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2005 Grand Cherokee Wheel Studs Broken


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#1 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 11:01 AM

Ok, i thought this one would be pretty simple. I got a call last night that a friend lost a front wheel on her Grand Cherokee, and after going to check it out, found that all the lug studs had broken off, which tells me someone way over torqued the wheel. As i was trying to replace the studs, which i did by using an old steel wheel i had, putting the studs in the spindle, and then drawing them in by tightening the lug nuts against the wheel, it stripped 2 of the new studs, as well as destroyed the threads on the new nut.

 

I have replaced lug studs many times this way, and never had an issue before, so my question is, are they just making the studs of a cheaper quality, or is there another way those studs are supposed to be taken out and pressed back in? Admittedly, i don't do a lot of work on Jeeps, but i didn't think they would be any different than studs on any other vehicle i have done in the past.



#2 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 11:52 AM

Wheel bolts or studs are tough material, high tensile that typically snaps before "stretching" or yielding.  Replacement studs are intended for the same "interference fit" as the OEM studs.  Depending on the flange hardness, the pitch of the stud serrations and the diameter of the stud serrations, you can find a lot of resistance here—and you did!

 

I have done your approach "in the day" as a field repair or even direct replacement.  In the disc brake era, however, it seems easier to use a press for this task.  Most of us who do any volume of automotive work have acquired, at the very least, a 20-ton Harbor Freight hydraulic press on sale ($149.99 on today's sales flyer via Email!).  The floor press and bed assure complete seating of the stud(s) and eliminates the risk of the stud or nut loosening in service.

 

Caution: When installing a wheel stud with a press, be sure to back up the flange with a sleeve or similar device to prevent bending the flange while pressing the stud into place!

 

Granted, this is an involved task with unit hubs and a front axle shaft.  In your neck of the woods, from our previous discussions, the axle shaft can be rusted into the splines of the hub, creating its own "nightmare" when removing the unit hub from the axle shaft.  Here is an HD video/article I did on the use of an OTC puller, a tool that would be necessary for separating the axle shaft from the unit hub:  http://www.4wdmechanix.com/HD-Video-Tool-How-to-Using-the-OTC-7394-Hub-Puller.html.  Check this out before attempting to remove the unit hub and wheel flange assembly.

 

Sorry to be the bearer of these tidings, but this is the "new normal" for wheel stud replacement on harder disc brake hub flanges.  The good news is way less stress to new threads and less risk of either breaking the stud or stripping the nut and stud threads.

 

I would suggest replacing the unit hub assembly if the Jeep Grand Cherokee has mileage.  Here is an example from 4WD Hardware, the Omix-ADA hub assembly.  Note that the assembly is complete with wheel studs, so replacing the unit hub includes what you need as well:  http://www.4wd.com/Jeep-Drivetrain-Jeep-Axles-Differentials/Front-Hub-Assembly.aspx?t_c=12&t_s=514&t_pt=5660&t_pn=OAI16705.07#.  You can shop around, these unit hubs are very common.

 

Moses



#3 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 12:32 PM

The wheel hub/bearing assembly were replaced about 2 months ago, and then the studs snapped while they were driving it yesterday, which is what leads me to believe someone over torqued the lug nuts severely. After reading what you said about the studs being pressed in, but not finding a way to seat the hub on my press and have it contact the entire back of the stud, i tried using a c-clamp, and a small piece of tubing on the front of the hub, and it worked perfectly. Im teaching my nephew how to do some of this stuff, so after i showed him how i did the first one, i left him to do the rest. Ill see how well he does in a few minutes.



#4 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:16 PM

If the backside of the flange (side we press the stud from) is accessible for your press, I've used a deep impact socket as a "receiver" for the threaded stud portion.  The socket stands on the bed plate or flat bed of the press, it's somewhat of a juggling act to keep the hub flange square until you apply pressure.

 

This would also work with your C-clamp if the clamp applies sufficient pressure to seat the studs.  Make sure the studs seat completely, you should be okay.  Try the deep impact socket in place of the tubing...

 

Moses



#5 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:27 PM

When i first went to replace the studs last night, i was working on the side of the road and just trying to get the Jeep home. I figured that just using the lug nuts against the wheel would seat them in the flange on the hub. I didnt expect it to end up actually destroying the threads on the new studs like it did.

 

I didnt think of using a socket to protect the stud threads and support the flange. The "tubing" i used was actually a heavy gauge 1 inch piece of black iron pipe i had left over from a water supply project i did for a barn awhile back. The c-clamp seemd to work perfectly.

 

The studs all look like they are fully seated, but just in case they arent, now that they are in and i dont have to worry about the press not putting them in straight, i plan on using the press, with the pipe to cover the threads, just to make sure they are all the way in the hub.




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