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I bought these wheel spacers 1 1/2" and they are hub centric. What worries me is that when I put one on the nuts they give you only go on half way like a 1/2". The 1997 TJ came with steel wheels. Is this why the studs are a little short? Is 1/2" enough with thread lock to be safe even if they are hub centric? Im an older gent so all I do is tool around,no off road or anything. Do you think I should use them? Will the hold up under just normal driving? Anyone come across a problem like this? thx for any input..

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Superwinch...If you're committed to the wheel spacer idea, contact the spacer manufacturer and share you concern.  They may have data and recommendations for safe wheel stud thread length.

You do have the option of changing the wheel studs to longer studs.  (Replacement studs in various lengths are readily available from NAPA and others.)  This is a somewhat involved process, as you need to safely press out each of the wheel studs and properly set new studs into place.  I have replaced studs using a press (off the vehicle), backing up the hub flange at the backside of each stud where the pressure applies.  The backup reduces risk of warping or distorting the hub flange.  The hubs and axle flanges must be off the vehicle to use a press.  

On the vehicle solutions include cautious use of an air hammer and blunt ended, tapered chisel...A blunt end air chisel can often drive the studs out without damage or excessive force to the flange.  Wear goggles and improvise a guide sleeve that captures the stud and chisel.  This will help keep the chisel centered without dancing off the stud end.

There are also specific tools for replacing wheel studs on the vehicle.  Here are examples:

https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-22800-Wheel-Stud-Installer/dp/B000ETUD22/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1493986879&sr=8-1&keywords=wheel+stud+removal+tool [Inexpensive solution to keep the stud centered while seating it.  This helps prevent wallowing of the flange holes, loose studs and ruining the flange.]

https://www.amazon.com/OTC-4295-Wheel-Stud-Service/dp/B009B2M3YO/ref=sr_1_4?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1493986980&sr=1-4&keywords=wheel+stud+removal+tool

The OTC tool kit is spendy but provides a solution for on the vehicle stud removal/installation.  This is for shops that have a volume of this work, mainly a brake or tire store.

Of course, the other solution is to not use wheel spacers.  Seek new wheels that have more negative offset (shallower or less backspacing) if you are running wider tires and need to increase the vehicle's track width for clearance and/or a safer center-of-gravity.  Wheel manufacturers offer a range of offsets to shift the tire centerline further outward.

Moses

 

 

 

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