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I will be starting a rebuild for my 1981 Toyota 22R engine. Is there anything particularly "peculiar" in rebuilding a 22R? Tentatively I plan to get the valves done, and while the engine is apart I'll work on cover plates for all the exhaust components that I won't be reinstalling, hone the cylinders and install new rings and bearings. I also need a new timing cover and have one bolt hole to repair in the block. I plan to do some work on my alternator bracket too, as the one I used to install the 10si alternator was a hurry-up arrangement and is pretty flimsy. If the money's available,I'll order a 105 amp alternator for the truck too. (You might have noticed I'm sold on these. LOL) When I'm ready to install the engine, I'll be installing a ceramic puck clutch.

   Speed

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Speed...The 22R and 22RE is fundamental for an OHC engine.  Rebuilding should be no great challenge.  Valve timing is the only challenge, care must be taken to confirm the valve timing with the chain tensioner in place and the crankshaft turning to TDC on the compression stroke.  If you pass TDC, either 1) rotate the crankshaft backward 90 degrees or so and bring it back slowly to precise TDC or 2) rotate the crankshaft in its normal direction of rotation all the way through to TDC for #1 piston on its compression stroke.  Bring the piston up slowly and do not pass TDC position.  The timing chain must have tension on its pull side to accurately verify timing.

This is easier done by placing the #1 piston at TDC before installing the cylinder head and making sure the crankshaft stays put while installing the timing chain and tensioner mechanism.  Always confirm valve timing by rotating the crankshaft in its normal direction of rotation and slowly bringing the #1 piston to exact TDC on its compression stroke.  This tensions the chain on its pull side.

Always replace the timing chain and tensioner assembly during a Toyota 22R or 22RE engine build.  A shop manual or aftermarket rebuild book will help with your project.  On eBay, there should be many used manuals available for the 22R/22RE era Toyota engines.  A guide that focuses on your Toyota model would be more detailed, something like the books  How to Keep Your Toyota Pickup Alive (Muir Publications' classic) or Bentley Publishers' service manual.  Of course, there are also Toyota factory service manuals from that era, though somewhat rarer and often more expensive...If you have specific, unanswered questions, I have a number of Toyota reference books and can walk you through a problem.

Moses

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The engine I'll be working on has about a month of driving on it since I installed a new double row timing set with the heavy duty sliders and tensioner.It ran great when I was done but leaked oil from the timing cover-I had one bolt hole just below the head gasket surface that was so buggered up I couldn't make it tighten,but needed the transportation so I just kept a gallon of oil in the back and would top it off whenever I needed to drive it.

   My plan is to replace the cover with a new one (the buggered up bolt hole was finally drilled,the timing cover was drilled,the block was half-ass threaded and a larger bolt was used.-not proud of my work but hey-it was below Zero out there...)

   Anyway,I got the timing figured out and got that to run right,but the compression was low,due to 300K + on it without a rebuild. It ran good oil pressure so it won't need the crank machined-I believe the engine had one piston replaced and the cylinder sleeved at around 100K or so. I don't intend to get too extensive on this engine,just a basic ring-n-bearing,and have the head freshened up,and of course a new clutch.. I MIGHT invest in a new carb, (probably a Mikuni) but that depends on how deep into the wallet the rest of the work takes me. (BTW-Not too impressed with the little rectangle Mikuni air filter-do they offer a bigger one,something that uses a fairly common filter? Or,if there's some sort of adapter maybe I can engineer a remote filter.

   Speed

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Speed...Would be helpful to make more air flow volume.  The aftermarket Mikuni filter would be okay in an urban or asphalt racing environment.  It would be clogged in two miles of roiling Nevada alkaline washboard dust.  For Nevada backcountry, I'd want more filter area and a closed canister filter more like the OEM Toyota filter---without the grille snorkel.

As for OEM filters with a grille intake snorkel, many 22R engines seized from hydrolocking when stream water sucked through the grille snorkel, the air filter and the intake manifold.  At least the Mikuni filter would be at engine height, but open faced air filters are also highly vulnerable to sucking water---ending in hydrolock. 

Nothing can snap or bend a 22R connecting rod faster than plunging from a stream bank into the stream with the engine revved.  A pond crossing works nearly as well.  Good idea to avoid hydrolocking.

Moses

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Yeah,I see what you mean. I was considering something more like an air box from something like a Dodge Diesel (because I have one) connected to the carb with a flex tube (If I can find a good fitting connector for the carb). I'm not too worried about flooding the engine,I got my indoctrination on the down side of those while my friend and I were fording the south fork of the Humboldt about a week before Christmas one year in his Jeep. We'd made the crossing a half dozen times before with no problems,but this time was different. A property owner somewhere out there decided to "remodel" the crossing,leaving the water depth about 3 feet deeper than before. The J-10 sank to where the river water reached the bottom of the dash,but with the thrashing to get out it was up to the windshield before we carried his guns to shore and started walking back to town. The next morning we went back to retrieve the Jeep. It ended up taking 3 other 4X4's and about 300 feet of chain. I steered the Jeep which was towed by a 3/4 ton Suburban. The Jeep was frozen solid and just skidded the tires for about 500 feet until the wheels started turning. VERY slow trip to town.

   To revisit a prior post,I discovered a Weber carb I was given a couple of years ago,so I might go with that. Dutch tells me they work well on the 22R and provide very good mileage. Of course the same concerns apply.

   Speed

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I like the Dodge diesel air box, plenty of CFM flow, for sure!  The Humboldt South Fork Jeep adventure would be an indelible lesson.

Weber carburetors are popular retrofits for Jeep inline sixes and Toyota fours.  Make sure the unit is the right bore size and CFM flow for your 22R application.  Get some numbers off the unit.  Check the jet size to get the right tune as well, altitude can be a factor with these touchy carburetors.  You likely would be best tuning for 4000-5000 feet elevation unless you plan trips to Death Valley.  I would imagine your Elko County use would be 4K feet or higher.

When setting up the Weber, use a fuel pressure regulator to adjust pressure down.  These float systems have very light seat pressure, and the full pressure from a mechanical or electric fuel pump is usually too much.  The Weber limit is typically 3-3.5 PSI.  See what you're getting from the Toyota mechanical pump.  Verify the right pressure setting for your specific Weber.

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I guess if it'd help,I could build an intake hose from the inlet of the air box to the top of the windshield on the right side,but it'd sure be UUUUUUGLY.  (LMAO,realizing that as banged up as this truck is,how could an air intake hose possibly make it look WORSE?) Rather not do this though,it'd be wasted effort. I'd want to relocate all my breathers for the diffs,TX and T/C before messing with crossings,besides,I need to do brakes and all seals on the diffs or they'd fill with water and sink like the Titanic .

This carb is missing a couple of pieces of linkage,so I might just order a "kit" (if I can remember where I FOUND a "complete conversion kit"),with the correct carb,adapter,set of main jets and I can get a pressure regulator like I used on the GMC (set at 3-1/2 #) for around $15.00. I'm sure Weber Tech can tell me what main jets work between 4000 feet (Reno) and 6000 (surrounding areas near Elko). Elko is at 5100 feet,the top of our flag pole is at a Mile high,and Lamoille Summit is 6000 feet. If I go to my likely extreme,Spruce Mtn. is at 10,262 wretched feet. I know that because I read it on the Geological Survey marker about 100 feet from,and 20 feet below the site I maintained the Generators in,and that I walked off that hill many times,for various reasons. (Snow cat won't start,truck won't start,helicopter crashed,snow cat broke,Repair helicopter crashed,truck broke,etc.)

   Can't say I miss that.

    Speed

 

 

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Lot of cool set ups there. All I really need is the initial elbow from the top of the Weber carb;I can work out the rest of it.

   Speed

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Hi Moses;

   I think I have this filter thing figured out. All I need is a used Weber air filter base and lid,and I can make a canister from sheet metal,high enough to accommodate a pipe the right size for a flex hose to fit over it and be clamped on,probably 4 inch or so,probably squeezed down to an oval shape to make for more hood clearance. Connect the flex hose to the air filter housing and it's done. BTW-the engine's sounding and running worse,so I'd better start gathering parts to do the rebuild.

   I had my spare room rented for a short time by a young couple,but the Husband repeatedly violated the "NO problem drinkers" part of the agreement,and the Wife threw him out without any word from me. A few days later her friends in her Church invited her to live with them for free,so she left too. (I can't blame her-I would have gone for a free room too.) I was looking forward to using the rental money to get the Yota and the GMC done,but now that'll have to wait for a while. Anyway,as soon as the room is occupied again I'll start buying the parts.

   I'm going to do the brakes first,then get the carb and related parts,then the clutch,then order the ring-n-bearing kit, then get the head done (Milled if needed,valves done,new parts as needed),and finally do the rebuild. Once it's done,it shouldn't take much more than a weekend to swap the engines.  I know the trick for installing and tightening the bell housing bolts now. If anyone out there has an exhaust header for a 22R they don't need,I can work up a few bucks to buy it.   (I can't BELIEVE how the price has gone up for a new one!) With these things taken care of (and possibly replacing the shocks,which all look like the ones the truck was born with),the truck will be roadworthy to travel in.

   Speed

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Speed...Ups and downs but moving ahead!  Good plans for the engine.  Watch Craigslist for a header, even with freight it will be cheaper.  Should be parts like this floating around, headers were very popular in the day, Downey made a header for the 22R/22RE and likely sold thousands of them!

Moses

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