI conversion, either Mopar EFI or Howell TBI. This is a strong consideration, I've covered both approaches at the magazine and in books. Mopar EFI has been discussed and illustrated in my Jeep Owner's Bible and the Jeep CJ Rebuilder's Manual: 1972-86. The Rebuilder's Manual would be a handy book for your CJ Jeep work and plans. The prototype vehicle for that book was much like your Jeep CJ-7. 3) One-piece rear axle shafts are often discussed. They can be beneficial, especially with ultra-large tires. Your tires are not grossly oversized, you can "get by" with torquing the rear axle shaft nuts to factory specification and method. I discuss this in my Jeep CJ Rebuilder's Manual: 1972-86 and also at several AMC Model 20 discussions right here at the forums. (Use the search box keywords for the AMC Model 20.) 4) A heavy-duty transmission upgrade like 60Bubba's Warner T19 conversion covered here at the forums, an NV4500 like I illustrate in my Rebuilder's Manual or other options would each be considerations. The T4/T5 will need a rebuild at some point, these are not heavy-duty units. You have what appears to be a very clean and tastefully/mildly modified and upgraded CJ-7. I'm really drawn to these vehicles, they are rugged, handle reasonably well, and can deliver exceptional service. Easier to work on, too! As for a V-8 conversion or transmission upgrade beyond your T4 or T5, that's an option. 60Bubba is about to do a small-block Ford V-8 swap into his CJ-7, and we'll be discussing that project at the forums. We can discuss swaps further if you have a need for the power. You're in Washoe County and may need to consider emissions issues, we can explore that demand, too...As is, this Jeep can meet your described needs with ease! Regarding shops, my shop is full-time devoted to video production work and how-to projects for the magazine and Vimeo On Demand streaming rental topics. The aim is to serve Jeep and other vehicle owners with instructional guidelines to perform their own work. Not sure whether you have the desire or shop space for doing 'DIY' work, but that's where I can help...A 1985 Jeep CJ-7 4x4 is a terrific vehicle for the DIY learning curve. Also, I'd be delighted to discuss trails in our area and throughout Northern Nevada. It's springtime, snow is melting and the four-wheeling access gets better every day... Moses
  27. Mr. Ludel, do you have a repair & replacement shop in the Reno area ? I picked up a 85 CJ7 in December of 2016, and I'm curious as to what I would need to do to install a later model engine with fuel injection and an automatic or should I sell my CJ and look for a newer jeep with the features I've mentioned. I have no idea about adapters if any are needed or if there are straight swaps. I'm not interested in any of the rock crawling or heavy duty 4 wheeling, although I enjoy watching it. My main interest is roaming around our backroads & finding interesting places to photograph, fish and explore. Any answers or suggestions you have would be greatly appreciated. Robert Byrns, aka BubbaQ1 Quote Edit
  28. FAMILY FIRST, Scott...Sounds like Jims did a thorough job on the harness. Are the terminal ends molded? How do they handle the connections? Plug types? The OBD-II port is very useful if the OEM G.M. ECM is still storing codes. Nice! Electronic connections must be free of ohms resistance. I use rosin core solder and multi-layers of heat shrink tubing on interlaced wire splices. In it for the long haul! I like this approach... I took a peek at Jims Performance website (http://www.jimsperformance.com/). So, your harness for a L35 CPI system is custom and one-off for Jims? Does the shop also do TBI harnesses? Moses
  29. Hi Moses We've had some business and family issues. I should be able to get back at it within the next week or so. I did get the harness back from Jims. He eliminated all unnecessary wiring to give me a stand alone engine control only. All connections are labeled, computer is flashed, I'll let you know how it works when I get there. He also installed a code reader port. I've got the cooling covered. I'll be back ASAP. Scott
  1. Load more activity
×