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I picked up this 1966 Willys 4WD Pickup.  It has a good body and Toyota 3B diesel engine transplant.  The truck has a mysterious 2-piece windshield, odd for that year.  A closer look shows it was originally a one-piece, correct for 1966.  The last U.S. Willys Pickup was 1964, they still made them in Australia after that point.

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Nice bumpers.  I will likely put a Toyota bed on this truck.

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A better body than my 1957 Willys project.  Will likely work on this one instead for now.

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Diesel engine is enough for this truck, drives well and get really good fuel mileage.

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Right hand drive with signs of being built at Australia.

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VIN says 1966 build.  Below is a very interesting letter that describes how Willys made VIN numbers.

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This VIN code sheet is useful to older Willys-Jeep model identification.

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Here are the three VIN tags.

 

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Interesting and indeed a rare Willys 4WD Pickup, Ian!  The Australia Pty Limited tag shows this was likely a 230 OHC Tornado inline six before the Toyota engine swap.  You are very fortunate not to have that engine in the Jeep, it was notorious for valve and valve guide problems, had a complicated valve timing mechanism and little could be said for its throwback 4-main bearing crankshaft. 

The 230 OHC engine was a pioneer engineering effort for a U.S. truck application in the 1962-65 era.  The 230 Tornado evolved from Kaiser's Continental 226 inline six, a basically solid L-head.  Kaiser-Jeep Corporation abandoned the 230 OHC design for civilian Jeep vehicles by 1965.  The base six-cylinder engine of choice in the J-truck and Wagoneer became the outsourced 232 AMC 7-main bearing inline six, a rugged design that survived and morphed into the 258 and later 4.0L engines.  The 230 OHC survived through the Vietnam Era in the M-715 military trucks that were basically a Gladiator J-truck with mass.  AMC's 327 V-8 also became a Jeep offering in the mid-'60s. 

Which, if any, of these AMC engines wound up in mid-'Sixties Australian-built Jeep models?  I see the trademark stock Willys steering wheel in your '66 cab.  Does this '66 model Willys still have the Ross TL steering gear, or did they step up to something a bit better for Australia?  (U.S. J-trucks and the Wagoneer of that vintage were using Gemmer worm-and-roller gears like Ford and Dodge trucks did for many years.)  However, your Willys steering column looks like it leads to a traditional Ross cam-and-lever steering gear...Would you keep the cam-and-lever TL gear?  It's light duty for a truck this size and a diesel engine.  How does the truck drive?  What does a 3B diesel engine weigh?

Moses

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when trying to match up the '66 willys frame and body, I discovered a lack of frame numbers on these early aussie assembled jeeps i.e. my fsj, cj5 the 57 willys pickup & this 66 pickup

my cj10 that was built in mexico has a frame number stamped in the chassis 

yes im glad its got the little diesel its great on fuel & they are a reliable & long lived engine not sure of the weight but it drives well doesnt feel too heavy on the nose but when i put a full size tray on the back it will balance the weight a bit more

ill check out the steering to see what it is it does look to be the original setup though

as for the amc engines offered here as far as i know we got the 232, 258 l6's & 304 & 360 v8's not sure if others were used i know the 401 came in the javelin

also 60s cj6's came with the ford 6 from the corresponding year ford falcon the were called combat 6's i think it was part of the local content laws that was imposed on manufacturers in those days

cheers, Ian

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Ian...Interesting about the frame stamping numbers. My first recollection of stamping numbers on U.S. frames was AMC/Jeep era in 1972, which was by then federally mandated.  (Could have been done on later Kaiser era models in the late 'sixties, too.) 

Jeep vehicles sold off the VIN plate and often the actual date of sale.  There were many early models that sold a year or two after production and were registered incorrectly, like a CJ2A being called a 1952 model on the title and registration even though the CJ2A had been replaced by the CJ3A several years before that date.

Some states even registered earlier vehicles from the engine number, which created a nightmare if a connecting rod tossed through a block and ruined the original engine—or when a block cracked seriously in a freezing winter.  Most replacement engines came with no numbers stamped (either blank or milled off) to permit the owner to stamp the original engine/vehicle ID number onto the block.  By the 'sixties, vehicles were sold by body VIN tag numbers only, which ultimately became stamped on the frame and other parts.

Moses

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ive been busy this weekend this is the last body repair before i prep it for paint

its coming along nicely ive found a bit of motivation lately & the more progress i make the more keen im getting?

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Solid repair...Not your first rodeo, Ian!  Weld penetration looks good after the finish grinding.  Nice work...

Where is the replacement panel manufactured?  Or did you have a panel stamped?

Moses

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I bought the patch panel from Kaiser Willys but the inner piece i bent up myself

ive done the little bit of bog (bondo) work & primed it dont want it going rusty already 

unfortunately i wont be around to paint it next weekend so itll have to wait 2 weeks but ill get it in spray putty & all rubbed down after work during the week then itll be quicker when i get time to paint

cheers  ian

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A project going in the right direction, Ian!  This is a quality, permanent repair of a rust prone area.  Good that the repair piece is available, obviously there's a demand for repairing these doors.

Moses

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took the day off work today it was great painting weather & not having a spray booth i have to pick the right day & there are way too many bugs in the evening now once i can uncover the engine ill drive it out of the shed for some day light pics but im happy with it its not my best panel job but it is a 4wd

cheers  ian

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Hi Moses

its been a while since ive had a chance to do any more but me & my son inlaw attempted to fit the windscreen this morning but it would not cooperate it is the 2 piece neither of us have done either a 2 piece or a willys before but we have done plenty of other vehicle without issue this all seems backwards 

the way the rubber is the glass has to be installed from the inside but this doesnt seem possible 

have you ever replaced a windscreen in 1 of these trucks

cheers  ian

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Ian...See if this helps, the factory workshop manual approach for the Willys-style Jeep pickups.  Attached is a PDF with your information, see T-12 and T-13.  T-12 is the two-piece windshield glass installation, a two-person job for sure.

Moses

P.S.:  I recopied the document to make the 3rd page more clear.  It's T-13 section but may have some useful tips.  You'll likely benefit most from the T-12 (two-piece windshield) section.

 

Jeep-Willys Pickup 2-Piece Windshield Glass Installation.pdf

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Hi Moses thanks for that but that is exactly what we have tried the problem is that the Apillars are narrower than windshield  so with a bit of messing about & unbolting the steering column i was able to get both ends in but while trying push the center out to the windshield frame i used a little too much force & now i have to cut a new piece but i think ive worked it i think ill make a video for youtube it might help others

all the research ive done it just seems like its a pain in the but & some windshield guys refuse to touch them 

im kind of wishing i had gone with the 1 piece now but i want the 2 piece look

cheers  ian

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Sounds challenging, Ian...I guessed from the photos that this was a one-off installation but thought the OEM approach for the one- and two-piece windshields might cast some light.

So, the glass needs custom sizing, fortunately this is flat glass, something "modern" vehicles don't have.  I noticed the center rib.  Is that a piece you constructed?  Will you cover this with a chrome trim piece?

The video would be very helpful to others!

Moses

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Very cool pattern, Ian!  Reminds me of Native American petroglyphs at our local Great Basin (USA).  Australia has incredible Aboriginal artwork in the Outback and elsewhere dating back 40,000 years...Fitting theme for the Willys!

Moses 

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yes i think it suits the general theme of the vehicle well & shouldnt show the dirt too much

i canibalised a ford festiva for the sunvisors

thats the first time ive ever made my own roof liner it took a bit of mucking about & making it up as i went along but im happy enough with the results, the head liner bows came from an old toyota hilux my brother killed & left in my dads paddock

im glad of a bit of time off work to be able to get a few thing done

cheers  ian

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Hi moses

did a bit of suspension work today started at the front only to find out that the pin & bush for the pivot eye at the rear of the front leaves are not the size that is listed for this truck so i measured them & checked the sizes on Kaiser willys website it appears that i need the pins & bushes for the earlier mb,gpw cj2 3 5 etc 

so i moved to the rear & they all fitted nicely so im half way there just need to order a couple more pins & bushes

i guess the aussie assembly plant didnt want to stock more parts than they had to as they would have already had the front spring assemblies for these diffs for the other models

cheers  ian

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Hi, Ian, Happy New Year!  The headliner looks "professional", you did figure this out.  The Toyota top bows should keep your handiwork in place...

The Willys/Kaiser plant at Australia was no different than the Willys plant at Toledo.  Parts were mixed and used as available.  A classic example was the 1955-56 era CJ-5 and CJ-6.  Willys used M38A1 frames, windshields and other parts in these models.  My '55 had "reversed shackles" at the front springs, the frame was M38A1 derivative.  Actually a better design than the CJs with their front spring anchors at the rear of the leaf springs.  Mine had a one-piece windshield, many had the two-piece design from the M38A1.

Your infinite patience will see you through this project.  Glad the Toyota diesel is worthy.  An option would be the Cummins R2.8L if you hit the lottery...

Moses

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Hi Moses

weve got the windscreen in didnt manage to do a video for youtube but its in we had to cut the glass slightly smaller than original as we used laminated glass the original was tempered so we could not apply the same pressure on the glass as would have in the factory

so now all i have to do is fit the tray on the back & get a weigh bridge certificate then the engineer can inspect it ready for rego

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Ian...The windshield installation looks fantastic, this involved two-piece glass and divider is a vintage cue.  Worth the extensive effort, the windshield gives the truck an authentic "look"...

Quite a project,  you persevered!  Nice work...The tray/flatbed deck at the back should do it...Is the powertrain ready for the long haul?

Moses

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Hi Moses

the mechanical side of this vehicle is good engine & gearbox are fine driveshafts are good the diffs seem ok so i'll find out as i put some miles on it

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