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   Hi all! :D

   It's good to be back! My computer melted down and I lost ALL my contact info for EVERYBODY-even my utilities,but I'm getting everything back,on a donated computer.

   I'm not sure whether to put this here or in the Jeeps Forum. I have a 1981 Toyota 4X4 pick up,but the whole cab and bed is not only rusted out,it was rolled back around '84-5. Everything still works,the left door is bent badly enough it's hard to shut or roll the window up or down. I have a plan though.

   I've located a couple of mid 50's-early 60's Willys Jeep pick ups,one is just the frame,cab,bed and front group-no drivetrain at all. I still have to look it over closer. The other one is,from what my friend tells me,a complete truck less the engine. What I want to do is strip the Yota down to frame and running gear,and use a Jeep truck body on it. I believe the weight,length,width and track is compatible. I'd use the Jeep heater (MUCH less complicated),Yota clutch and brake pedals,possibly Yota wipers and except for the Jeep speedometer use aftermarket gauges and switches and maybe the Yota bench seat. The big Q on the bare Jeep body is rust-it came from about 50 feet from a lake,so I'm assuming I'll have to at least put floors in the cab and bed,it might be worse.

    I think I have a relatively good handle on what I need to do here.

Has anyone done this conversion? What would you expect to be the hard-to-make-work areas? I'll need to locate a converter for the speedometer cable-Toyota transfer case to Jeep gauge. If I can't find a way to use the Toyota wipers,I'll have to find used linkage etc. and order an electric conversion kit from Newport Engineering ($$$) I'm pretty sure I can make everything else work.

   Speed

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Hi, Speed, welcome back...You have quite a project in mind.   First off, your '81 Toyota pickup is either 101.8" or 110.2" wheelbase.  The Willys Jeep 4WD pickup was officially a 118" wheelbase, so there's a frame length issue from the get go.  Here are the frame dimensions for a Willys Wagon or Pickup.  Note the frame width differences for F134 versus 6-226 engine and 2WD versus 4WD.  You would be smart to take actual dimensions of the body, wheel well openings and body mounting locations.  Compare this with actual dimensions on the Toyota pickup.  Taking these measurements before you commit to the project would be a wise place to start:

Willys Pickup and Station Wagon Frame Dimensions.pdf

Others may be able to add details, I would suggest you measure the body width and mount points and compare them to your Toyota.  This wheelbase difference is an immediate red flag.  Either the Toyota frame needs stretching or the Willys bed needs shortening, and that may be only part of it.  If the front clip and cab do not square up with the engine/transmission/transfer case, you would have additional obstacles.

Moses

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The Yota is a longbed,so it looks like about 8" too short for the Jeep. I believe I can move the fenders forward 8 inches. I won't worry about 8" more bed at the back.  It appears most of the layout is about the same,so if I match my front axle to the stock Jeep location,I'm betting the rest will line up pretty close. The 22R is a pretty short motor and sits close to the radiator,so there should be plenty of clearance at the firewall. Since I expect to have to build a new floor,it won't be too hard to shape it to fit the transmission and transfer case. I do have a guy who's a GREAT fabricator,and I figure when its time to set the cab on the frame he can help me get everything located and weld up the mounts. When the cab is placed and located with a couple of mounts,I can make the floor and get it installed,then locate and build the rest of the mounts. (Hopefully I can use the Toyota mounts.) I'll go out in the morning and get some basic measurements off the yota,see how things match up. I figure,since this won't be a show truck I won't be too adverse to some "Redneck -Engineering" to make things work.

    Speed

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You like the 'Yota and have kept it.  The shortfall has been the body.  The Willys Pickup is a great look.  Problem halfway solved!

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Hi Moses;

   Dutch ALMOST has me convinced to just build a flatbed,but I STILL wanna see if I can make the Jeep pick up bed work. (It makes smoke come out of his ears every time I mention "Rednecking" something to make it fit.) I'm about 85% sure I can just take the fenders off the bed and setting the bed without 'em,then centering the fenders and bolting 'em back on with NEW holes after everything else is lined up. I don't really wanna spend time cut-n-pasting the bed to make it LOOK right. It's there to work,not look good. I know this goes against the ways of the measure everything crowd,but when the cab,bed,front group is here,I plan to just chart the wiring I might need to keep,disconnect everything lift the body off the Yota and set the Jeep front end on the trucks frame.get it attached to the frame where if fits right over the wheels,set the cab on stands and get IT lined up to the front group,build my mounts to fit,start setting up linkage for the column to steering box,mount the master cylinders,pedals and throttle and connect them,wire and connect the lights,gauges,switches etc.build the floor for it and get it mounted then work on the bed,then mount and wire the tail lights. After that I can work on the bumpers and hitch. All the other bits I can do as I go.

   I realize most people would get a ton of measurements and go into it knowing exactly how everything will fit,but I prefer to do it this way. I figure the only person I have to please is me,so if it isn't perfect,is ugly but works,that's good enough for me. Gives it CHARACTER.

   Speed

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Are you good with the idea of powering this outfit with a 22R engine?  Will the truck weigh more using the Jeep/Willys body?  Aerodynamics are nil.  Just sayin'...

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The weight should land real close to the same-the Jeep may actually be a few pounds lighter. Aerodynamics will be about the same as a barn door.  I expect to lose a couple of MPG just due to that,but it should come out pretty close. The engine I'm using is pretty tired,but the original might be fine with a set of rings and bearings-I see a kit from Rock Auto for $76.00,and I'd have the head rebuilt,that'll be around $150.00 depending on the need for valves or guides,and I'll be going for a ceramic disc clutch,for $90.00,and it might be worth rebuilding the carb for $39.00. Question-what's the going rate for re-sealing the front axle,R&R'ing the axle shafts (I have a set of very low miles replacements) and a bearing pack? I need to do at least the rear brakes and axle seals,and replace the e-brake cables. Can I bypass that load equalizer valve? I've never driven it with it actually working,as far as I can tell. (I finally took the linkage off at the axle and tied it up at different heights,and couldn't feel any change in the braking.)

   BTW-my friend says he just spotted TWO Jeep trucks in a yard in Lee. (He drives s cement mixer,so he gets to places most of us can't access.) We might go check all of 'em out when he gets his truck registered.

   Speed

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The axle reseal and shaft R&R should be around 5-6 hours flat rate time including the bearing pack plus parts.  Closed knuckle technology is long in the tooth, you need a knowledgeable shop.

A brake equalizer or lever operated proportioning valve has been popular on many trucks over the years.  Our 3/4-ton Suburbans used them.  They look primitive but serve a singular purpose: keeping the rear brakes from locking up under heavy braking.

When heavy braking, the chassis pitches forward and downward, the rear frame/body kicks upward, and weight on the rear axle drops dramatically with the weight transfer.  The rear wheels/tires can potentially lock up, depending upon the amount of brake pressure applied and how quickly.

To place a value on the rear axle brake lever's proportioning function, you would need to slam on the brakes hard (preferably with a load in the bed to increase the front end dive) and pitch the rear of the chassis upward.  If the valve/lever is set to specification, there will be less likelihood of rear wheel lockup and skidding.

Rear wheel lockup is very dangerous.  It can cause rear tire skidding and throw the vehicle into a full spin.  Stunt drivers spin a car around by using the parking brake (only) on a looser surface or wet skidpad.  The parking brake pedal or handle is modified to not lock in position; it can be released instantly...Don't try this on a public road! A rollover is possible.

Moses

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Hi Moses;

     " Stunt drivers spin a car around by using the parking brake "

   I used to do that too,it works on pavement too,but you have to be careful what car you do it with;for some reason some cars don't enjoy it much,VW's are a good example-don't ask how I know this....

Yeah,I know the purpose of it,but even knowing it doesn't work on this truck there's no issue with running without it. There's not even a kit for it or a replacement for it through aftermarket-maybe I could use one of the universal fit adjustable proportioning valves. I can get one like I put on the '54 for about $35.00.

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Speed...VW paddle axles and extreme positive camber changes are a fast track to a vehicle rollover, as many VW bug owners discovered...

If you do the universal/manual valve, it would not be proportioning but rather a fixed PSI limit/setting.  You might be able to find a "happy median" setting, but be careful discovering that set point!

The factory valve is a mechanical proportioning valve with apply pressures adjusted with a lever as the chassis/axle separates in distance.  Primitive, but it does work.  If your cell phone takes pics, post a shot of the OE Toyota valve to help others understand the premise.

Moses

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