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Hi Moses

heres a pic of the fsj i bought as  donor car for my ute the 6.2l v8 diesel & 727 auto im going to fit into the cj10 also there is a parts car with lots of spares including a 360 v8 & 727 auto the 360 needs a rebuild so ill probably sell that on but ill put a six & the 727 back in this fsj to keep it going after ive put its engine in my ute

it is currently getting 16l per 100 km which is nearly half what the 4.6l in the cj10 uses & it sounds a lot better to

it has new rotors & drums so ill scrounge those to

if it wasnt so rusty around the roof i would keep it but its life is short but i will slow its deterioration down with a bit of body work but its not a restorer unfortunatly

ill post pics as we do the engine transplant

cheers  ian

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Unique, Ian!  I'm curious:  Previous owner installed a G.M. 6.2L naturally aspirated diesel in this FSJ chassis?  727 Chrysler automatic or a G.M. THM400 behind that 6.2L diesel?  Very unusual but functional setup.  Will the 4.6L Jeep stroker six do well with all that FSJ weight?

Moses  

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Hi Moses the conversion was done by a company on our west coast called brunswick diesels back in 05 its has spent a lot of time sitting in a shed as its only got 40,000km on it since the conversion when it was fully reconditioned they made a custom tourque converter for the 727 & it all seems to work very well as they are a very reputable company who these days are mostly fitting duramax's into toyota landcruisers & nissan patrols

i think the 4.6 should be ok for the fsj as a lot of them over here were 4.2 manuals from factory the auto may rob some power but i would imagine it will still be quite usable

 

for now im just enjoying driving it around as it is

cheers  ian

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This is very cool, Ian!  The conversion was well thought out.  Too bad the Jeep's body doesn't lend itself to restoration.  Many FSJs fetch a hefty price in the U.S. these days, especially a well-heeled Grand Wagoneer in exceptional original or fully restored condition.

I've considered building a Grand Wagoneer with Dana 60 axles and a 5.9L 24-valve CRD H.O. Cummins ISB engine and 48RE transmission (OD built on the 727 platform, original equipment for our '05 Ram 3500).  The ISB would actually fit well, as you cite, the engine bay was designed for the longer 4.2L inline Jeep six.

Keep us posted on this.  I'm looking forward to the 6.2L engine conversion photos!

Moses

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Hi Moses

i went & picked up the parts car that came with 'Harry '( thats what the fsj is affectionately known as) its a shame its body is even worse because its a limited & has all the fruit & i love the colours looks good in the pics but the rear end is rotten

i will be putting the leather seats in thow & should be able to get enough patch panels from the roof & gutter sections to restore harry 

ive become quite attached to this car already i dont often get this kind of attachment i mean ive got a 70 dodge challenger ive restored with 600hp+ & i have little interest in it but ill drive this old jeep every day every where i go just something about it

how weird is that i buy it for a donor car & fall in love with it looks like the cj10 will be keeping its 6 cylinder petrol for a while

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fully understand the attachment, Ian...My wife still prefers our 1987 Jeep FSJ Grand Wagoneer to all other Jeep models we've owned.  Unfortunately, we sold the 'Grand...

The wheelbase on the FSJ Cherokee and Wagoneer/Grand Wagoneer hits the mark.  These vehicles have a wide track width for safe and predictable handling plus a unique, short enough wheelbase for maneuverability.  Beam axles with track and sway bars...Ride quality was equal to or better than any other 4x4 SUV built at the time...World Class!  That's the attraction...

Moses

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took harry out for a fishing & camping weekend with the local angling club i belong to we actually caught fish this time it was a good weekend all the gear in the back & off we went it sounds awesome thundering through the tracks big lazy thumping v8 

i believe you are right about the ride being world class i would even go as far as to say world leading when they first went into production as the range rover didnt get produced until these beasts had been in production for 5 years or so & nothing else would come close till the nineties

cheers  ian

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What a great time, Ian, just the right 4x4 for the job, too!  I just posted our trip to Bodega Bay, California at the magazine.  (See at the Home Page video slider right now:  www.4WDmechanix.com.) We could superimpose our two ocean backdrops!

These Jeep FSJs have become cult vehicles over time, people realizing the far-reaching design of the chassis, body and powertrain...I recall the earliest Kaiser Era J-trucks and Wagoneers rolling off transport trailers at C.O.D. Garage (Jeep, Chevrolet and Buick dealership at Minden, Nevada) while I was in high school.  With the introduction of the AMC/Rambler engines (I-six and V-8), and later the Buick V-8s, the 'sixties Gladiator and Wagoneer became a sensation at Carson Valley.  Ranchers, townsfolk and recreationalists thought the Wagoneer and especially the "Super Wagoneer" were the most versatile and elegantly optioned 4WD SUVs around.  Fortunately, AMC/Jeep continued the tradition from 1972 onward with its own engines.

I'm all about fishing, glad you are, too...Healthy pursuit and great food!

Moses

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Hi Moses

ive been adding a few things to Harry it now has a roof rack ,2 awnings ,a 42" light bar ,9" led spotties ,a winch ,10 disc stacker & an arial & craddle for the mobile phone for better reception up next will be the dual battery system & fit out the back

its done the pinion seal in the rear diff theres a little bit of play in the bearing so i think that best be my next priority

cheers  ian

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Harry's doing what he does best, Ian!  

Pinion seal can be replaced without fanfare if this is the original Dana 44.  Re-torquing the flange nut may take up the pinion bearing play at the factory torque setting (210 ft-lbs or 271 N.m).  This should be a shimmed pinion bearing design without a crush sleeve...Use a new, self-locking pinion nut...After tightening the yoke/flange pinion nut, there should be no perceptible endplay at the pinion shaft...Otherwise, it's take apart time, you know the drill!

Moses 

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Hi Moses

its an amc 20 in the rear i havent checked wheather these are a crush sleeve or can be retourqued to take up the bearing play but im sure ill find out

cheers  ian

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Ian...Ah, the J-truck/CJ Model 20 AMC axle approach for your model...There is a "collapsible spacer" (crush sleeve).  Pinion depth is set with shims.  A new crush sleeve/collapsible spacer is always recommended when re-torquing the pinion nut.  

A caution:  Do not over-tighten and crush the new sleeve too much, you cannot back the pinion nut off if it is over-tightened, another new crush sleeve is required.  A crush sleeve must always place high spacer tension against the backside of the bearings.  Use of a new pinion nut is always wise, I also use Loctite 271 Red on the nut's threads for insurance.

The nut is carefully tightened to the correct pinion shaft bearing preload of 17-25 in-lbs rotational torque with a resistant (new) collapsible spacer.  To get an accurate rotational torque reading, I do the pinion preload with the ring gear and carrier removed from the axle.  This requires sliding the axle shafts outward and removal of the bearing caps.  Do not misplace or lose track of the differential carrier bearing shims and their locations when removing the ring gear carrier assembly.  If you keep the shims sorted out, you can readily restore carrier bearing preload and the ring gear backlash.

Have fun!

Moses

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Hi moses

ive got it sorted out there was another problem when i opened it up the pin through the carrier was coming out & started hitting the back of the pinion so i welded a washer over each end so it cant come out again this saved me from having to open the locker which was proving to be impossible with the tools i have also i replace all bearings which meant the original shims were incorrect fortunately the kit i bought has shims so i was able to set it up it is now quieter than it was at speed but still make a little noise at low speed

the kit i used was the motive gear kit from summit racing it came with crown wheel bolts too but theyre not needed

cheers  ian

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You're resourceful, Ian, but that's no surprise!  Actually, the new bearings, if you reuse the original shim stack heights and placements, generally do not alter the settings.  That's a prime reason to keep track of shim locations and their thicknesses...at least a place to start.

Bearings of the same part numbers, if from quality sources, are most often a dead ringer size-wise.  If the axle was set up properly in the first place, the unworn (new) bearings will restore clearances or the preload, often making the job easier with less fuss around shim stacks and tests.

Proof of fit on these axles is always the ring-and-pinion tooth contact pattern.  If your bearing preloads and tooth pattern are good, you're golden!  

Not disturbing the pinion depth or pinion bearing preload can speed the process along.  Matching the original pinion shim thickness and shim locations will often make this much easier, especially if the axle has never been rebuilt.  The original build on the axle is generally set up properly.

Cheers at the Holidays, Ian!

Moses

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Using a new pinion nut is always wise

-that's a fact and a better solution than using the old one. I like what you did to your vehicle. you're very resourceful indeed. Anyway, may I know what LED light bar you put on your ride?

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Hi 4x4 Freakie

thanks for the compliment the light bar i have is a 42" illuminator they are available through an aussie supplier called 4wdsupercentre.com.au they have heaps of gear at great prices but im not sure if they ship international

cheers  ian

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HI Moses ive just fitted a spartan lunch box locker to my spare rear diff as the 1 in the car began to get a little noisey & the air locker stopped working i think the noise may be due to slight damage to the end of the pinion gear when the center shaft came out of the locker & chipped some teeth last time

so rather than much about any more with it im going to put my spare diff in had it apart today & fitted the spartan it all appears to be in good condition no excessive wear or play even the bearing are all good so ill just fit it as is all seal are fine to "so if it aint broke dont fix it"

sorry didnt think to take picks while i was working on it

cheers  ian

ps ill be going on another offroad adventure in a month  ill load some pics of that when i get back its the holland track (aka john holland way) that ill be doing it was originally a supply route to the goldfeilds (kalgoorlie) from the coast most of it has become roads nowbut 1 section still remains a track (4x4 only)

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Ian...The John Holland Way trip sounds exciting!  Your FSJ should be in good shape for the run.  Can't wait to see your pictures, they're always exciting...looking forward!

Let us know what you think of the Spartan differential...

Moses

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Hi Moses 

just got a new injector pump for Harry something went wrong with the governor so i just bought a new unit they are cheap enough $850 aud delivered figured it wasnt worth messing with the old 1 for that so thats todays job this replacement unit is a delphi instead of a stanadyne but as long as it work i dont care what brand it is

ok i better go & get to it

cheers  ian

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well thats all done & running like a clock nice easy job took a little while for the new pump to prime & i changed the fuel filter while i was at it it was clean but still a good habit to have

if you look at the back of the block in the valley you can see the distributor blank off so it must be a multi purpose block i knew the bellhousing bolt pattern was sml block chev so i guess it is a sml block with different internals & heads etc

cheers  ian

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Ian...Pleased that you have this solved, the $850 (Aus) was well spent!  The original, infamous GM attempt at a diesel was the 350 V-8.  This was derivative of Oldsmobile castings/parts and had visible signs.  As you surmise, your 6.2L must be a spin-off block design although the heads look more like 427/454 Chevrolet types.

What do you think of the 6.2L naturally aspirated diesel?  They were reliable though not world beaters without a turbocharger, but Gale Banks turned them on with aftermarket turbocharging.  This was the original HUMVEE engine, naturally aspirated, as well.  The 6.5L was an improvement, especially the turbocharged L56 design, we had a '94 Suburban 3/4-ton 4WD test vehicle (new) with that engine for a year, a great performer that never got over 17 mpg with the 4.10 gears I requested.  Might have been happier with 3.73 gearing.  I did like the power, the engine performed very well.  Your FSJ should have tall axle gearing, which might make the 6.2L much better on fuel.  You'll see what the fuel/distribution pump does for mileage.

Great photos as usual, very detailed!

Moses

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Hi Moses

i do like the 6.2 like you say no world beater but a good work horse i had thought about a turbo but didnt get to serious as i didnt feel the spend was warranted as for fuel usage fully loaded for our holland tack trip i checked it on the way up there just for curiosity & it was getting 18 l/100km so that converted to 13mpg not so good now ive converted to mpg but we were heavy & had gear on the roofrack making more wind resistance & averaging 110kph (65mph) once we hit the track & were driving slowly it was only using about 20l per day it is generally better when not loaded up for daily running if i drive easy around 15l/100km still not great but its way better than the cj10

this engine was a HUMVEE engine in a previous life so its got a little more power & torque than the civilian version i did expect to notice a slight loss of power with the new pump but it seems the same but a bit better throttle response this is probably due to wear in the old pump

cheers ian

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Hi, Ian...Sounds like you have a good handle on the 6.2L.  Given its unknown internal wear and previous life in a HUMVEE, the non-turbocharged approach remains prudent and best for the long haul.  Boost increases heat, if we force more fuel into our diesel engines, the pyrometer soars.  Turbos are a great way to compensate for altitude, though.

I notice with our Ram/Cummins that vehicle speed, wind resistance (i.e., lift kit, big front bumper and way oversized tires, etc.) plus load are crucial factors around fuel efficiency.  I use the torque peak as a "redline" whenever possible, and with Hypertech Max Energy tune, that is now 2100 rpm.  Actually, 1600-1900 rpm has always delivered the best fuel efficiency and still does.  When new and in stock form, I could squeeze a consistent 23-plus mpg running unloaded with the engine between 1600 (the OE torque peak point) and 1750 rpm.  A steady 1900 was okay for 20-21 mpg.  Over 1900 rpm, to this day, has the fuel efficiency dropping steadily and dramatically...the faster the crankshaft speed, the greater the fuel use.  

A good friend and former Jeep Engineer, very familiar with the Cummins trucks like mine, says it's all about the physics of wind resistance and speed.  Too much of either will destroy fuel mileage.  I believe him and have stopped looking for a Holy Grail fix to get my mileage anywhere near what the truck/engine did stock...

Try capping cruise rpm to the rated torque peak point for the naturally aspirated 6.2L diesel.  I try to use this formula in each gear as well.

Moses

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Hi Moses

ive been busy sorted out the rust & painted it in bed liner see 3rd pic for the texture should prove to be good strong bush proof paint ive got to swap the hood yet the other 1 is better & i painted it on tressels

cheers  ian

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I like it, Ian!  Good permanent solution for brush scratch resistance, bed liner can often be "repaired" as well.  Smart!  How did you apply it?

Locally, we call brush scratches "Nevada pin striping".  I'm sure you have a ephemism at your region...I really like the look of the FSJ!  The color is a neutral tone, should have more resistance to fading and UV damage.

Moses

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Hi Moses

yes we call them bush pin stripes over here

i sprayed it with my spray putty gun about 3mm nozzle 

this type of coating is becoming more popular on vehicles that spend alot of time offroad and it also hides a few sins

cheers  ian

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Makes sense, Ian...They're doing this on brush buggies/rock buggies here as well.  I've seen 4x4s on the Rubicon Trail with bed liner "paint jobs".  Very practical on your FSJ that you use for long outback trips!

Moses

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managed to get time to put the last few thing back on & get it out of the shed this weekend ill take it for a beach run next weekend its fishing club weekend

cheers  ian

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Ian, this really looks "purpose built" for the outback.  I like it!   The snorkel is functional and attractive without excessive cost...very innovative.  The 'roo bar, winch bumper and running board combination should prove functional, it's ruggedly built and fits well.  Boards should protect the sills in the deep sand and mud...How much does the bumper/winch with boards weigh? 

You mean business with this outfit.  Nice work!   Your fishing venture will be a lot of fun, with the practicality of catching and eating fresh fish...Have a great time, we''ll look forward to your photos!

Moses

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