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Hi Moses,
 I read a lot of post with regards to the E40D Trans. I'm adding mine to the list. I have a 95' F-150 4WD, it has a 351 with the E40D. I do not believe I am "Hard" on my truck but if the trans. is bad this will make number 4. The truck has 150,000 until I bought it at 114,000 I don't think it pulled anything. Within a couple of months of buying it, seals blew loosing all the fluid. Replaced with a remanf. unit 20,000 and one year and ($2400) it goes again. This time no remanf. yard tranny, low mileage I have them check it over new filter, oil and ever it takes make it right. 3 months. 3000 miles warranty 14,000 miles, here we go again. By this time I have so much wrapped up in trans, that I go the cheapest route another yard trans, 3 months, 3000 miles. This one lasted 4 months and 1500 miles. So here is where I'm at, fluid level is correct, no burnt smell, at low speeds it's like when a manual trans. clutch is slipping engine starts to over rev., no additional speed, let off the gas and "catches" a little when I finally get up to speed it's better but as soon as I slow down....it was fine when I parked it 2 hours later this. A couple of questions, could an electrical problem be at the core of these issues, do the "codes" show up anywhere that (I) could see them or is a special scanner required? Are the E40D really that bad? what are their reputation, finally why would they replace something as great as the C6. Thanks for any help. Sincerely,

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AllFords57...Thanks for joining the discussion.  I'm curious about the moniker, are you a Y-block era Ford guy?

Your questions really make sense.  First off, the E4OD is not a failure prone transmission by design.  I believe we're dealing with sheer numbers here and also the age of these units at this point.  If you pore through the various E4OD exchanges (use search box keywords "E4OD Transmission" without quotes) at our forums, you'll find discussions about a variety of electrical, vehicle speed sensor, solenoid, speedometer unit, plug contact and other maladies.  Some replace the speedometer cluster, others dig into the VSS, there are other electronic issues that occur with regularity, especially as vehicle mileage accrues.

I recommend pursuing simpler solutions first, one at a time, following the pattern of electrical and electronic possibilities. As an automatic transmission guy from "the day" forward, I suggest that traditional concerns always prevail:  1) adequate clutch apply pressure, 2) valve body distribution of fluid under pressure, 3) governor (or solenoid) function, 4) throttle pressure (mechanical linkage adjustment or electronic/electrical interface), 5) sufficient fluid pressure and volume at the right time and place.

I am a strong advocate of fluid pressure tests.  They have been outlined in the factory shop manuals for as long as automatic transmissions have existed.  There are external access pipe plugs on the transmission case, and testing the fluid pressures in each of the gear ranges is a dead-on way of knowing whether there is sufficient clutch apply pressure.  Your symptoms beg such a test, and frankly, any kind of slippage in an automatic transmission is very damaging.  Even short periods of "slip" are enough to fry the clutch packs.  

If you drop the transmission pan, I would like some photos of the debris in the pan before any attempt to clean it.  This is another quick spot check for trouble.  If there is considerable clutch friction material or, worse yet, hard metal parts in the pan, you would be wasting time fiddling with simpler solutions.  The unit needs rebuilding.

Note: I respect your reasoning about a "common problem" (electrical or whatever) that has haunted your transmission issues.  You are very correct in wanting to eliminate such gremlins before frying another transmission!

Perform these mechanical/hydraulic and linkage spot checks.  Invest in an inexpensive test gauge and safe jack stands that will support your F150 while running pressure tests.  If you need details on correct pressures per gear or actual diagnostic test procedures, I can furnish them.

As a final question, have you replaced the torque converter along the way?  With all of the used and worn out transmissions feeding fluid through the transmission cooler and torque converter, you may have a clogged transmission cooler and/or converter...Worth checking out, a clogged cooler or dirty converter could starve the transmission for fluid and create the symptoms you describe...

Moses

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Thank you so much for such a quick and detailed response. My "AllFords57" comes from a very long relationship with Fords. I do love my Ford trucks! From my first 67' w/ 352, 73' w/390, a 76', 77', 78', 91' & 95' I have to admit my love for this 95' is worn thin. My C6 comment just stems from years of being around and it seemingly being a "bullet proof tranny"  Thank s again.

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Understood, AllFords57...My first pickup was a '38 Ford 1/2-ton (last model with the mechanical brakes, a spur gear transmission, 85 horsepower flathead V-8).  I had a '55 F-100 from 1968 to 1974, restored it over time as is always the case, started with a 239 Y-block, went to Pontiac and Chevrolet V-8 swaps over time, I'm certainly supportive of a 312 Y-block engine with ECZ heads and would have built one readily.

  A '64 (last 292 Y-block) F-100 with T-98 four-speed was with us when I attended the U of Oregon.  When our youngest son was in high school and about to get his driver's license, an '87 F150 4x4 SWB pickup seemed just right with its NP435 manual four-speed and 300 CI inline six...I grew up around the FE-powered trucks and know these engines very well.

In the late 'sixties to early 'seventies, I was responsible for a fleet of light and medium duty trucks that included '57-'60 F100s and an F500.   Ford trucks have been very much a part of my work, and automatic transmissions began with the Warner/Ford iron case 3-speeds.  I've restored small-, medium- and large case B-W/Ford transmissions from the mid-'fifties to 'sixties, plus the C-4, FMX and C-6.   

The AOD and E4OD were a departure from these simpler, rugged designs, and the use of electronics and a hastily adapted overdrive hastens their issues.  In fairness to FoMoCo, this is not evident of a "weakness", as Chrysler and GM went through the same growth pangs in their advance to the contemporary 5- to 8-speed transmissions.  

An E40D is certainly on par with a GM 700R4/4L60E or the Chrysler 42RE or 46RE.  It could even be compared with the GM 4L80E or a Chrysler 48RE, and all of these transmissions have their issues.  Is the E4OD a C-6, well not exactly!  But they did stick them behind Navistar 6.9L and 7.3L V-8 diesels.

Let's see where your E40D goes, I'm here to answer further questions.

Moses

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