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Moses Ludel

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Everything posted by Moses Ludel

  1. Monty...As a guess, the "KT88" bearing is likely a Timken T88. The "K" could be for "Koenig" parts inventory replacement purposes. Below is an illustration of the T88 Timken bearing. Does this look like a match? If this is it, the number is current, and retail price has it at $10-$15 from a variety of sources. I've added two part numbers that Timken still uses. The links are live and go to Motion Industries. If you can confirm the bearing fit (see sizes), the bearing is available from any Timken source. There is a small image below the larger one that may be helpful. Moses Timken T88W-904A3 Tapered Roller Thrust Bearing - 0.885 in Bore, 1.8906 in OD, 0.594 in Width Timken T88-904A1 Tapered Roller Thrust Bearing - 0.885 in Bore, 1.8906 in OD, 0.594 in Width
  2. Hi, Monty...What is your winch type, make and model? I'll check for a parts schematic that shows the orientation of these parts. The shown pieces appear to be in good shape! Vintage quality...Compare this to contemporary winches. Season's Best! Moses
  3. Wow, Stuart, the long and winding road! Years ago, Arizona required a simple tailpipe reading for emissions and never opened the hood. That changed, as you hint, to match California and other states where a visual inspection of emissions equipment is a mandatory part of emissions tests. Maybe there is a model year cutoff for the full inspection test, and if old enough, a vehicle reverts to the older tailpipe reading only method? Or does this have to do with your zip code? Pleased that you're on the road. This must be gratifying. The high HC/CO readings with your original carburetor could have reflected a unit with the wrong jetting. You were meticulous in your approach to rebuilding the carburetor, it should have performed to OEM standards. (The old carburetor may not have been in original form.) In any case, the El Monte shop's build must have the right jet and metering rod. Keep us posted on the performance and your driving impressions. Yes, the CJ-7 is a great improvement over the vintage Jeep CJ3B chassis, worlds apart. You have a longer wheelbase (94" versus 80") to smooth out the washboard roads plus longer springs to improve ride quality and control. I like an aftermarket front spring/shackle reverse on any of the Jeep models through the YJ Wrangler. Vehicle control and steering improve, and there's less frame impact when climbing over rocks or limbs. The front axle trails instead of being pushed forward from the anchor (rear) end of the front springs. Something to consider, not a must. Where will you be driving off-road at Arizona? You have a wealth of open country to explore! Season's Best, Moses
  4. The Clark slipping out of 5th does sound like worn bearings, most likely at the nose end of the main/output shaft. This is the pilot bore bearing (not to be confused with the crankshaft/input shaft pilot bearing) that keeps the main shaft aligned. End bearings are likely worn, too. (A worn crankshaft pilot can cause jumping out of the other gears.) Bearings are not that expensive if you want to tackle this rebuild yourself. The bearing set, seals and making gaskets for a Clark would be less costly than a core/used SM465...As for noise, much if it is harmonic and inherent to spur gear transmissions.
  5. That's what I thought...I serviced a period I-H RD406 powered dump truck in the late 'sixties that had your box. It was a double-clutch, straight cut gear (non-synchromesh) Clark. These units are bulletproof but do require a savvy driver, of which there are few in this era. Yes, it would make the ultimate transmission for some applications but would weigh too much and require a divorced transfer case in a 4x4. There is no room for such a transmission and divorced transfer case on a shorter wheelbase 4x4. Doubt that's the market for an iron Clark 5-speed. Why don't you want to run the Clark? It's a somewhat rare bird in vintage Advance Design GMC trucks, the SM420 4-speed was common.
  6. So, the Clark has synchromesh on 2-3-4-5 (overdrive)? Compound first gear is the only gear without synchros? I would think this would be desirable, although the overdrive is light at 16%. Synchro changeout seems cheaper than a good used SM465, which might also need synchronizer rings and and bearings. Your motive for the SM465?
  7. Speed...Glad you're aware of the PSI limit for the Weber. It's even lower than I thought, good that you have the specification of 3.5 PSI maximum. If the stock fuel pump puts out too much pressure, there are inline pressure regulators that can be manually adjusted to the desired pressure. This has been the time-honored way to damp down pressure on these Weber installations. On Jeep CJ/YJ 4.2L engines, the AMC inline six fuel pump is in the 6-7 PSI range, which can wreak havoc on a Weber float and needle. If pressure is too high, a Weber will over-fuel the engine. Sounds like you have a vacuum leak, maybe a good one. When backing the throttle stop screw out completely, if the engine continues to run fast, that's a sign of air entering the A/F stream from somewhere. If not a vacuum leak, you may be pushing too much fuel due to excessive fuel pump pressure as we've discussed. Check the fuel pump pressure. Check for a vacuum/air leak. A simple approach is a can of WD-40 or a similar low volatility petroleum base spray cleaner. (Avoid hot areas like the exhaust manifold!) Spray a light mist around the carburetor base, the intake manifold junction with the head and the vacuum hoses. Engine speed changes indicate a leak...Cap off or plug vacuum lines if you suspect a vacuum hose or device leak. See whether that helps identify the leak(s)...Even the brake booster can create a vacuum leak, often a big one if the diaphragm or check valve bleed off. Moses
  8. An Allison transmission? The 4L80E four-speed (OD) was typically used in the '90s unless his truck is either heavy duty or has a transmission swap. Wiring will be his bigger challenge, overlaying the chassis wiring schematics to compare the differences then splicing or swapping harnesses.
  9. About right on the custom driveline construction cost. Joints are also spendy for medium duty trucks. $125-$150 for shaft work like this was a norm for years. Shop labor is floating around $100-$125 per hour at Reno. $250 is 2-2.5 hours.
  10. Innovative approaches...The Weber is altitude sensitive and generally needs jetting for the altitude/locale. Another issue is float/seat pressure. Keep fuel pump pressure within the limits for the Weber, usually 4 to 4.5 psi or so. Look up the specs for your particular Weber series. Flooding will result otherwise.
  11. He's not losing much by getting rid of the 6.2L/6.5L GM diesel. The turbo 6.5L version was okay, naturally aspirated they were not impressive. We had a mid-'90s Suburban 2500 test vehicle with this engine; the 6.5L had a stronger lower block assembly and turbocharging, it ran quite well, made enough noise and got marginal fuel economy. The gas engine is probably a match for fuel efficiency.
  12. I like the SM465 for its tough torque capacity and robust iron case. The compound gear is very low (almost like the SM420). This unit was a natural behind a 383 SB Chevy stroker conversion in a Landcruiser. Major gear reduction! A wise choice for the '54 GMC and not a difficult fitup...
  13. The owner of a 1998 Jeep Wrangler had several questions about the use of a CompCams 252H grind camshaft in a Jeep 4.6L stroker inline six engine build. His engine core is a 1998 Jeep TJ Wrangler 4.0L...Here is our exchange. My comments are in red: Keith M.: I’ve seen some posts, including on Comp Cams’ site, that say the head on the ’98 has different size valve stems than other years and that cams that will work on other years won’t work on this one. I’m pretty confused by what seems to be conflicting and unreliable information. Moses: I’m not clear why there is so much confusion. CompCams should know parts interchangeability and sizing. 4.0L valve stems are available in both standard size and oversize for a given engine, which may account for the confusion. Parts interchangeability spans many years. Exhaust or intake valve head diameters may change while stem diameters remain common. Federal-Mogul is a well-known reman engine industry parts supplier. We’ll use F-M as a reference source: https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=V-2527&pt=Intake%20Valve&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= [Intake valves] https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=V-4554&pt=Exhaust%20Valve&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= [Exhaust valves] https://www.fme-cat.com/Application.aspx?year=1998&make=JEEP&model=WRANGLER&cat=Engine&engbase=4.0L%20L6%20242cid&ga=Y&back=true [Overview of intake and exhaust valves] https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=VK-216&pt=Valve%20Spring%20Retainer%20Keeper&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= [Valve retainer keepers] https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=HT-2011&pt=Valve%20Lifter&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= [Lifters are the same over all inline Jeep/AMC sixes] A concern with camshaft installations would be the rocker arm ratio. See the rocker arm interchangeability in this listing. AMC/Jeep inline six rocker arms are essentially the same with the same ratio: https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=R-905A&pt=Rocker%20Arm&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= Pushrods for 4.0L engines fit the full range of 4.0L years. They are available in different lengths because the rocker arms are non-adjustable. I have discussed this at length in the forums and magazine; see https://forums.4wdmechanix.com/topic/1155-42l-re-build-77-cj-7-project/ and my reply comments from December 25, 2018 and forward. Read the details on fitting the right length pushrods. Here is the F-M parts listing for 4.0L pushrods in a standard (OEM baseline) length. There is selective fit application coverage to compensate for engine block and cylinder head deck height changes, head gasket thickness and so forth: https://www.fme-cat.com/overlays/part-detail.aspx?brand=SP&PartNumber=RP-3275&pt=Push%20Rod&lu=1998%20JEEP%20WRANGLER&vin= Keith M.: I want to use the 252 cam you recommend in your video but I haven’t been able to find a video with specific part numbers. Some of the information I’ve seen indicates that I need to change the valve springs if I go to that cam, other places I don’t see that. I need a timing set but have new lifters so I’m trying to get a package if I can but don’t want un-needed parts. I’m also unsure of which cam works with fuel injection as I have been told this makes a difference. Moses: Sounds like you just need the 252H camshaft if your new lifter set is compatible. If the lifters are OEM replacement, ask CompCams tech if OEM lifters will work with the 252H camshaft. Typically, the camshaft kit includes the cam and lifters, but if CompCam simply uses an OEM replacement type lifter, you could save some here. The 1998 4.0L upper valve train (valves, retainers, keepers, rocker arms and such) should be readily compatible with your 252H camshaft choice. You do need to use the correct length pushrods to attain the right lifter preload as described at the forum exchange and magazine articles. If lifters are the same, you can see whether CompCams is willing to sell the camshaft by itself. They may not warrant the camshaft if you don’t use their lifters…Always use engine break-in lube additive (Lucas, CompCams, etc.) with ZDDP to assure proper seating of the lifters with the camshaft lobes. You still need a timing set from whatever source plus correct length pushrods if the OEM pushrods are not the correct length. As for the PCM compatibility, there is the issue of Coil-On-Plug engines requiring a different camshaft than the 252H. Your engine is not C-O-P, it has a distributor and earlier PCM programming. I’ve not heard of anyone getting an engine code from a 252H camshaft installed in a pre-C-O-P engine like yours. If I were to build my 4.0L 1999 XJ Cherokee distributor type engine into a stroker, I would use the 252H grind camshaft rather than use a stock OEM replacement. I have used the 252H grind with EFI truck engines as far back as a Ford 300 inline six MPI engine (1987). The 252H grind has also been tested repeatedly by Tony Hewes on pre-C-O-P EFI/MPI 4.6L stroker builds. Keith M.: This package would be fine, under specifications it says it works on years 1964-1998. But I can’t be sure that’s correct really, because of the fuel injection and possible valve stem issue: https://www.compcams.com/high-energy-206-206-hydraulic-flat-cam-sk-kit-for-amc-199-258-4-0l.html If I had to replace valve springs I’d use this kit: https://www.compcams.com/high-energy-206-206-hydraulic-flat-cam-k-kit-for-amc-199-258-4-0l.html In specifications it says 1964-1998, but under Installation Notes it states ‘K-Kits will only work in 1964-88 models due to different valve stem diameters” Moses: Valve springs and retainer sizes are governed by the valve stem diameter. This appears to be the reference here. Logically, you do need to match valve springs and retainers to the valve stems and cylinder head spring seats. For your purposes, you only need to use the right diameter 4.0L valves, matching springs and retainers for your cylinder head casting and model year choice. Approach the valvetrain like you’re rebuilding a stock 4.0L engine. Choose replacement parts for the cylinder head casting and block casting involved. Keith M.: And somewhere in here there’s a review for a kit where the reviewer states the kit won’t work specifically on the 1998 engine. That’s strange to me and seems incorrect- I have two heads, one is a 7120 of an earlier (1991-1995 I think) and then there’s the 0630 casting that came off my 1998. Both have 5/16 valve stem diameters by my measurement so I don’t believe there’s a difference. I’m assuming the whole problem with valve stem diameter is the earlier years are a different size so the later heads won’t work with the keepers and other valve spring parts that come in the kit. Moses: My assumption, too. We’re in accord here… Keith M.: I’m just trying to avoid getting the wrong cam and having it fitted to the bearings and then having to get another one. I don’t want to reuse the stock cam really, but I don’t know enough to say a different cam is worth it. This Jeep needs to idle and drive well on the street, I can’t have it be stumbly or rough idling as I will be selling it at some point soon. I do want to learn how to do these builds well as I restore IH Scouts- the 4.2 was an available engine that I think is much better in many ways than the IH engines and if I could find a way to build an excellent and reliable stroker with a 4.0 block and the 4.2 crank I’d do these regularly. Moses: Understood, Keith…I’m a Scout buff, too. If fuel efficiency is an aim and vehicle weight not excessive, a 4.6L build from a 1991-99 (pre-C-O-P) 4.0L block and head could make sense as an alternative to the 304 or 345 I-H V-8. I-H was wise to outsource AMC 4.2L/258 engines, they offered a high-torque design that tolerated emission controls better than competitors. Keith M: Thanks for your help Moses, I’ve done my best to sift through all the info out there and I just can’t come to the right conclusion without your advice...Respectfully, Keith M. Moses: No problem…You want to build a safe and reliable engine. My recommendation for the 252H grind has always been simple: This grind offers increased lift with moderate duration. More lift without increased duration means a “bottom-end” camshaft that actually enhances the idle, tip-in response and mid-range power. This cam is much different than the 260H grind. Since the 1980s, I have recommended the CompCams 252H for fuel efficiency, quicker torque rise (more diesel-like), superior idle and rock crawling tip-in stability. This camshaft raises idle vacuum and maintains higher manifold vacuum from idle to mid-range rpm. This is simply a trailer pulling, rock crawling, high manifold vacuum camshaft for optimal power at low speeds, midrange and to a realistic 4500-5000 rpm maximum shift point. It will make power to 5,500 rpm in a pinch. In your 1998-based pre-C-O-P PCM engine, you should experience no problems. The lift is not extreme and will not create valve spring “coil bind” with stock ratio rocker arms. (Valve springs must be new or in good condition and provide the proper spring rates at specified valve spring heights.) With a stroker crankshaft, the 252H makes even more “stump-pulling” sense. The gearing of your Jeep should target a 4500-5000 rpm maximum engine speed. Your single rail EFI/MPI, the 1998 PCM, MAP sensor and camshaft sensor will find this camshaft compatible. The 302 Ford V-8 injectors described in my articles will make sense. C-O-P engine builders should consider the newer grind from CompCams to avoid engine check light issues. The C-O-P PCM and camshaft position sensor monitors the OEM camshaft valve opening/closing events (lobe valve timing). The CompCams 252H valve opening/closing events can trigger an engine check light on a C-O-P engine with its PCM programming. A roller chain (Cloyes or similar) timing set is always an improvement, though the 252H camshaft will work with a stock/OEM replacement set as well. Your focus should be selecting the correct length pushrods and setting the valve timing to factory marks. This is optimal valve timing for the performance gains I have described…Make sure you install the distributor correctly, which will properly index the camshaft position sensor and ignition rotor in the process. There is nothing exotic about the 252H grind. I have installed this camshaft as an OEM replacement. The valve/lobe timing creates an issue with the C-O-P engines because the later PCM is looking for specific valve opening and closing events in relationship to the crankshaft. Let us know how your 4.6L build turns out and your impressions of the 252H camshaft performance... Regards, Moses
  14. Yea, Stuart! Sounds like you nailed it...This will be a great engine. Smart to use Lucas break-in oil with ZDDP. The camshaft lobes-to-lifter bases represent the highest friction point per square inch in the engine. Proper break-in will deliver many, many years of quality service! Congrats on a job well done... Moses
  15. Really nice work, Stuart...Attention to details is impressive, especially the emissions components. You should have the tune ironed out shortly, just in time for fall hunting! Reliability will be high for this 4.2L engine. The DUI ignition is a great upgrade. If you need a sounding board for any fire-up issues, I'm here...Awaiting your first impressions of the "new" CJ Jeep! Moses
  16. Sounds like a plan...Getting your ducks in a row. Researching the legal constraints.
  17. Makes sense...Smoke test is easier than using a vacuum pump. You can pinpoint the leak location visually.
  18. Donor vehicles are a crapshoot. Ideally, you'll find a wrecking yard with the vehicle you need. Timing seems to dictate success with finding these parts.
  19. Ian, I sensed there is a professional side to Graham Hill. He's been in front of the camera quite a bit and shows it. Nice solo job with the YouTube coverage of the Holland Track. I'll make a point of checking out the Australian 4WD Action programming... "Harry" the FSJ has a job cut out! Your outdoor travels are remote and require a vehicle in top shape—plus lots of planning and preparedness...The Simpson Desert sounds like a helluva run! Moses
  20. I installed TJ Wrangler Bestop seats in the XJ Cherokee, and they work great. However, they crowd the console and tunnel like you hint. I had to do a lot of work with the sub-frames, including fabrication of "adapter" mounting brackets to allow use of the OEM Jeep floor mounts and slide adjusters. It was ultimately a "bolt-in" after fabricating the adapters, which required welding and use of my Harbor Freight bandsaw. Realistically, lots of work but worth ditching the stock, flimsy Cherokee seats. Explore the later Toyota pickups and Toyota passenger cars. See if you can devise a suitable factory parts swap. It's always easier than aftermarket unless a model specific seat package is available for your year/model Toyota pickup. Then there's the option of rebuilding your original seat frames and having the upholstery and padding upgraded. Moses
  21. Hi, Speed...The 4.0L will swap with a major amount of wiring work, some even suggesting a dashboard change. The Explorer engine and ECM harness, a degree in electrical engineering and lots of time on your hands might see this through to completion. Your carbureted '84 Bronco II chassis raises the bar on the wiring dilemma, even for a 2.9L EFI engine swap. Here's a useful exchange about the swap options and chores. Some comments seem more valid than others: https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1004706-85-bronco-ii-engine-swap-what-are-my-opitions.html Would I do it? I'd likely go with a 302 V-8 and aftermarket plug-and-play FoMoCo Motorsports, Painless or street rod wiring harness. The 4.0L V-6 is considerable gain, but a 302 would be substantially better. Improved radiator cooling and other chores, like exhaust modifications and engine mounts, would run up the tab. I have toyed with the Ford 302 H.O. pushrod MPI V-8 as a potential swap into our XJ Cherokee. It's a lot of work and commitment... Moses
  22. Ian, I took the time to play through Graham Cahill's video—twice...This is an incredible work, not to mention a great historical account of the Holland Track. Cahill has it down. I do a lot of video, and his one-man-show videography, narrative and post-production editing are first rate. He uses minimal tools: a light digital/video camera, an inexpensive drone and a selfie stick! His sets are really well done, the meals, campfire, his rabbit cookout, the steak, watering holes, the granite, on and on. Thanks much for sharing this, the aerials give much more perspective to the vastness of that country...Does Cahill do this strictly as an avocational/recreational thing? Is he producing videos for sale or rental? He really should be...The rig is purpose built, he's got the whole package. So, now I get it. When you do the Holland Track, you're on for the ride. Glad your FSJ is in good condition and well equipped. One motorcyclist and a 4x4 each 11 days make for awfully light traffic! Wow, what a great venue... Moses
  23. Quite a Jeep fleet, Ian, much variety as well! The CJs are always fun for recreational use, the FSJ has the right wheelbase and ride quality for highway and all-around use. The Willys makes a great parade vehicle; too much restoration and detailing work to risk damage as an off-road vehicle, though they were workhorses in the day. Willys handling/ride quality is archaic...The CJ5 and CJ6 will handle the beaches well. Next year's charity rally sounds worthwhile for a lengthy outback trip with the FSJ! Over the years, with moves that resulted in less storage space, we've trimmed our approach. The '99 XJ Cherokee has proven to be a tough all-around vehicle. Ride quality is good with the 6-inch long arm suspension and 33" tires, the 4.0L engine with AW4 automatic is a rugged package. I fit the axles with 4.10 gears and ARB Air Lockers, and the vehicle has worked as a daily driver and for highway use, mild off-roading and even as a moderate rock crawler. The latter has been kept to a bare minimum, mostly for publicity shots and filming at places like Moab. The odometer reads 176K miles on this vehicle, we bought it stone stock at 94K. The only fixes have been a new water pump, radiator, brake service, front unit hubs, driveline upgrades, and I just installed a rear main seal and rebuilt/resealed the Saginaw power steering gear. Hot tip on the inline AMC/Jeep rear main seal installation: Use a Fel-Pro main seal and Fel-Pro OS34308R oil pan gasket. Fel-Pro has made the pan installation a breeze with its four plastic expansion studs and a one-piece gasket. I was able to support the new gasket and even a new Dorman oil pan (good product, too!) in place overhead, starting the bolts with no need to hold the pan. (Unheard of, right?) Tossed in a new Sealed Power iron oil pump and Melling screen for insurance at 176K miles. Good cylinder seal and great bearings, original injectors, who's to complain about an MPI/EFI engine? The Saginaw gear bench build went well, you're familiar with this chore. The steering feels as new, the Jeep rides and handles well. I've owned/restored/built up a 1950 CJ3A, 1981 CJ-5, a 1955 CJ-5 (first year) and an '87 Grand Wagoneer. Add three Toyota FJ40 builds along the way: 1971(stock), 1976 (lifted/oversized tires and a 383 stroker Chevy V-8 with SM465 4-speed, and a 1978 with a 383 and NV4500 transmission...Each had its place, the FSJ was my wife's favorite. Moses
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