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Mike House

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  1. I realize this thread is a few years old but I have read through it several times gaining insight from the good pics and dialogue! Thanks guys mike
  2. For sure! That girl rarely leaves my side if I’m not at work. Hunting, fishing, yard work and working in the shop! She’s my partner in crime!
  3. While performing a root cause analysis on the broken bolts in my timing cover I believe I have discovered the root cause! Hahahahaha. My daughter Capri may have been responsible!
  4. I also pulled the locking hubs apart, cleaned inspected and lubed them before reassembling them. All pieces looked to be in good shape and the hubs now turn freely in and out.
  5. I may have jumped the gun on the hubs and drums here. After researching what should be on the 3b, measuring the two hubs comparing them I decided to order a new drum and drill tap holes in the one hub to facilitate the drum? many thoughts? thanks, Mike
  6. Some parts arrived today so I changed gears from engine to front axle. Both hubs had play in the wheel bearings. When I took it apart I found that they were not set with a reasonable amount of preload or they backed off over time. to my surprise I found some good parts behind the drums! That was a plus. the bell crank was very sloppy, tie rod ends worn out and the passenger side had been welded. I rebuilt the bell rank with new parts and assembled the tie rods. New tie rods and new ends. I didn’t assemble it on the Jeep yet. Still trying to decide if I should open up the closed knuckle and inspect everything. It seems good and tight and the steering knuckle is smooth on the king pin bearings...... probably should open it up. side note two different style drums on the front axle. One inboard and one outboard. I believe the 3b came with outboard drums.
  7. Ahhhh chasing the elusive steelhead! One of the rivers I grew up on had a very strong winter run of 100% native steelhead. When I was younger you could fish it for these natives but now it is closed for steelhead. The rivers out on the peninsula still generate very strong steelhead runs although most of them are hatchery fish now. You have been a very busy guy and sounds like in addition to your career you have given back to the community in a significant way. I was born in Oceanside CA which is in Orange county and than we moved to WA state in 1975. Looking back on my career in maintenance two jobs stand out to me as my top one and two. In the Navy along with being an aviation structural mechanic I was a flight deck troubleshooter. Normally the top guys from each of the discipline were chosen to be flight deck troubleshooters. As flight deck trouble shooters we were responsible for performing pre-flight inspections on the jets as they taxied up to the catapult to get launched. We walked along the side of the jet and were positioned just under and outboard of the wing. The catapult would get hooked up to the nose landing gear, the jet would go to "full military power" the pilot would cycle all of his flight controls as we checked for issues, once we gave a thumbs up the steam piston went to full power and the catapult would drag the jet off of the deck. This process was repeated over and over for 12-16 hours a day depending on where we were operating. It was an adrenaline rush all day! The other would be the time I spent working in Alaska as a field mechanic for a logging company on the remote island of Afognak. I loved the work and loved the environment even more! I would leave the camp every morning about 6am and drive my shop truck to one of the logging sites. I would have a project to work on all day and support logging crews and their equipment if they had any issues come up. I would service the equipment at the end of the day and head back towards camp. With very long days in the summer I would usually stop and fish on my way home. When the silver salmon were running it would not be unusual to stop at a creek on the way to camp and pull a half dozen fish for the freezer or smoker! I love it in Alaska! May be time to head back at least for a vacation! I am not sure if I will ever build something that would call for a Dana 60 but... if I did I will note your comments above. As I work on this willys and source parts I am very pleased to find the availability and price point on these parts! It definitely makes the process more fun keeps the project moving along!
  8. Rear crossmember/bumper showed up today so I hung it loosely with a couple carriage bolts I had in the garage from building a utility trailer.
  9. Some parts arrived today so I changed gears from engine to front axle. Both hubs had play in the wheel bearings. When I took it apart I found that they were not set with a reasonable amount of preload or they backed off over time. to my surprise I found some good parts behind the drums! That was a plus. the bell crank was very sloppy, tie rod ends worn out and the passenger side had been welded. I rebuilt the bell rank with new parts and assembled the tie rods. New tie rods and new ends. I didn’t assemble it on the Jeep yet. Still trying to decide if I should open up the closed knuckle and inspect everything. It seems good and tight and the steering knuckle is smooth on the king pin bearings...... probably should open it up. side note two different style drums on the front axle. One inboard and one outboard. I believe the 3b came with outboard drums.
  10. Moses it is a small world after all. I do love and miss the Pacific Northwest but middle Georgia is where my career has taken me for the time being. I have a sister in Eugene and a brother in Florence OR out on the coast. You have had an amazing career and sounds like there is more in store for you with the video projects. It is a great sense of accomplishment to know that the equipment you maintain is out there rolling up and down the road every day. I worked with some folks back in WA that had worked for Pope in OR many years back. I have been in the sawmills now for 20 years. the first 5 in maintenance and the last 15 in management. The industry has changed significantly in 20 years. I often talk to my crews about how sawing lumber hasn't changed in hundreds of years. Trees are still fat at the bottom and skinny at the top and we are sawing them into square edged dimensions! What has changed is the technology and expectation to get more lumber from every log. Our industry like many others has found it extremely difficult to source and hire for the skilled trades. Mechanics, millwrights, electricians and welders. Young people lost interest some time ago and our industries are suffering as a result. Interfor has developed an apprenticeship program that is recognized by the Department of Labor and is administered and certified through the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology or NAIT. I represent Interfor's South region as a member of the "steering committee" for this program. Our apprentices spend three years learning the trade through hands on training, classroom work. At the end of the program the apprentices that complete the program successfully earn a journeyman millwright card recognized by the DOL. The program is completely free to the students and they have not obligation to stay with Interfor when they complete the program. It is our hope that if we treat them right they will choose to stay with us. It is a great program yet I am still surprised at the lack of interest from our crews. The program is open to all employees not only maintenance crews. We normally start off with a lot of interest but when they find out that they will have to work hard for this privilege most lose interest. Still we consider the program to be a success. We have graduated our first class this year with roughly 75% of the original students completing the program. Lock nuts.... In my experience the nylock nuts are best used in applications where they will be removed for maintenance in 6-12 months. As you stated they do not hold up to heat and vibrations well. They also tend to be taller than a top lock nut so if space is a constraint they may be an issue. We did use them on jet aircraft in the Navy but not on any of the powerplant or structural stuff. They were often used with clamps on electrical harnesses under the skin of the fuselage. In the sawmill we will use them in low impact applications and areas that our maintenance guys can do their dynamic PMs while the equipment is running and they can see it. This flange bearing is a good example. Here is something interesting. That flange bearing is one of 8 on a set of planer outfeed belts. We purchased them from a vendor as complete units ready to drop in and hook up as part of the project. Of the 8 bearings only one bearing had the locking collar tab locked in place on the nut. The others did not have any of the tabs locked into the nut. It is those small details that will keep your equipment running at maximum up time.
  11. Thanks Moses, That looks like a painstaking process. Thanks for sharing the articles. When I was 16 I went to work for a small logging company on WA states Olympic Peninsula where I grew up. The owner pinched every penny and I had the opportunity to work on some very old and very unusual equipment. I did all of the tire work on the log trucks and dump trucks in the beginning and so of course left hand threads were normal for these heavy trucks. I worked for this logging company in the shop for 3 years before graduating high school and joining the Navy. So in a short 6 months I went from working on worn out old logging equipment in an old shop and in the mud and muck to maintaining multimillion dollar jet aircraft! What I have found through the years is that no matter if its a 50 year old 4wd or a brand new jet aircraft the mechanical theories and principles are the same. I have spent most of my career as a mechanic and millwright. Now I manage a sawmill in GA for one of the largest sawmill companies in the world. https://interfor.com/ We are in the middle of upgrading a 1973 southern yellow pine sawmill to a state of the art sawmill. In all the investment will be around $100 million. Most of the folks in my maintenance department have been working on the old iron in a reactive mode. Getting them switched to proactive maintenance may prove to be a challenge. Even though it is all new it still requires maintenance every day. Any how. The double nut. Yes I will get a lock nut to replace the double nut. It seemed odd that the kit came with a nut and flat washer and no lock nut or lock washer. I spun it on there because it seemed odd that there was not lock nut.
  12. Thanks Moses, That looks like a painstaking process. Thanks for sharing the articles. When I was 16 I went to work for a small logging company on WA states Olympic Peninsula where I grew up. The owner pinched every penny and I had the opportunity to work on some very old and very unusual equipment. I did all of the tire work on the log trucks and dump trucks in the beginning and so of course left hand threads were normal for these heavy trucks. I worked for this logging company in the shop for 3 years before graduating high school and joining the Navy. So in a short 6 months I went from working on worn out old logging equipment in an old shop and in the mud and muck to maintaining multimillion dollar jet aircraft! What I have found through the years is that no matter if its a 50 year old 4wd or a brand new jet aircraft the mechanical theories and principles are the same. I have spent most of my career as a mechanic and millwright. Now I manage a sawmill in GA for one of the largest sawmill companies in the world. https://interfor.com/ We are in the middle of upgrading a 1973 southern yellow pine sawmill to a state of the art sawmill. In all the investment will be around $100 million. We will finish phase one in the next few weeks. Most of the folks in my maintenance department have been working on the old iron in a reactive mode. Getting them switched to proactive maintenance may prove to be a challenge. Even though it is all new it still requires maintenance every day. Any how. The double nut. Yes I will get a lock nut to replace the double nut. It seemed odd that the kit came with a nut and flat washer and no lock nut or lock washer. I spun it on there because it seemed odd that there was not lock nut.
  13. Moses, I sure appreciate your feedback and input on this forum! I did not realize that the left side had left hand threads and I broke them all off. Live and learn. I understand the need for left hand threads on semi trucks and the like but is it necessary on these jeeps? I just went back out to the garage and looked at that locking nut. When I installed it I didn't think that there was enough thread sticking through the nut and something didn't seem right. What I found was that I left the old flat washer on the mount and put the new washer on top of it. I removed the old washer and tightened it down correctly. Looks much better now. As I dig deeper and deeper into this jeep I have found a lot of parts and pieces that look like they were put back together in a rush almost like the jeep was disassembled and put back together just to make it appear whole.
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