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hello to all out there, im new to this. i have found a scout on my girlfriends property, it still has the vin plate under the hood, the only problem is i was unable read it from the position i was in from the front of the vehicle. it appears to be an original scout and not a scout 2, the engine is still in it ( a 4 cylinder) looks almost a slanter type engine. im not sure if the transmission or transfercase are actually there. the sticks are still in it (three sticks). it has been sitting there for quite a while, lots of trees grown up around it with nothing through. the body is pretty much rotted and rusted out. no seats whatsoever, though the frames that bolt down are there. no glass to speak of other than windshield, driver vent window and driver door glass. it has been hit in the front right. also dont know if the engine will even turn over, which i could check. i wish i had pictures but none. it was in the old orange and white but thats all i can say. i would appreciate any help that i can get. 

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Hi, RAMGUY...Sounds like an early Scout 80 or 800.  The three sticks mean the transfer case is a Model 18 Spicer, similar to period Jeep/Willys.  The four-cylinder engine is either a 152 (half a 304 V-8) or could be a 196 (half a 392 V-8).  It is a slant four. 

The color sounds familar, I saw many of these early Scout models on ranches in Carson Valley, sold by Meneley Motors at Gardnerville, Nevada.  They were popular utility vehicles.  The body is classic, there was a nice example built to the nines with a Cummins R2.8L turbodiesel transplant at the 2019 SEMA Show...This one sounds rough with the rust rot, otherwise there would be potential for a buildup or restoration.

Moses

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Thanks for responding Moses, do you think it is possible the engine and trans/transfer case might be worth anything? i know this is a pretty niche market, just don't know myself, I'm more of a muscle car guy myself and never really got into the off road stuff

 

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RAMGUY...As in any case, the condition of the engine and transmission/transfer case assembly is paramount.  You'd need to confirm that the castings are not cracked, verify cylinder seal and consider any internal engine rust from the vehicle having set so long.  Gear assemblies must work properly and seem intact, spinning freely and so forth.

You can likely get values from a recycling yard or, better yet, outlets like Super Scout Specialties.  Give them a ring and share what you have to sell.  Frankly, most of these vintage Scouts wind up modified and few get painstakingly restored to their early, original condition.  Values have come up, and that makes restoration more attractive.  There is an increasing interest in certain stock vehicles, though Jeep and Scout enthusiasts have traditionally modified their vehicles.  Slant four I-H engines are unique and reliable, some even factory turbocharged, but they are generally not a high demand item.  A complete turbocharged engine might be prized by a restorer.  

The earlier Scouts had weak rear axles and closed knuckle front axles like Jeep.  The 3-speed transmissions are not stellar.  The Model 18 transfer case is a side-drive unit and often gets tossed when both the front and rear axles get swapped.  You're a muscle car guy.  Who restores a 1955 Chevrolet Model 150 six-cylinder, column shift three-speed car to OEM (stock) condition?  That's the early Scouts.  The evolved 800 and 800A have more cache than the original 80.

Determine the axle and transmission types.  Super Scout Specialties can help you identify parts and decipher the I.D. plate and model year.  You may find someone desperately in need of a whole donor vehicle that has a rusted out body.  He or she would make the best buyer and quickest way to get the Cornbinder out of the yard.  Be clear, these vehicles hold value for those of us who appreciate them—and better yet, someone needing parts.

Moses

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