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i have searched the internet far and wide I need a service manual for a 1969 international scout 800a that I recently picked up...I have owed close to 40 vehicles in my life and I've never not been able to find a FREE digital copy of the service manual for a vehicle....it's really sad when scumbags are charging up to $200 for a copy! When I find one or if someone has a paper copy (around 988 pages)I have the ability to convert it to digital I will share it from here to Texarkana to help others like myself to keep these old corn binders on the road....let me know in my PM if you have one or a copy you can share via google docs thanks in advance!

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69scout800a...and others.  Following up on your comments, I went to the Super Scout Specialists, Inc. website and drilled down through the site...They have a digital reproduction of the CT-2302 manual covering your Scout and other Scout 80/800A/B models.  This is from original film, so it should be the actual I-H manual—and new.

The price is $75 (plus shipping?), this is a new book, and if I owned one of these models, this would be a lot less work than trying to copy a used book from cover to cover.  In general, an OEM vehicle FSM will sell for much more than this price today.

https://www.superscoutspecialists.com/store/pc-1863-40-ih-service-manual-scout-80-800.aspx

Moses

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Yeah I saw that honestly $75 plus shipping is about double what I feel is fair plus like I said the whole point of these forums is to share knowledge not profit from it (at least my opinion) and like I said I've found free or under $40 copies for every vehicle I've owned just quite disheartened that the manual isn't available somewhere and when I do find it I will gladly convert it to digital and even host a free site to share it with the world for the love of restoring these old trucks and keeping them on the road! Thanks for the help thou with the link! Cheers Matt!?

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Understood, Matt...Trying to be helpful, I'm not a shareholder in Super Scout Specialists, Inc.  They've been in business since the '80s, and I know them through the industry and my media work as a business that is knowledgeable and provides a service to the I-H light truck/Scout community.  I-H books are apparently rare, that's not surprising given the sales numbers for the Scout and Scout II models compared to G.M., Ford and Dodge trucks.  Frankly, none of these earlier manuals for any manufacturer are easy to find, though they do pop up periodically at eBay.

There are automotive book sources like Faxon, and they know the scarcity of a given book, pricing it according.  We ran a vintage car and truck mechanical restoration shop, and in the mid-'2000s, I found some vintage books at swap meets like Hot August Nights and some through smaller book retailers.  More popular FSM books are available as reprints, typically $30-$40 like you share.  (The I-H book is long, lots of pages, and it is likely priced accordingly.)  I bought OE manuals in what would be described as "good" (not excellent or anywhere near new) and Motors Truck manuals for $30-$40 apiece.  Most book sources know how rare a book might be, so there are very few "bargains" other than fair minded private parties and garage sales, where rare books sometimes pop up.

Recent years, many books have been copied and turned out as PDF or CD disk versions.  Some respect copyright and are even licensed, which the I-H manual at Super Scout Specialists, Inc. might well be if the original film was used.  Otherwise, copyright can be an issue if an individual tries to copy and profit from the sale of a copyrighted book.  It is also not a good thing to copy someone's creative work. 

An automotive service manual would hardly be regarded as "creative work" in that sense, and if only a copy and not a bound book, and if given away as free information, like you describe, there's little incentive for the original copyright holder to pursue the matter legally—especially a vehicle manufacturer that benefits from its legacy followers and consumer brand identification.  It's even less likely if the vehicle is no longer built; the OE no longer provides parts or service to consumers, which is certainly the case with I-H Scout and Scout II.  I can't see a Scout/Scout II owner getting his or her vehicle serviced at a Navistar commercial truck dealership.

You'll have to see if anyone responds...Agreed, these are forums intended to share knowledge.

Moses

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I have two (2) of the Scout II FSM's that I use.. actual bound factory manuals...

One is well worn and has many sticky bookmarks for specific items as I have owned a few Binders..  the other one is in pristine condition and shall not be fingered by me or anyone else..

I had to purchase both of these and they were not cheap, but not really what I would call expensive..

Cost of doing business with old iron in my way of thinking.  I guarantee they have saved me more than I paid for them!!

Plus I have many more manuals and books, including a complete Chevrolet Tri Five factory assembly manual set and even a couple of Moses' books which I found very helpful when messing with Jeeps.. All bought and paid for as I am sure that he had considerable time and effort invested in his Creative Work..

Moses, my "new" Scout is still getting somewhat disassembled to start reassembly to iron out a few PO bugs and shortcuts..  gonna be a while on this one as I have too many other things going on at the same time..

Hope you are well,

Gene

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All's well here, Gene, thanks for asking!  I know about PO bugs.  That's the first place we should go when buying a used vehicle—or even a used house.  

We bought a very well built 20 year old home that had mouse visitors. (No shortage of available mice, we lived next to endless acres of ag property.)  After several years and various attempts to "solve" the problem, I discovered that the PO had installed a post-construction electric range and ran the vent pipe through the cabinet floor and sub-floor.  In the process, he used something like a Sawzall to cut an elliptical hole with a gap over 1" on one side—plenty big for field mice to come and go along the vent pipe!  Put a nice vent shoulder cap around the pipe, secured it properly and neatly, and we never saw a mouse inside the house again.  You get the idea, we've all been there.

So, what's the strategy with the '80 Scout II restoration?  What's on the radar screen and obviously in need of help?

Moses

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Well, the first thing is get my heat gun & scraper out and get all the dang bed liner off the outside of the truck.  Then just do some clean up and Rust-X the wheel wells where the PO put some bed liner for flares and it separated from the body, got stuffed with leaves and H2O and started a nice compost pile which made some very nice rust along all 4 wheel well lips..fortunately did not rust through.. that will follow the bed liner removal.  Then find any rust and get a coat of Rust-X on it for the time being..

Next just get it clean!!! Gawd I hate it when folks let vehicles get filthy :).. the engine is gonna take some good pressure washing with a bunch of degreaser in the mix..  

I have already purchased a new shift cable and Pertronix Ignition & Coil as the current coil is leaking..add some new wires & plugs, drain and refill all fluids F to R..After the housekeeping just get her running decently and drive it for a while to discover what else needs looking at this coming winter (all 2 months of it)...

That's about all for now.. this weekend, I am spreading 50 tons of crushed limestone on the driveways at the Boat & RV storage to fill up all the chug holes from the 10 inches of rain we have had...so JD tractor & land plane, here I come..

Wanna come help??:D

Later,

Gene

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Nice mix of paid work and Scout II restoration, Gene.  I'm always curious how a Scout II's I-H 345 V-8 and A727 Torqueflite have held up.  You have the Dana 44 axles front and rear and that stout Dana 300 transfer case.  How many "estimated" miles are on all this machinery?

Non-I-H folks have little concept of the 304, 345 and 392 V-8 designs and stamina.  These are industrial strength, medium-duty truck engines.  My first professional stint at wrenching was a fleet of light and medium duty military surplus trucks that included a number I-H Metro Vans with the BD-240 inline sixes and a vintage I-H dump truck with a spur gear transmission and the RD406 gasoline six, an engine that dwarfed the era's 270 and 302 Jimmy sixes.

The BD-240 would be considered similar to other 'fifties and early 'sixties era OHV pushrod inline sixes with four main bearings, engines like the GMC 248, 270 and 302, the Ford 223 and 262 or the Chevrolet 235 and 261—with one exception:  removing a Metro Van's iron cylinder head for preventive maintenance, I did a double take.  These iron inline sixes boasted a machined chamfer at the top of each cylinder unlike all of the competition!  There was far less carbon buildup, the cylinders wore minimally and tapered less, and installing new piston rings was a breeze.  These industrial engines also featured common pipe threads in the block and head, a sign that they could be serviced alongside ag equipment in the field.

When that pristine 1956 short wheelbase S120 4x4 showed up at Alessio Motors, San Diego's major IHC truck outlet in the late 'sixties, I seriously considered buying it.  The pickup was original and very clean, with a most unusual history.  Iron transfer case levers were like crane or crawler tractor sticks!  Even in its short wheelbase form, that beast must have weighed over 5000 pounds with a 4x4 system and PTO front winch.  Maybe 8 mpg on a good day?  That's one that got away...Curious about the model?  Here's a beautiful, restored example:

http://www.classiccarstodayonline.com/2012/05/07/pictures-from-antique-automobile-club-of-america-spring-car-show-may-6-2012-in-florham-park-n-j/1956-international-truck-tom-austin/

Of course, the Scout II is a refined and contemporary I-H vehicle, but inherent in each of these 'Binders is a legacy of ruggedness and longevity, the best parts available at a given time.

Moses 

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