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I’m a newbie to this forum. I need advice on selecting a best career option for my brother. He has completed his schooling and he wishes to select welding career but our family has a little confusion regarding the selection. I’m not much aware about this field. Is it a good career option or should we choose a better one? Are there education loans available for the course? My son has surfed about the institutions providing the course and had selected one. This is their website (http://weldtechtraining.com/). He is saying that it’s a registered agency and has got many accreditations. Is there anyone who has studied there? Will they provide placement assistance? He claims that this is very good field. Is there anyone working in this field? What can be the working conditions like physical comfort travel etc? What are the opportunities for students who enter this careerPlease help…..

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First of all, flynntr, welcome to the forums!  Regarding welding as a career, I have a bias in favor of this choice.  I like the creativity and metallurgy aspects, the "science" behind fusing metals properly.  I like the hand-to-eye coordination challenges and the satisfaction at seeing a finished structure or repair.

Like any trade, there are various levels of skill and specialization.  Weldors range from structural (like steel buildings or light manufacturing) to exotic metals fabricators who work from rigid blueprints with specialty filler materials.  Processes worth pursuing are TIG/GTAW and alloys welding.  If adept at these processes, the pay rate and job security increase substantially.

With any trade, it's always about motivation.  If your brother likes welding enough to take it as far as his aptitude and skills will allow, he can make a good living within the trade.  Pipeline certified, aircraft/alloy certified or specialty tool-and-die welders make a higher income and can find work more readily.  Of course, slowdowns in a given economic sector can impede job availability.  The best hedge against layoffs or work shortage is always to be the best and most skilled at your craft.  Safety conscious, well-trained weldors can find work.

I'm not personally familiar with Weld Tech training.  Others may be able to comment on this particular school.  Referrals to graduates who are willing to talk about their job experiences and placements would be helpful.  Ask about the official certifications available.  In the trade, certifications at key processes go a long way toward securing a quality career type job.  I taught adult education level welding, wrote curriculum and had students tested at AWS and I-CAR levels.  These certifications are valuable assets for job procurement.

Moses

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