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I just completed a test cycle with Royal Purple's Max-Tane booster for diesel engines.  The magazine's Dodge Ram 3500 4x4 Quad Cab has nearly 140K miles on its odometer now, and the common rail injector system has never required service.  The turbocharger has also been trouble-free.  With regular preventive maintenance, fuel filter changes and periodic use of gDiesel fuel when available, there has never been the need for injection system service.

 

We have run octane boosters when taking long trips or hauling.  This year's run to Moab for the Jeep Safari plus two subsequent trips to Southern California seemed an ample opportunity to test Max-Tane.  

 

Royal Purple states that users can expect several gains from the product.  In approximately 5,400 miles of real world driving, we added six (6) 20-ounce cans of Max-Tane to conventional ULSD fuel available in our Western market.  This equated to 120 ounces of additive for 300 gallons of fuel.  The safe maximum usage calls for one ounce of Max-Tane for each two gallons of fuel, so we leaned toward the maximum to produce the best overall benefits.  For the first part of the testing, including the round trip to Moab and nearly 2,000 miles of driving, the additive was at peak ratio.

 

Categorically, these were our findings:

 

1)  The engine's performance was more responsive, with noticeable increases in acceleration and overall throttle response.  Throttle was "lighter" at cruise.

 

2)  Fuel mileage was slightly improved.  This was not surprising with 4.56 gears and 34.5" diameter tires, as the engine is operating beyond its optimal rpm range at internet cruise speeds.  Minimal mileage gains were expected.  Testing revealed a mileage increase of 4%-5%.  This would likely improve with proper final drive gearing, and we would gladly review the product further after either changing to 4.10 gears or installing an aftermarket overdrive.

 

3)  This engine has always started well.  The cold start was immediate, regardless of ambient temperature.

 

4)  Parked overnight in cold weather did not present issues.

 

5)  Tailpipe smoke was reduced dramatically.  Upon hard acceleration, there was an absence of the usual black smoke, and this 2005 chassis neither requires nor has a catalytic converter.  The tailpipe output has been visibly cleaner under all driving conditions.  Worth noting, though, we did not pull a hefty trailer during these tests.  In a future test, I would like to check the tailpipe emissions under heavier loads.

 

Overall, this "six-pack" of Royal Purple provided a major cleaning of the top-engine and noticeable reduction in tailpipe pollutants and visible smoke.  The performance was tops, it was obvious that the cetane level improved measurably.  I would highly recommend this product for "tuning" a diesel engine.  The top-engine, valves, fuel system and injectors clearly benefited from the use of Royal Purple Max-Tane.  

 

I'm glad we serviced the engine at this level.  Injectors, combustion chambers, valves and the exhaust system need this kind of treatment.  The inline six, 24-valve ISB Cummins 5.9L with common rail fuel injection, by design a commercial medium duty truck engine, requires this kind of attention.  Savings would be measured in increased engine life, fuel efficiency and less fatigue and wear to critical parts.

 

Moses

 

Royal Purple's stated gains:

 

"MAX-TANE PERFORMANCE ADVANTAGES"

  • Increases cetane number by 8 [depending upon ratio of additive to fuel]
  • Increases fuel economy by up to 10%
  • Improves engine startup and reliability in both warm and cold temps
  • Improves cold flow by preventing gelling
  • Cleans deposits from fuel injectors, combustion chambers, intake valves deposits and piston crowns
  • Provides lubricity to entire fuel system
  • Reduces smoke and odor

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  Great review Moses!!   I am a big believer in fuel additives and the diesel market had been lacking options. I have tried everything from F-bomb, F-bomb Ice, Hellfire and Power Service and a few others that I cant remember. I have had no complaints on any (ill effects if you will) but its hard for a short daily driver like myself to determine positive results.

 

Problem is I don't take any manufactures word for it. Why? Because "your" results may vary lol. Well that's true but sometimes marketing can be misleading. Companies like Royal Purple have more to protect than some sales like that of F-Bomb and Hellfire. Not that those are bad products but I believe they are produced by someone else and just relabeled and distributed. Maybe they have their own ingredients but I'm not sure.  

 

  In your review the biggest thing that sticks out to me is the reduction in noticeable tailpipe smoke. That, to me, shows a more efficient and complete combustion cycle. That alone should lead to more noticeable gains in both power and mpg's. I know when I look in the mirror and see the smoke its just wasted fuel going out the pipe, handfuls of money if you will just getting tossed into the wind. I have always tried to keep my tunes down to a haze at best. Does it cost me a couple horse power on paper?? Probably, but those numbers are irrelevant outside of bragging rights with your friends..  

 

 I'm a fan of Royal Purple because of other products they sell that I have used with success. I'm glad they have ventured into the diesel community and I cant wait to order some. I assume you plan to continue use beyond your testing phase or do you have others you plan to test?

 

 I would also like to see more info on its cold weather capability. Mainly anti gel results. I know most additives have a summer and winter blend. I don't have a grid heater in my truck any more and I rely on a block warmer and fuel additives for winter operations (that and synthetic oils in the engine). To date 0 problems but Midwest winters really don't get as bad as the northern diesel guys do. We rarely get to 0 at night.

 

 I have a completely new fuel system in my truck. Everything from lift pumps, to dual CP3's and injectors. That's a lot of expensive fuel parts that need protection by means of lubrication. Lots of those parts have close tolerance moving parts that will wear out fast if not protected. I cant express enough the importance of adding these additives to your fuel.

 

Thanks again for the review. I plan to try it out and see if my results may vary ha-ha..

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Megatron...Pleased to get your feedback and comments.  No downside whatsoever with Max-Tane. The pipe is still clean as the final mix dwindles.  I would surely consider a regimen of this product and look forward to testing it further when my gearing aligns better with the Cummins 5.9L power dynamics.

 

On that note, I had an insightful conversation with a diesel friend who noted that increased rpm requires more boost.  Boost means fuel stuffing and burn, presumably.  What is your experience around the variables of rpm, boost and fuel burn?  You've made many improvements in the Cummins engine and turbo functions, how is fuel flow and consumption impacted by the single factor of rpm?

 

This is a somewhat awkward question since my low gearing (4.56/high numerically) also decreases engine load.  I'm curious about the relationship of rpm and boost to fuel stuffing and mileage.

 

New topic thread here?

 

Moses

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  That will be better addressed under a different topic so we keep this one about the Royal Purple Max-Tane. The way I see it, if you have results on a somewhat stock configuration of air and fuel delivery, then by math I should see results+. Ultimately I am stuffing more air into the cylinders and adding an increased percentage of fuel over stock, so the results for power should be up, as for fuel mileage it should be??

  

    Its hard for me to say that more RPM's require more boost because I think that's a bit more complicated than that. More airflow is correct, but I still limit my boost to 40 PSI, for now. To me boost is a measurement of restriction. You have X amount of manifold pressure due to air getting held up in the intake flow and you regulate this by means of waste gating the turbo. I mean to me 40psi is maintained during a valve open event and held until the next event. Well, I could get 35-40 PSI out of the factory turbo with 325hp and now I still get 40 out of the 64.5mm turbo which is probably closer to 600hp. The difference is flow. Now I can flow a few hundred more CFM at the same PSI (during the valve open events) so in short its complicated and everything must be considered haha. This will need a big ongoing discussion for sure..

 

 I have noticed an increase with MPG (17.7) and power under 65mph/1700rpms, but currently anything over shows no gains or loses in MPG, but huge gains in power up to redline. I still have stock gearing but that's about to change when I get new tires. Got a gear swap planned thanks to your videos in the how to section lol.

 

 Give me a few weeks and I will try to put an new topic together on performance parts vs. power vs. mpg. Or if you have a good start I can add to what you post. I have a trip to the dynamiter planned in the next few weeks so I should have some reliable data to share on my current configuration.  

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Looking forward to your dyne results, Megatron!  Lots of mods on your engine and a rugged transmission upgrade.  The Hamilton camshaft and induction mods will show up.  Are you doing engine management software tuning at the same time?

 

Would like to discuss boost and its impact on fuel efficiency, including the relationship to engine rpm.  Fully agree that engine load is the wild card here.  Boost is a general response to load.  Since we're talking turbo diesel, not naturally aspirated, the fuel savings equation should take boost into account.  Boost does not occur unless A/F mixture is correct.  Does boost demand an increase in injector flow?  (We're talking CRD with our 5.9L HO engines or a 6.7L ISB.)  Fuel flow is regulated electronically, based upon a number of variables:  engine rpm, boost, A/F for load, load per se, engine temperature, etc. We all know that the unburned tailpipe emissions under heavy throttle imply plenty of fuel available.  This does equate to poor fuel mileage, too.

 

When you have time to launch into this subject, go for it!  I'll be glad to discuss.

 

Have you considered an overdrive?  I'm still batting around the Gear Vendors option for 2WD mode.  Later automatic transmissions are 5-8 speeds forward, we're limited to four speeds.  Do we need the split ratios and additional overdrive?  I sure like the 4.56 axle gears (with 34.5"-34.6" tire diameter) when towing.  That's the only time, though!  Don't need the amped acceleration the rest of the time, the ISBs have plenty of torque without the need for lower (numerically higher) axle gearing.  If you do drop to lower (numerically higher) axle gearing, would an overdrive be practical, too?

 

Moses

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Thanks for sharing the review Moses. My friend is about to buy the same and was asking me about the Royal Purple Max-Tane.

I will now let my friend know about the reviews posted by you.

 

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