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I just installed the '83 22R I got for my '81 4X4 pick up. I have some minor problems to sort out on it.

 1-Since I got the truck to run,it seems to run strong,but idles like it has at least one dead plug. I had replaced the distributor with the one from my '81 engine,which worked fine,so I wouldn't have to change the wiring plug to fit the newer engine. I set the timing at 10 degrees,but I'll have to pull the distributor and turn the shaft a tooth to reach the 12 degrees I want. After I noticed the rough idle,I replaced the cap,rotor and plug wires with those off my old engine,which only had about 100 miles on 'em since new. Didn't help,so I changed to my old plugs,which also had only 100 miles on 'em. That got me a smooth idle for about 6 seconds,then back to the rough idle. If I poke the throttle,it hits strong on all four,but if I float the engine at any RPM,the roughness comes back. This engine shows around 60 psi oil pressure cold,about 30 warm,and no visible smoke or leaks. I intended to run a compression test,but the hose for my compression gauge has gone missing,along with the adapters.

2-Can I run it with just the distributor's advance tube connected and the retard line capped? These two lines and the power brake hose are the only vacuum lines currently being used. every other vacuum port is capped or plugged. There's no smog pump or Cat. Converter on the truck.

3-What kind of a bag of snakes would it be to convert this truck to a normal turn signal flasher? The combination turn/emergency flasher relay hasn't been very reliable and is quite expensive to replace.

   Speed

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Speed...As for the strange roughness and also the vacuum advance experimenting, use a timing light to verify what's happening with the ignition while the engine is performing poorly.  (Stay well away from the fan or remove the fan belt and run the engine cold if you plan to rev the engine with the vehicle stationary!)  See whether you have a timing or clear misfire error, reflected at the timing light.  If so, I would look for distributor shaft or bushing wobble that is affecting the module and pickup.

The turn signal/emergency flasher wiring could be explored.  If wiring is similar to a conventional, common flasher and hazard lights circuit, you may have a way to go here.  I'm suspect this won't be the case, as the four-way hazard lamps likely follow some kind of Toyota engineering scheme.

Moses

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Well,I got the vacuum hose dilemma solved,got the distributor clocked so #1 is in line with the vacuum advance and set the timing at 12 degrees BTDC. This flasher unit operates both the turn signals and the emergency flashers. Looking at the wiring diagram,it'd be a monster to re-engineer. Decided it'd be cheaper and easier to just pay the $36.00 for the correct flasher unit,when I can,and call it good.

   I DID notice the exhaust manifold gasket leaks pretty bad,so next payday I'll be replacing it;the exhaust leak might have been part of the rough running. (the psychological part.)

   Speed

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As it stands,I've installed a Weber carb on the engine,which seems to have improved the running markedly,though it still has the "tugboat" sounding idle,to a lesser degree. I'm looking at checking the compression next (I can't believe I haven't checked it yet-maybe I DID and it was okay....)followed by adjusting the valves. I ALSO changed both 22R engines over to 10si one wire alternators that make 105 amps,though the kits I used require mods to the adjustment brackets. The one on the '82 truck I'll be eventually swapping my axles into required offsetting the "J-bracket" outward an inch away from the alternator to clear the cooling fan,but works fine otherwise,and the one on the '81,which I'm driving now,would have the adjuster running into the power steering pump,so I engineered an a spring loaded arrangement that connects to the fenderwell. Both alternators/mounts work fine.   Next project is installing new 100W. H-4 headlights,as I'm getting tired of driving by feel at night.

   Speed

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Innovative approaches...The Weber is altitude sensitive and generally needs jetting for the altitude/locale.  Another issue is float/seat pressure.  Keep fuel pump pressure within the limits for the Weber, usually 4 to 4.5 psi or so.  Look up the specs for your particular Weber series.  Flooding will result otherwise.

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Yeah,the instructions for the carb conversion say SEVERAL times to try to keep the fuel pressure below 3.5 psi,and I figured the stock fuel pump wasn't likely to run significantly more than that.

   Saturday I had a guy at the Garage (working on his own truck,off the clock) make some adjustments, and while I don't think it runs BETTER,it certainly runs differently. I KNOW I need to re-adjust the choke,he messed with it a lot,and he found a couple of adjusters (?) that don't show on any pictures/diagrams I've seen. I'll set the low speed mixture screw back to specs and try to get the idle screw adjusted again. It WAS idling a little fast,even with the adjustment screw backed all the way off,which indicates an issue according to the instructions. I was going to try another couple of degrees of advance and see where THAT leaves it. Running it as it was delivered,it initially ran right up to 70 mph,but then developed a miss;I kept backing out of the throttle,but it didn't improve much,so I stopped. it idled okay so I drove on over to Carlin,trying different speeds,but was marginal at best.  Coming back to Elko,I discovered it'd run pretty good at about 60 in 4th. I upshifted to 5th and EASED it up to 70,which it ran fine at,but any more throttle and it'd start to act up again. Even with all that,it gor 20.7 mpg.

This carb seems pretty touchy,but I hope it'll tune in without re-jetting it. So it'll be:

re-set the choke blades

re-set the fast idle

set the low speed mix within specs,

set the idle speed to around 750 rpm if possible-if it won't idle down enough,advance the ignition timing a couple of degrees.

THEORETICALLY,that'll make it run well again,right?

   Speed

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Speed...Glad you're aware of the PSI limit for the Weber.  It's even lower than I thought, good that you have the specification of 3.5 PSI maximum.  If the stock fuel pump puts out too much pressure, there are inline pressure regulators that can be manually adjusted to the desired pressure.  This has been the time-honored way to damp down pressure on these Weber installations.  On Jeep CJ/YJ 4.2L engines, the AMC inline six fuel pump is in the 6-7 PSI range, which can wreak havoc on a Weber float and needle.  If pressure is too high, a Weber will over-fuel the engine.

Sounds like you have a vacuum leak, maybe a good one.  When backing the throttle stop screw out completely, if the engine continues to run fast, that's a sign of air entering the A/F stream from somewhere.  If not a vacuum leak, you may be pushing too much fuel due to excessive fuel pump pressure as we've discussed.  Check the fuel pump pressure.

Check for a vacuum/air leak.  A simple approach is a can of WD-40 or a similar low volatility petroleum base spray cleaner.  (Avoid hot areas like the exhaust manifold!)  Spray a light mist around the carburetor base, the intake manifold junction with the head and the vacuum hoses.  Engine speed changes indicate a leak...Cap off or plug vacuum lines if you suspect a vacuum hose or device leak.  See whether that helps identify the leak(s)...Even the brake booster can create a vacuum leak, often a big one if the diaphragm or check valve bleed off.

Moses

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