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I recently purchased a 1971 Jeep CJ5 with the Dauntless V6. It ran when i got it but very, very rough. I changed the spark plugs, and did an oil change to cover my bases. When i run the engine it will sit there and idle but no oil it getting up to the valve covers, push rods, rocker arms etc. The gauge in the dash was reading 40psi, to make sure i was getting this pressure i plumbed up a new oil gauge and it read 40psi as well. I pulled a few of the lifters and primed the pump manually with a drill through the distributor hole. Oil runs into the lifter valley through the proper channels...

On other engines i have worked on oil comes though the lifters and shoots up the push rods into the rocker arm assembly. This engine has push rods with holes in them so i assumed this was the case. I have an old Motors manual so i flipped through until i found an oil schematic of this Buick v6 engine. This is where my confusion started. The oil flow chart in the Motors manual shows oil going to the hydraulic valve lifters but not up the push rods. Oil makes its way into the rocker arm assembly through a tube in the head and then flows back down into the lifter valley via outside the push rods.... I do not have any kind of tube that supplies oil to the rocker arm assembly aka anything under the valve covers. I ordered a new hydraulic valve lifter just for kicks and it has no way for oil to enter the channel in the push rod, the seat for the push rod is solid. 

I thought maybe oil is getting away through a main or journal bearing. I pulled the rear main and a journal, i measured the ID of the bearings and the OD of the corresponding crank. Both were well within tolerance (according to the motors manual) not even questionable. 

So i am at a loss. How does this engine get oil to the rocker arm assemblies? I have a couple theories:

1) oil shoots around the plate inside the hydraulic lifters and shoots up into the rocker arm assembly? I tried warming the engine to get the oil hot and viscous enough to do this but still nothing. 

2) One of the channels that takes the oil somewhere is clogged. The clog may be restricting flow and the oil is taking the path of least resistance out the bearings? When i pulled the oil pan for the first time the oil that was in the pan was a thick jelly like substance. I am getting oil to the hydraulic valve lifters though so I'm not sure that this clog may be the case.

3) I am missing a lubrication tube that takes oil into the rocker arm assembly. Maybe its the wrong head? This option is my biggest concern, everything looks normal to me but is something missing? Im not sure...this is where i hope your experience will help me. Do you know if these hydraulic valve lifters can be used in conjunction with a head that does not have the oil supply tube taking it to the rocker arm assembly? 

If you need any pictures or any other information i would be glad to provide them. I would really appreciate your input!

Thanks, 

JohnB

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, JohnB said:

I recently purchased a 1971 Jeep CJ5 with the Dauntless V6. It ran when i got it but very, very rough. I changed the spark plugs, and did an oil change to cover my bases. When i run the engine it will sit there and idle but no oil is getting up to the valve covers, push rods, rocker arms etc. The gauge in the dash was reading 40psi, to make sure i was getting this pressure i plumbed up a new oil gauge and it read 40psi as well. I pulled a few of the lifters and primed the pump manually with a drill through the distributor hole. Oil runs into the lifter valley through the proper channels...

Hi, JohnB!  Let's answer these questions!

On other engines i have worked on oil comes though the lifters and shoots up the push rods into the rocker arm assembly. This engine has push rods with holes in them so i assumed this was the case. I have an old Motors manual so i flipped through until i found an oil schematic of this Buick v6 engine. This is where my confusion started. The oil flow chart in the Motors manual shows oil going to the hydraulic valve lifters but not up the push rods. Oil makes its way into the rocker arm assembly through a tube in the head and then flows back down into the lifter valley via outside the push rods.... I do not have any kind of tube that supplies oil to the rocker arm assembly aka anything under the valve covers. I ordered a new hydraulic valve lifter just for kicks and it has no way for oil to enter the channel in the push rod, the seat for the push rod is solid.

First-off, let's be sure this is a 225 V6 and not a later 231 (3.8L) Buick engine.  The 225 is a "nailhead" engine design, the valve cover bases lay nearly straight atop the cylinder heads and not on a distinct slope like the 231/3.8L and 252 V6s.  If necessary, post some photos.  We can quickly determine the engine design. 

I thought maybe oil is getting away through a main or journal bearing. I pulled the rear main and a journal, i measured the ID of the bearings and the OD of the corresponding crank. Both were well within tolerance (according to the motors manual) not even questionable.

So, does this engine have "paired rods" at each crankshaft rod throw?  The paired rods are characteristic of both the odd-fire 225 and the early, odd-fire 231 V6s.  Even-fire 231 engines start in 1977 and have a crankshaft rod throw for each connecting rod.

So i am at a loss. How does this engine get oil to the rocker arm assemblies? I have a couple theories:

1) oil shoots around the plate inside the hydraulic lifters and shoots up into the rocker arm assembly? I tried warming the engine to get the oil hot and viscous enough to do this but still nothing.

Nice thought, but unfortunately not possible or reliable, the rocker arms need continuous oil feed.  Actually, on the 225 V6, the oil feeds from the pump to a pair of galleries that feed down each side of the block in line with the lifters. At the front of the engine, these two galleries have feeds that run up through the block then through a cylinder head feed to the front end of the rocker shafts.  Pressurized oil courses through each rocker shaft and oils the rocker arms.  Pressurized oil feeds to the inner end of the rockers and the pushrod tops then runs down each pushrod to oil the base of the pushrod and the lifter cup.

Possible oil blockage can be a clogged passageway in the feed to the rocker shaft or a rocker shaft(s) installed upside down.  If not aligned properly, the rocker shaft oiling hole will not index with the block/cylinder head oil feed hole.  Oil will not flow down each pushrod and will not reach the rocker arms or pushrods.

2) One of the channels that takes the oil somewhere is clogged. The clog may be restricting flow and the oil is taking the path of least resistance out the bearings? When i pulled the oil pan for the first time the oil that was in the pan was a thick jelly like substance. I am getting oil to the hydraulic valve lifters though so I'm not sure that this clog may be the case.

See my response to your #1, the plausible cause.

3) I am missing a lubrication tube that takes oil into the rocker arm assembly. Maybe its the wrong head? This option is my biggest concern, everything looks normal to me but is something missing? Im not sure...this is where i hope your experience will help me. Do you know if these hydraulic valve lifters can be used in conjunction with a head that does not have the oil supply tube taking it to the rocker arm assembly? 

No tube(s).  A 225 will have the oil feeds through the front of the block and up through passages in the cylinder heads to the front rocker shaft pedestals.  If you remove the rocker shafts, you will see the oil feed holes at the front rocker shaft pedestals.  Make sure the flow from the lifter galleries to the rocker shaft pedestals are not restricted.  Clean each rocker shaft, too.  They could be clogged or gummed up.

If you need any pictures or any other information i would be glad to provide them. I would really appreciate your input!

If you do not have iron rocker arms and the valve covers lay on a slant instead of flat and upright, you have a 231 (or rarer 252) V-6.  Please share photos of your findings.

Moses 

Thanks, 

JohnB

 

 

 

Hi, JohnB!  

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Alright I got fed up messing with the engine in chassis so I spent the last two nights pulling the engine putting in stand and tearing it down. I do not see any oil passages coming into the head to oil the rocker assembly. The lifters I have have solid seats so no oil can come up that way. I'm at a loss but I took lots of pictures so hopefully you can make some suggestions and help me figure this out!

 

image.jpeg

Here is a picture of the block before i tear it down. Hopefully this one will be the tell if this engine is in fact the buick 225. 

image.jpeg

 

image.jpeg

 

Above is a picture of the head with no oiling ports that i recognize. 

let me know if you would like to see any other pictures. 

Thanks again, 

John 

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JohnB...There are no oil passageways through the cylinder head on this engine...This is an odd-fire 231 engine.  (Origin of the engine would be 1973 to early '77 era.  In 1977, Buick introduced the even fire 231/3.8L that has a crankshaft rod throw for each connecting rod.)  The 231 odd-fire V-6 giveaways are the cylinder head valve cover angles, the stamped steel valve rocker arms and button shafts, and the EGR valve, which was not introduced in the industry until post-225 Buick/Jeep V-6 engines.  The 225 odd-fire used an air injection and positive crankcase system but not EGR.

In digging deeper, you solved the riddle, and you're correct, there are no oil passageways up through the cylinder heads.  The rocker shaft pedestals do not provide oil for the rocker arms.  The rockers and shafts receive pressurized oil from the valve lifters  through the hollow tubular pushrods.

Your engine oils the valvetrain through its  hollow pushrods.  The pushrods receive oil from the cupped (top) seats of the valve lifters.  The lifter bases are flat (well, actually minutely convex), as this is a flat-tappet hydraulic lifter system.  Do not mix the lifters if you intend to reuse them, they must fit back into their respective bores.

Look at the pushrods, they should be hollow.  That is the oil passage to the rocker arm, shaft and valve stem.  The top of each lifter has a pushrod seat/cup with an oil squirt hole.  Each rocker arm lubricates independently via its pushrod.

Please confirm your findings...

Moses

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Hi Moses, 

I really appreciate your help on this! Its great to get help from someone who is well versed in dealing with these engines. My next question is how the oil makes its way through these hydraulic lifters. There is a solid plate inside these lifters that has very little clearance on each side. I don't think oil can make its way around these lifters and still provide enough volume to make it to the rocker assembly through the push rod. I have ran the engine with these lifters in and nothing makes its way up the push rods. Is it possible these are the wrong lifters or am i just missing something? Below are some pictures of the lifters tore down and the plate in question

valve lifter plate 2.PNG

valve assembly 2.PNG

 

Thanks again, 

JohnB

 

 

 

valve lifter.PNG

valves.PNG

valve lifter plate.PNG

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Important details!  If the engine only ran briefly and did not appear to be oiling the rocker arms, and if the pushrods are hollow/tubular, your theory could be correct.  We know that the 225 did not oil upward through the pushrods.  If these lifters do not flow oil upward under pressure, the rockers would be starving for oil, even if the pushrods are tubular.  These might be 225 type lifters if the lifter bore size and other dimensions are the same as the 231.

The "solid" disc could be a restrictor for a 225 application to reduce the high volume of oil that would be available here.  Pressure at each lifter is quite high, so without this solid disc or restrictor, if made for in a 225 engine, these lifters would be spewing oil out the top.  The pushrods do not flow oil to the rockers on a 225, and the only volume of oil needed above the lifter plunger would be lube for the pushrod cup and seat.  On a 225, oil also drains back down the pushrods to the cup/seat.

If 225 lifters will fit the bores of a 231 V-6 and have a similar height, they would starve the rockers.  It could be that Buick engineers of the 225 V-6, or an aftermarket lifter manufacturer, used a conventional lifter for a similar G.M. engine that oiled the valvetrain through hollow tubular pushrods.  The lifter manufacturer installed the disc/restrictor to serve the 225 Buick V-6 market, using a more common lifter prototype as a parts base.

To know what's going on here, you would have to compare an odd-fire 231 hydraulic lifter to one of your lifters.  You do need lifters that will flow sufficient oil through the pushrods to the rockers and valvetrain.  The disc would prevent that from happening.  

Glad we could discuss this, others may have similar issues between a true Buick/Jeep 225 and a Buick 231 V-6.

Moses

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  Moses I have a oiling question also 1967 225 I had no oil to right head rocker arm shaft, Found head oil supply hole plugged with soft  material  so I took head off and ran a drill bit of the same size as the hole ( no metal shavings ) through it reinstalled the head along with new rocker arm assembly ( rockers,pedestals.shaft ). Now head over oils and oil runs down the valve stems into the cylinders and that side smokes.I have a few questions to ask if I may.1.) The rocker shaft oils through the front pedestal is the oil ment to return to the crank case through the back pedestal as it also has a hole in the head at  the pedestal base  this would take some of the pressure away from the shaft so not all the oil comes out of the rocker arms.2.) Did I drill through some kind of soft restricting orifice in the head oiling hole.3.) Is the only oil return back to the crank case from the head the 2 oil pathways at front and the back of the head. 4.)I have the notch in the rocker shaft facing the front ( fan ) on the right head and to the rear (fire wall ) on the left head.could the bolt on the front pedestal be letting to much oil around it. With the valve covers off there is way way more oil going to the right head then the left.5.) what is the reason the notch has to be in the correct position as it looks like it the same either way.

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timk...You are on the right track at analyzing the problem!  Here is the factory message at "D1-60 Rocker Arm Assembly", note the "Caution" statement details:

Jeep 225 V6 Rocker Oiling.pdf

My source is a mid-'sixties reference from the Jeep FSM for the CJ/V6 models.  To the point at explaining the oil stack-up and flooding the valve stems...Zoom in for clarity, it's a PDF.

If you have further questions, I'm available.

Moses

 

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   Thank you Moses 

How do I find the explanation for oil stacking, I have seen the 2 pages you sent me I have also read the a very brief warning that tells you how to place the notch on the shaft so this will not happen, pretty straight forward stuff.I am still trying to locate a oil flow diagram that shows if the oil flow through the rocker shaft is supposed to return through the back rocker pedestal head hole or if that hole just dead ends in the block.

 

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Hi, Tim...See the emphasized quote below, part of the PDF caution statement.  The attention is on the rocker arms having return passages that must align with the rocker shaft properly.  At "D1-60. Rocker Shaft Assembly" in the PDF above, the opening remarks refer to the important parts orientation. Be aware that rocker shaft assemblies, and even the cylinder heads, will interchange bank-to-bank. Note the rocker shaft end notches (near cotter pin) locations: toward the front at the right engine bank; facing rearward (toward the firewall) at the left bank.

If parts are aligned correctly, each rocker arm's return passage feeds excess oil back into the rocker shaft.  If the rocker shaft has rotated or been swapped end-to-end, the oil ports in the shaft do not align with the rockers.  Align the notch and see whether you need to twist the rocker shaft 180-degrees to align the oil ports and rocker arms:

"Caution: Oil  ports of  the   rocker  arm   shaft  must coincide  with   oil   return  passages of   the   rocker arms. If they do  not,  engine oil  has  no  return path from   the   cylinder head   to  the   crankcase; in  that case,  engine oil  flows  down   the   valve stems and burns in  the   cylinders.  There  is  a  notch   at  one end  of  each   rocker arm   shaft. When rocker arms are  properly installed on  the  shaft, this  notch  will be  at front of  right   rocker arm   shaft and   at rear of left  rocker arm  shaft. Refer to Figs.  Dl-25 and Dl-26."

Taking this a step further, I'm adding the oil diagram for the 225 V-6 and an additional illustration of the rocker shaft orientation and the "notches" or "drill marks":

Jeep 225 V6 Oiling Diagram.pdf

This comes down to 1) the orientation of the rocker arm oil feed and return ports to the rocker shaft oil ports, 2) the orientation of the rocker arm pedestals to the rocker shaft, and 3) whether the oil returns to the rocker shaft through the rocker arm return flow passages.  Rocker shaft and rocker arm pieces must be assembled in proper order.

Think of this as an oil loop at the rocker arms.  Make sure the rocker shaft parts are aligned and in place to encourage oil flow back into the rocker shaft from each rocker arm.  Excessive oil should not spill over the valve stems and guides.  

Pressurize oil feeds up through the front rocker shaft pedestals and charges the rocker shafts.  As seen in the oil flow chart, oil does not return to the crankcase from the rear of the rocker shaft.  The pedestal is drilled and interchangeable with the front pedestal for parts simplicity, but oil has no place to go at the rear of the engine block.  There are no block oil return passages at the rear of the 225 V-6 block.  Oil pressure flows upward at the front of the block and feeds the front rocker shaft pedestals.

Note:  In the oiling diagram for the 225 V-6 and similar Buick V-engines, there is no indication that the oil flows back down the rear pedestal and into the crankcase.  What may seem confusing is that the cylinder heads and rocker shaft assemblies can be swapped from one side of the engine to the other.  The key for unrestricted oiling and proper oil drainage back to the crankcase is the alignment/orientation of the rocker arms and rocker shafts.  As seen in the oiling diagram, return oil does trickle down the pushrods to the lifter cups.

If rocker arm oil is pooling or spewing onto valve stems and down the valve guides into the cylinders, you will experience oil burning at that bank of the engine.  In any case, the valve stem seals must be in place and sealing properly; you likely did not damage the seals if the head was removed and installed without disassembling the valves.

Please share what you find and the remedy...

Moses

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  Hi Moses

Do you know what the clearance is between the rocker arm and rocker arm shaft is supposed to be on a 225 dauntless v6.As mentioned above this reman rocker arm assembly I got just flows oil out around the rocker arms and stacks up on top of the valve stems,everything else is as it should be. Tim

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Tim...What's puzzling is that you apparently did not have the oil burning before the rocker shaft replacement and head removal?  If that's the case, the rocker shaft assembly would be a possible culprit unless the valve stems, guides or seals became damage during the head removal.

Additional concerns:  Did the new head gasket in any way restrict oil flow/trickle down the pushrods?  Is there some way that oil is not able to return to the valley?  Is oil "captured" at the top of the cylinder head?  Or could this be a PCV valve or valve cover problem, causing excess oil to suck into the intake manifold?  A defective or missing PCV valve and not a valvetrain or valve guide problem at all?  Is the PCV valve in its proper location and functioning properly, with valve cover oil deflector(s) in place around the PCV valve?

To answer your current question, is the rocker assembly now set up properly?  Are you sharing that everything is assembled right with all parts in place (rocker arms, end shims, shaft springs, etc.)?  And the oil is it still dumping down the valve stems?  

Do you now suspect that the rocker arm-to-shaft oil clearance is incorrect, and that this is causing the oil spillage?  This might be possible.  Clearance between the rocker arm and shaft should be a normal "oil clearance" and no more.  Recommended rocker arm to shaft oil clearance is 0.0017" to 0.0032" for a 225 Buick/Jeep V-6.  Ideally, this would be only a slight wobble with no visible wear into the hard chromed shaft surface.  

You mention that you have a reman rocker shaft assembly.  I would definitely measure the shaft to rocker arm clearance.  For oil to return into the rocker shaft as described earlier, clearance must be within specification.  Otherwise, as you hint, it might bleed off the sides of the rocker arms at the shaft.

Generally, a reman rocker assembly has a freshly plated shaft with the rocker arm bores sized to fit the shaft diameter.  The aim is to establish the proper clearance, like we do when fitting a piston pin to a connecting rod's small end bore.

I would disassemble the reman rocker shaft carefully, laying parts out in order of disassembly.  Compare the layout to the opposite rocker shaft, including the location of the end notch as I described earlier...Inspect the shaft and oil feeds, their locations and alignment with the pedestals and rocker arms.  Confirm that the shaft faces the correct way for this bank of the engine as described.

Inspect the rocker arms' bores and feed/return passages for restrictions (air blow to confirm flow); make sure the rockers fit properly in relationship to the oil feed/return passages.  Check shaft-to-arm clearance.  While the rocker shaft assembly is off, check the valve stems for excess side movement/clearance in the guides.

Once you determine/confirm that oiling (feed and return) at the rocker shaft is correct, if there is still oil wicking down the valve stem and guide, the trouble could be worn or damaged valve stems, guide seals and/or worn valve guides.  Valve stem to guide clearance helps control oil seepage.  Valve guide seals deflect or reduce oil available at the valve stems.

Glad to continue the discussion...Let us know what you find.  Add photos to your posts if useful...

Moses

 

 

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Thank you Moses

The rocker arm assembly is correct as I had them send me a new one and gave them those same measurements.I put it on and had the same problem.So I took the rocker arm assembly off both heads and spun the motor with a remote start switch and watched the oil flow in both of the supply ports to the rocker arm shaft pedestals.The right head (the one that had been over oiling) has 5 times more oil coming out it actually clears the head and streams onto the header while the left just gently flows out of port.I can physically  put a rod down both of the heads oiling ports the same depth and meet no restriction. This engine has about 125 miles on it after complete rebuild but has set for 8 years.What do you think.Would blowing compressed any thing through it help ? Dos it oil through a cam bearing that spun a little. Thanks Tim

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Tim...Note my earlier description of the oiling system and flow sources:

"...Actually, on the 225 V6, the oil feeds from the pump to a pair of galleries that feed down each side of the block in line with the lifters. At the front of the engine, these two galleries have feeds that run up through the block then through a cylinder head feed to the front end of the rocker shafts.  Pressurized oil courses through each rocker shaft and oils the rocker arms.  Pressurized oil feeds to the inner end of the rockers and the pushrod tops then runs down each pushrod to oil the base of the pushrod and the lifter cup."

Jeep 225 V6 Oiling Diagram.jpg

Look closely at the oiling diagram photo above.  If this is accurate for the 225 V-6 as indicated, the oil flows from the oil pump directly to the left and right lifter banks through oil feeds at the front of the block to the rocker assemblies.  If this is correct, then a restriction between the right side oil flow and the left side oil flow could create the problem you're experiencing.  Or there is too much pressure/flow volume at the right side oil feed passage (as you are experiencing).  

Another possible cause would be a high-volume or high pressure oil pump providing more oil than the rocker feeds need.  The oil pressure requirement for this engine is only 33 psi at 2400 crankshaft rpm.  A high-volume pump could be putting out as much as 70-75 psi.  This is normally not an issue if the bearing clearances are correct and internal oil flow is unrestricted.  On the Buick V-6, as shown, the camshaft bearing oil feed holes or slots, especially the front camshaft bearing, must be aligned with the engine block and crankshaft oil feed holes.

Note: Camshaft bearing fit on a vintage Buick V-6 or V-8 "nail head" engine can be problematic, some claim that the Buick camshaft/block bores were not on center and that Buick allegedly installed and honed unfinished camshaft bearings to size.  Machinists, myself included, used precise hand scrapers to fit aftermarket camshaft bearings to size...If the bearing clearances (fit) are correct, oil bleed-off from bearings and rocker arms will drop the oil pressure to acceptable norms...What kind of oil pressure registers on the dash gauge or a mechanical oil pressure gauge at various engine speeds?  Where is your oil pressure gauge port located?

With oil flowing directly from the oil pump to the galleries that feed the lifters and the rocker shafts, camshaft bearing problems would create these possible issues:  1) if too little bearing clearance or restricted oil passageways (including misaligned cam bearings), the oil volume/pressure could back up from the cam bearing(s) or crankshaft bearings, creating high pressure and/or volume and causing greater flow up the right bank rocker shaft feed or 2) a partially spun or misaligned camshaft bearing could restrict oil flow at the camshaft bearings, as you suggest, and boost the oil pressure at the rocker shaft feeds.  By design, from what we see in the diagram, the right side rocker shaft (poorly illustrated and not visible!) would get plenty of oil as you describe.  

If the left side shaft is receiving far less flow, consider a restriction in the left feed passage that leads to the rocker pedestal. This could also create back pressure to the right side rocker shaft.  That back pressure would result in excess flow of oil at the right side rocker shaft.

I would do the simplest check at this point. Verify oil pump/engine oil pressure with a mechanical gauge.  Judge which oil port you're testing and where that oil sources within the engine.  Ultimately, the goal is to adequately oil all of the cam and crankshaft bearings, the lifters, connecting rod ends, rocker shafts, etc.  

Once confident that oil flow and volume is adequate throughout the engine, the right front rocker shaft oil flow could be restricted to balance flow between the two rocker shafts.  (This dovetails with your original question and thoughts about a factory/OEM restrictor.)  If you're satisfied that you're getting adequate flow and protection at all bearings and the lifters, try restricting the oil flow to the right rocker shaft: Temporarily restrict oil flow between the base of the right front rocker arm pedestal and the oil feed passage.  A piece of steel shim stock with a drilled oil hole could serve as a temporary restrictor plate.  If oil flow becomes better (yet not too great) at the left rocker shaft, you have a solution.

This takes us back to your original thought about a restrictor.  The restrictor would have to be above the oil junction in the block, so that the oil flow restriction would only be to the right side rocker shaft.  

A restrictor in the right side front rocker shaft pedestal oil feed passage would be easier to fit.  The restrictor needs to stay put.  One idea would be drilling and tapping the base of the pedestal to accept a set screw.  The set screw would be drilled through its center with the correct size hole to serve as an "orifice".  The size of this orifice would dictate the volume of oil to the right side shaft and create back-pressure to deliver more oil to the left side shaft.  Seated in the threads properly, the set screw would stay put.  Here is an example from Moroso at the Summit Racing catalog.  The 7/16" size would likely be too big.  For ideas: https://www.summitracing.com/parts/mor-22045/all.  There is a 1/4-inch set screw mentioned; you might check the Moroso catalog online.

An option would be the use of proper I.D./O.D. steel tubing pressed into the base end of the pedestal's oil passageway.  Tubing could be short, like 1/2" to 3/4" in length...The tube's O.D. must keep the tube firmly in place.  The I.D. would be the flow/volume restriction.  You'd need to experiment with I.D. orifice diameter.  If you cannot resolve the right side rocker shaft oiling issue without going through a major hassle, and if the engine oils properly at all vital points, this restrictor might be a cure.  Try the shim stock and orifice test first...

Moses

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 Thank you moses

I had the same thoughts with shim stock and tubing.I am wondering if some one had done this earlier in this engines life and used some kind of soft material and when the machine shop boiled the head it just turned it into a solid mass that was the source of my original plug leading to the right head not oiling (the one I drilled out).I would just as soon not pull the engine out and all apart to see what I can find if any thing,but I can it is just a toy and not a daily driver, I'm just not sure what I would find. What would you do ?

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Tim...As I hinted, as long as you're getting adequate oil flow to vital parts, if the only issue is this balance of oil flow between the rocker shafts, restricting flow to the right side rocker shaft would certainly be worth testing.  See whether restricting oil flow at the right shaft/pedestal actually provides more flow to the left side rocker shaft.  Basically, if both shafts have adequate flow (not too much or too little), this will work.

If you're concerned about spun or misaligned camshaft bearings (the front bearing in particular), troubleshooting would require a major tear down or at least camshaft removal, which on a 225 V-6 with its thick timing cover/oil pump arrangement is a job.  Lifters and pushrods would need removal, etc.  If you do not suspect lack of oil flow to the cam or crank bearings, rods, lifters, etc., concentrate on the right side rocker oiling pedestal restriction, an easily accessible test.

Hint:  If the camshaft and crank bearings were not getting enough oil, pressure would read low (depending upon the gauge port location), and the lifters would clatter from lack of oil.  You're not experiencing that symptom or rod bearing noise, a good sign!

As for my earlier question, what kind of oil pressure are you reading, and where is the gauge oil port located on the engine?  This could be telling.  Is the oil pump stock, without a high volume kit?  The typical (Melling) high volume conversion would look like a spacer plate between the oil pump cover and the timing cover.  This accommodates longer oil pump gears, a direct way to boost volume:

http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/MEL0/K20IPHV/02338.oap?year=1967&make=Jeep&model=CJ5&vi=1381238&ck=Search_02338_1381238_-1&pt=02338&ppt=C0145#itemDetailTab_

As for a restrictor plug being installed at the right side cylinder head, that would have to be aftermarket.  The heads interchange left to right side by both design and part number on a Buick 225 V-6.  It would be unlikely that a "factory" restrictor would be in the head, though who knows?  If the engine has a high volume oil pump enhancement (aftermarket Melling type), that might account for the over-oiling problem and possibly the use of a restrictor?

Moses

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Hi Moses

Stock oil pump and pressure after warm up about 45 at 2500 rpm and 25 at ideal and 65 to 70 when cold. I will try some shim stock as I have some laying around.

                                                                                                                                                                                                               Thank you Tim

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Good next move...The oil pressure sounds good, Tim!  If all parts get oil, you're golden!

Keep us posted on the shim restrictor findings...

Moses

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