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Hi Moses i just couldnt resist this little beast it was in fairly good order just needed the floors & a cab mount repaired & some of the paint was peeling off but mechanically its good just had to replace the front shocks

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& here are the progress shots & i put the renegade stickers on it tonight im pretty happy with it the paint is jaguar british racing green  my brother inlaw gave me after i painted his car for him so now ive got everything sorted out ready to get it licensed ill just have to put smaller wheels on it for the inspection

cheers  ian

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Hi, Ian...If this had been a U.S. model, it would be a CJ-6, early AMC/Jeep generation at 104" wheelbase.  Engine would be either a 258 or 232 AMC inline six with the T18 four-speed or T14 3-speed transmission.  Saginaw steering gear (power or manual), Spicer 20 transfer case...Dana 44 rear, Dana 30 open knuckle front axle with drum brakes all around. 

As a genuine and highly original Australian model (right-hand drive), what is the equipment and powertrain?  The Jeep is a rare find and in very nice condition!!!  The paint matches well, and restoration of the Renegade decals is unique.  A keeper!  

What was the Jeep's history?  How did it remain in such good and original condition?

Moses

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Hi Moses it currently has a 258 but was originally a 232 & has the 3 speed & spicer20 transfer i had to replace some small sections of floor & where the floor is pinch welded to the sides 

i bought it from a guy who got it from the son of its long term owner who kept receipts for everything so it came with a big folder of receipts so it seems it was once much loved hence it great condition

i thought the renegade stickers were a nice touch with the gold looking good with the tan interior

its a bit too tall geared with the 33s on it but ill see how it goes ,ill have to put 31s on it to get it licensed so i might see how it feels & looks with them on it

cheers  ian

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Very nice rig, Ian...I'm sure this Jeep will provide years of use and fun.  The only area to watch on these pre-'76 (U.S. reference) CJs is the frame sectional design.  1972-75 AMC/Jeep CJs have open channel to the back of the front spring anchors, then the frame is boxed.  The combination of leaf springs with a rear anchor and the junction of the open channel to the boxed frame sections can lead to frame cracking just past the front spring anchors.   Ironically, the earliest 1955 CJ frames followed the M38A1 military frame design and have forward mounted front spring anchors...The '55 CJ-5 featured in my Jeep CJ Rebuilder's Manual:  1946-71 (Bentley Publishers) was one such model.

Inspect your frame, and see whether the Australian design is similar to 1972-75 U.S. frames.  If your frame is intact, watch for cracks and drive with the frame design in mind.  A broken or cracked frame is usually due to rocky off-road terrain where the axle and leaf springs drive a lot of force into the front spring anchors.  Many '72-'75 CJs have survived without a problem while the trail pounded and V-8 models often succumb to frame cracks. 

Footnote:  Your transmission is a 3-speed;  the optional T18 four-speed transmission with a compound 1st gear ratio helps slow the crawl speed and reduces off-road impact.  AMC uses a taller 1st gear ratio in many of its T18s;  the aftermarket conversion uses a Ford F-truck transmission that has a desirable 6.32:1 compound low gear ratio.  Some AMC/Jeep T18s do feature this ratio.

One solution is sensibly boxing the C-frame forward of the boxed frame sections.  (Fully boxed/plated front frame modifications with continuous weld beads leave little room for flex—and Jeep CJ frames are designed to flex.  If fully boxed with plates, the use of stitch or intermittent welds will allow some degree of yield or flex.)  Another solution is a "shackle reverse" kit that places the front spring anchors at the front and the shackles at the rear of the springs. 

The stock, rear anchor layout pushes the front axle down the road by the frame/anchors and leaf springs. With the conversion front anchors, the leaf springs and front axle trail from the frame like the rear axle layout.  This allows the front axle to lift more easily over obstacles and also improves on-road handling and steering control. 

Here is a shackle reverse kit example at Quadratec:  Warrior Products shackle reverse kit.  This kit fits 1955-75 CJs and does require welding.  You'll get the idea...

Moses

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thanks for that info Moses the chassis on this 1 is fine but the cj5 im working on needs attention so the shackle reverse kit will resolve the problem with that just as easily as repairing it to original so ill go that route on the cj5

cheers  ian

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Great, Ian...You'll notice a big difference on the CJ-5's handling.  Much more stable with that "sprint car" wheelbase!  What year CJ-5 chassis?

Moses

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