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Found 27 results

  1. OK, so my daughter decided she can't afford a car right now. Probably not into the foreseeable future either, but she has released the Jeep Cherokee back to me. It is a 2001 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4.0L. This car is special. It has 39,198 original miles on it. It has electric everything and air conditioning. it has a great look in its black paint job. All original. I am the third owner and I haven't driven it far from my own dooryard. I have been meaning to do all the work to it myself, but have fallen behind in my financial situation, so I would like to put this up for sale. The bad news. It does have some rocker panel rust, and will need to be repaired or built up in that area depending on how you wish to use it. It does have a few areas of surface rust as well. The really good things about it. It purrs like a big cat. There are no codes being thrown by the computer. It heats and cools, drives and stops, and has a like new interior. Look at the pictures to see if you feel the same way I do. This Jeep needs to be put back in order and run. I'm asking $3500.00 if you cannot pick up, I live in Vermont, we will work out shipping to your location.
  2. The high cost of new vehicles has its counterpart in rising dealership labor costs. Shop labor has crept up, and more consumers find themselves working on their own vehicles. This starts with basic lube and oil/filter changes, spark plugs and an air filter. Then comes the transmission filter and the cooling system flushes. AutoZone, NAPA and O'Reilly's, much like Home Depot and Lowe's, cater to a growing number of DIY customers. Expect this trend to continue. As vehicles fall out of factory warranty, consumers make choices. While the average wage for American workers is now $24.57 per hour, the labor rate for an automotive dealership can vary from $80-$130 per flat rate hour on major service work. Minor service procedures like a lube-oil-and-filter feature deeply discounted rates, making the dealership more competitive with Jiffy Lube and a host of other fast-service outlets. Dealerships also use the lube rack as an opportunity to generate additional service work. Many gulp at paying $80-$130 per hour for service when their own wages are a fraction of that amount. Let's reflect for a moment. Compare the difference between workplace hourly wages and the dealership or independent shop's hourly labor flat rate. The professional shop justifies its rates by considering the wages and benefits paid to employees (including hourly wages or a percentage of flat rate plus half of the technician's FICA rate). The dealership is also required to pay for disability and garage liability insurance plus an attractive medical benefits package, possibly a retirement contribution, supplied uniforms plus a work environment that includes service bay lifts, a lube rack, cabinets, a tool room full of factory service tools, the facility's buildings and their overhead, electricity and heating/AC utilities, shop equipment like computers and the air system, advertising and those shop supplies not charged to customers. The tool room with diagnostic equipment and specialty tools is a large expense. An OBD-II era DRB-III scan tool alone is a spendy item. At the end of the DRB-III era, SPX rented the last of the DRB-III scan tools to shops and consumers with a $6000 credit card deposit. That was the cost of replacement for this diagnostic tool set and its accessories. Fan through the factory service manual for your vehicle and note all of the required tools. Imagine a dealership with various makes and models, each requiring a long list of specialty tools and diagnostic testing devices. So it's realistic to believe that the dealership has some level of justification for today's high hourly flat rate. Some shop personnel get paid on a flat rate basis, typically 30%-40% of the hourly flat rate, sometimes less or more. In the long run, the dealership does profit from the Service Department, which also serves as the number one customer for the Parts Department. Rather than condemn the hourly flat rate, however, consider whether you can save money by performing your own service work. Equipping Your 'DIY' Shop If you're serious about performing your own service work, the first item on the tool list should be the factory workshop manual for each of your vehicles. There is no sense performing work without clear safety standards and step-by-step service guidelines. These books or CDs will also help determine what work you are capable of performing and the tools required. Immediately clear, you will be subletting engine machine work to a competent machine shop. An automatic transmission rebuild may be within reach for some, but the tools required for a one-time job could tip the scale in favor of subletting the job. Perhaps the removal and replacement work can be a DIY task. Weigh the cost and safety equipment needed for R&R work, too. There are often universal service tools that can work in place of niche factory service tools. Harbor Freight and others now offer a variety of minimal use tools. Why pay $300 for a set of professional grade Snap-On impact sockets when the $20 set at Harbor Freight might last for many years given your occasional use of these tools. My mixed medley of socket brands includes U.S. and metric Pittsburgh (Harbor Freight) brand deep impact sockets. At the tool section of the forums, we can discuss professional tools and the less costly alternatives. Diagnostics tools are the same way. For some EFI/MPI work, a $20 OBD-II transmitter and software package for Bluetooth or Wi-Fi can work with your laptop computer or cell phone. Many of these kits get rave reviews at Amazon and can provide a wealth of diagnostics information. Such a "scanner" is actually reading the stored or live data from the vehicle's PCM/ECU/ECM diagnostic port. This information is only reliable if the powertrain controller is functioning properly. The next step up is often a used Snap-On or OTC scanner with software and adapters. Sold at eBay or Craigslist, these scan tools can include newer versions or even used factory diagnostic tools. Sometimes, creative troubleshooting with a quality digital volt-ohmmeter can get the job done. Equipping your home garage or an independent shop is a constant juggling act between safe work and professional results—while not breaking the bank with tools that will seldom see use. Sometimes, one-time use suggests alternatives like renting the tool(s) from AutoZone or removing the component to have a specialty shop rebuild it. Sublet rebuilding was once common with alternators, generators and starter motors. Local radiator shops hot tanked, rodded or replaced radiator cores. Today, everything electric or electronic has a rebuilt/exchange program or is replaced with new parts. When I worked for Cunningham Pontiac-GMC in the early 'eighties, a defective S/T truck alternator under warranty required bench rebuilding to replace the rectifier bridge or other parts. (Flat rate time for the alternator R&R was 0.1 hour; the rectifier bridge changeout paid an additional 0.2 hour.) A power steering gear or transmission was also rebuilt on a dealership bench. Every vehicle manufacturer now uses a rebuild/exchange program for warranty parts. There are instances where improvising or substituting tools may be possible. Many aftermarket tools meet generic needs. When I operated a mechanical restoration shop for classic and muscle cars, service tools for pre- and post-war cars were obsolete. I made many tools from scratch, using factory tool images from workshop manuals as my guide. You can do this, too, and the cost savings can be dramatic. Common items like floor jacks, an H-frame press or jack stands can be generic. I trust many of the Harbor Freight products, the suppliers often build equipment for major brand manufacturers. I apply my own "overkill ratings" for safety equipment, like using two four-ton rated HF floor jacks to lift the Ram truck's 5,000 pound front end. I support the truck's axles on HF 6-ton rated stands. My 20-ton HF press is good for at least 10-15 tons when following my safety margin. I expect my Harbor Freight equipment to perform safely at 50-70% capacity. These tools last a long time with this kind of usage. I also have chests with prime, spendy tools. For precision work, always use better quality measuring tools. I purchase professional grade instruments from the nearby MSC warehouse. When safety and preserving parts is essential, I use the right tools and suggest that you do, too. Taking the Plunge to the 'DIY' Lifestyle My DIY work dates back to age 14 and my Cushman/Allstate scooter. With a factory shop manual in hand, I was on it! That strategy has stayed with me ever since, and today I'm still curious and interested in new tasks. My confidence grew with experience and tool savvy. Your confidence will build on successful results and learning which tools can perform the job properly. Becoming an accomplished DIY mechanic means doing professional grade work. Without the demands of flat rate time, you can wade your way through unfamiliar territory and get satisfactory results. Time is a concern, as you will spend a great deal of time learning how to perform quality automotive service work. Time can even be a deal breaker. While tools and parts cost, your time is also valuable. Family will quickly let you know when the clock has run out. Yes, you can save a considerable amount of money by performing your own service work. The rewards and satisfaction can be substantial if you enjoy this work. Account for your time as well, however, when deciding whether the savings are worth it. Consider the learning curve, you're developing a second career if you take this work far enough. For major tasks, there's no half way. The work is too demanding, and your safety is at stake. Repairing your vehicle's ABS brake system or troubleshooting a Ford E4OD automatic transmission is way different than replacing your home's screen door or garbage disposal. There are many benefits and rewards when doing your own automotive repair and service work. Troubleshooting can be a great test of your analytical ability, at least as good as working crossword puzzles. Safety is always a concern, as pinning yourself to the floor beneath a vehicle could be catastrophic. The first order of business is shop safety for yourself, any children in the area and your spouse/helper. Gasoline is flammable. Electricity can shock. Knocks, burns, crushed fingers and lacerations that require E.R. attention are simply not acceptable. I plan to produce a full series of streaming videos for the magazine's Vimeo On Demand catalog. How-to subjects will include setting up a DIY home garage or a small independent shop, emphasizing the use of common and specialized service and diagnostics tools. Meanwhile, become familiar with shop manual language and procedures. Review the magazine's how-to videos. —Moses Ludel
  3. Hi to all, Hoping to get a little guidance! I recently completed a rebuild of the AX15 with a master rebuild kit which was uneventful. When it was completed and bench tested, it shifted rather smoothly into all gears, except reverse. It took a few tries each time, but the reverse gear would engage and the output shaft would spin in the opposite direction with no issues once it's engaged. Having read a lot about difficult shifting just after a rebuild, we thought little of it and installed it in the car. Now, we are still having the same issue, but worse. The transmission won't at all shift into reverse, and feels as if something is blocking it. There's no grinding or partial engagement of the reverse idler gear whatsoever. Even with all but the most extreme force, it still feels like there's a hard stop just in front of the reverse range. We managed to force it into reverse (luck?) maybe twice since it's been installed in the car, and it moves the car beautifully backwards with no noise, clunking, grinding, or popping, but as soon as it's returned to neutral, the same issue occurs again. We took it out for a test drive and let things get nice and warm, and it shifts wonderfully into all 5 forward gears, but the reverse is still absent. Any ideas what could be going on? Do I have to drop the transmission? The shifter isn't binding on/hitting the body or console as we've removed all that and it had no difference. 😕 Here's a video of the issue. Thanks in advance for any advice. InShot_20180312_025446985.mp4
  4. Ok, got my subscriber membership now. So, after not doing much with the jeep the past couple winters due to my snowbike hobby I jumped back in yesterday. I have to reassemble the front axle and clean the rear axle housing. I ran into trouble with the new front wheel studs that came with my new wheel bearing hubs. There is a shoulder behind the knurled section that would not allow proper press-on fit. The jeep parts vendor sold me the wrong studs it appears. Napa was able to look up studs for a scout and I was able to look at one to confirm it will work. A second problem I found was my new rotors that I purchased almost 3 years ago. I went to test fit one and found that the hub hole is too small, under 4” and it needs to be over 4”. They are for a 81-86 CJ. I’m guessing I need mid-70’s.
  5. I was wondering if anyone could give me a conservative estimate of what a running, driving, and rusted out 2005 Jeep Liberty is worth parted out? I've been told not even to expect "Wholesale" price because it's uninspectable, that's here in Vermont though, so I don't have a clue what it could be worth in an area where the value is not in a driver, but parts car. Good engine, transmission, transfer case, etc... The "Salvage Yards" are paying scrap prices for vehicles no matter the condition these days, and $150.00 isn't going to get it when the engine alone is worth more than that.Prices in the local CL are all over the place. $1000.00 for an undrivable 201,000 mile car?? Others for $400.00 to $600.00 complete. There's no rhyme or reason. Maybe you can provide some examples from your area. One question remains. What is a Wholesale price? There isn't a real answer anymore. Most people look to an auction report that the public can't see prior to dealing with a dealer. How can you devine the value of your car and the seller's car if all the "Book Prices" are useless? Here in Vermont the Southern car is king.
  6. We all need the right tools, supplies, food, water and safety equipment when traveling to remote country. Four-wheeling and motorcycle backcountry travel, in particular, require careful planning and appropriate travel gear. In all cases, safety equipment, medical emergencies, repair tools, tire repair kits, vital spare parts and other necessities can make or break a trip. Discuss and share topics at this forum!—Moses Ludel
  7. I hate to bring this up again, but I need help. I have a 1990 2.5 TBI wrangler that is killing me! I say I've been throwing parts at it, but given it's age everything I've done was either bad or well on its way. Now that almost everything has been replaced including the IAC I need help adjusting it. I assumed the IAC was in the correct position when I replaced it, but I'm suspect the PO had adjusted it when some of these parts I replaced went bad or possibly when they plated off the EGR (I replaced the egr and cleaned the egr tube) and now I find myself trying to adjust the IAC. I've adjusted it twice. The first time I was very close, but was not perfect so I adjusted it a turn more and it's acting up again. I've ready your very helpful advice, but call me slow I could use a bit more help or even pictures on how to do it the way you describe. The adjustments I made were before I found this page and I was told to just unplug it adjust it to 3500 rpm turn it off, plug it in, start it up for a minute then reset the ECU and I'd be good to go. Which is "close" to what I read here but miles away too. It did make it much better, but one more turn and it's back stalling out again. Can anyone give me pictures or better yet a video? I've hardly been able to drive the jeep since I purchased it.
  8. First, a little background. I am not a mechanic, nor am I exceptionally knowledgeable about engine repair, and certainly not restoration or replacement. I have a moderate level of experience with automotive repairs and know my way around a toolbox. I have little limitation in finance and time. Now, for my question. Essentially, I'm just wondering how possible/practical it is to fully restore a somewhat older vehicle. And i don't mean an engine rebuild. I mean literally remove every piece and replace it with a new one. Every. Little. Piece. Regardless of price/time constraints, is it possible to do this? To literally have an old body/frame but entirely new vehicle? If so, what are some potential difficulties/issues that may be present? How much would a project like that generally cost? Any tips or recommendations you might have for me as far as brands and such go? Thanks all for taking your time to help me out! *Note: For some context/additional information, I'd like to complete this project on an old 1998 Jeep Cherokee Sport
  9. Hi everyone. I just picked up a 1977 CJ5 with s 232 and a one barrel. All the emissions was removed and the evap and EGR are still present. I have only had 4. Banger and v8 jeeps. There are 3 ports on the carb. Where do the vacuum lines hook up. I want to run the minimum amount, distributor, EGR, and charcoal canister. Any help will be great. Pictures even better, the emissions diagrams did not help since most of the parts are gone. Scott
  10. Hello! I'm one of the many 2.5L 4 cylinder Jeep TJ owners who want's more power. I've thought about doing many complicated swaps. I've even thought about putting a 6 cylinder jeep TJ engine in my 2.5L. With the new Cummins R2.8L 4 Cylinder Diesel engines, I really wanted to do the swap. What things would I have to have done? I'd be having a mechanic do the swap of course, but I'm looking into pricing and if it's worth my while. Everybody says to just trade it for the 6 cylinder jeep, or trade and do the swap on the 6 cylinder jeep. I have a lot of money on my 2.5L Jeep in suspension and more, and I don't really want to just get rid of it for half it's price. I've seen people do the swaps before, I just wonder if swapping this new crate engine is possible? Even if I have to buy a new transmission, radiator, computer, etc.
  11. Moses... In your Jeep CJ Rebuilder's Manual, the spare tire mount that you installed on the 1955 Jeep CJ-5 came from 4WD Hardware. Was that a stand alone item or part of another package? I have not been able to find one on the 4WD site. I have a 1966 Jeep CJ-5 that I'm going to start modifying, restoring. Thanks, Roger
  12. Hi all, I am new to this forum, and to Jeeps in general. I recently got a 1990 Comanche 2wd, with the 2.5 TBI engine, and over the past few months have been trying to get it going. It was parked for about 10 years due to a bad transmission, and possibly the issue that I have now encountered. I am going to try to be as thorough as possible, but I am stuck and need some outside eyes. My dad is a professional mechanic with his own shop, so I have tools etc. at my disposal, but this thing has both of us stumped. Issue: I replaced the fuel pump and tank, flushed the system, along with did some wiring repairs that rats had eaten. I believe I have everything on the fuel system and electrical system correct. I can turn the key on, the pump will prime, and the engine will start, but immediately dies. I can start it, and begin "pumping" the accelerator, and it will remain running as long as I do so, but if I stop, or try to hold the accelerator in one position, it will die. It appears to have sufficient fuel pressure while running, it seems as though the injector pulse is going away before it is able to idle. I can manually ground one side of the injector, and force it to fire, and keep the engine running this way, by pulsing the injector myself, but it will not do this on it's own. I know the ISA is bad, and it is not working, but it doesn't seem like it would cause this issue? Parts I have replaced with new ones, no change in symptoms: Computer, fuel pump, fuel tank, CPS (Crank sensor), Parts I have replaced with other used parts, no change in symptoms: TPS, Ignition module, Fuel Injector, Complete throttle body, fuel pressure regulator. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I am attaching a youtube video of everything it is doing, along with a shot of data from the scanner while it running and attempting to run. For some reason my scanner doesn't pull any codes, it will only show data. Thanks, crunknastyvdubs@hotmail.com
  13. I have attached a few pictures of this transmission I have but I don't know where its from I need help identifying this transmission the only thing I can identify here is the transfer case because it has the sticker in the back its an NP "new process" 249 J This is a manual 4wd transmission I believe its an ax15 transmission but please give me your input as i'm not sure any help is appreciated one more thing from the shape of the bell housing I don't think this came of a Jeep possibly AMC or other but thanks again
  14. Hello people, I've had a hard time traveling in my YJ. Everything was ok until I stoped by a grocery store. The engine have been having some abnormal behavior, I've been smelling fuel when I shut off the engine and step out of the jeep, when the tank is not full (say 1/4 of the tank) and I open the gas tank cap it releives a lot of pressure. If I let the jeep sitting overnight, next day will give a hard starting and I have noticed that the carb bowl seems to be empty, as I can see there are no squirts when the pedal is pumping. Now, regarding the day it completely failed, it was starting and then stallin unless I give it a hard acceleration, then start moving and it would keep the engine running for a while then dies. Started troubleshooting by checking the squirts in the carb. No squirt. Disconnected fuel hose at fuel pump inlet. Completely dry. Attached an electrical reciprocating fuel pump. Same behavior after a while. Fuel filter replaced with a single outlet one to eliminate return line. Could get the engine running longer but sometimes carb was flooded and sometimes I heared the electrical pump noise which means it is empty. I've decided to get back home with the single oulet filter setup and both fuel pumps connected in line. The engine runs great even in hard acceleration when overtaking other vehicles. But if I slow down in traffic I will hear the electrical pump is getting dry again. Now at home, tryed a new fuel hose from an external gas tank to the electrical pump. Same thing. Routed a new fuel hose to bypass mechanical pump and steel line over the engine. Same behavior. I've tried removing gas cap with no difference. I've rebuilt the carburator and noted the base gasket was just with two barrel holes and no grove on the sides to let vac flow from the port that goes to canister (I think). Replaced that with the oval hole and side groves. But I'm still getting the pump dry. As this is my DD vehicle I'm in a rush to fix this problem asap. Any help will be highly appreciated. Going to drop the gas tank right now to discard pickup tube clogging.
  15. Looking for suggestions to do an automatic to manual transmission conversion on my 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee. I'm also looking to try to convert it so that instead of being an all wheel drive, it can be dropped into and out of 2 and 4wd. Thanks in advance.
  16. Looking for suggestions to do an automatic to manual transmission conversion on my 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee. I'm also looking to try to convert it so that instead of being an all wheel drive, it can be dropped into and out of 2 and 4wd. Thanks in advance.
  17. Hello Mose, Agin ill be asking you regarding the pilot bushing that will i use in my convertion, when the mechanic remover the 42 Re he didi not change the pilot bushing or the bearing and he just install the flywhell, the clutch disc, the pressure plate,of the ax 15 from a donor 1993 xy 4.0, we just change a new hydraulic release bearing, and fit it. we cut the drive shaft 2' from the rear and add 2' to front .as per mechanic advice . so the trans mission fits with no obstacle. we bleed the line , and then what happens it will not shift from neutral fo first.. the mechanic told me that our clutch release bearing moves a liilttle and the pedal is floored already. i dont whats happening here... do i have to change the pilot bushing? as we did not change it. its still the old bushing in the crakshsft. the size of the output shsft is ..750 please help me with this. . i want my zj can run so that i will enjoy drivng it with ax 15. trans. Thanks. Mario Bedayo Philippines.
  18. Hello fellow jeepers, I'm new to the forum and wanted to share my current project. I have an old flat fender that's been in the family for around 30 years that was in dire need of restoration. It's turned into a ground up, the frame was twisted and severed in the middle and the tub was all rusted out. I completely rebuilt the frame, straightened it all out and reinforced the weak areas. I didn't box the frame as I want to retain some flex. I did some extensive panel replacing and patching on the tub and built new floor pans for the front and rear. The axles are stock D44 rear and a custom built super 44 up front. I still have the Dana 18 tore apart, but ready for assembly. I had to find a shop that could replace and fit a new bushing for the output shaft. Other than that it's getting a full rebuild kit. The Jeep has a T19 from an IH, it is still in great shape and will only get a small parts kit. The engine that was in it was a tired 225 with a cracked block. I got a couple other oddfires when I bought the Jeep and decided to rebuild another 225. After going through the cleaning machine, my machinist found some deep pitting in some of the cylinders. The block was already .030 and with advice from TA Performance we took it to .070 and they ordered me some .020 Buick 350 pistons from Egge. Apparently they have seen a 225 bored .090 over without structural or cooling issues. Once I had those my shop sent everything in for a full balance. They refreshed the heads with new springs, exhaust valves+hardened seats, valve job,and new seals. I did some minor porting and cleaned up the runners to smooth the air flow. It's not a race engine but even the small improvements go a long ways. I still need to port match the heads in addition to the offy intake and the headers. I had Delta cam in Tacoma build a strong low-end torque cam. I was searching for some info last night, do you know what the combustion chamber size is on the 225 heads? Egge couldn't tell me what to expect for static c.r. That's probably enough for now. I'll post pictures in the days to come.
  19. Thought I'd share a picture of my 65. I swapped in a 2003 4.8 ls based vortec. Also a th400/Dana 20 combo. Trans has a 2800 stall converter and a rv shift kit. It has the closed knuckle Dana 44 front and the 53 rear. I did all if the harness conversion wiring myself. It turned out good. Makes a nice farm truck.if I only had a farm.
  20. I Can't believe that after owning my TJ for 4 years now, and being a member of numerious other forums that I am only just now finding this page and it's wealth of information. I Have searched around a bit, and while I have found a lot of useful info, I haven't quite seen what I'm after, so I figure that my best bet is to specifically ask, but 1st, Let me take tis opportunity to express my appreciation and respect. WOW!!!! I see a lot of questions, and a lot of great & knowledgable answers. KUDOS! Great job! Now, as stated before, I stumbled across this page earlier today while on my way to pick up a used transmission for my Jeep. I wasn't sure how to tell by sight weather or not the trans in question was going to interchange with mine. I was able to find enough info here to forward to the seller in order to determine that his trans was not a replacement for mine, which in turn saved me a 1&1/2 hour drive, & $150. As for the reason I'm interested in another trans??? Well... Let me give you as much history as possible. 2001 Jeep Wrangler, 4.0L, Auto, 60th anniv. "Extreme Edition" (I thought it was just stickers when I bought it, but after some research, I found that there is such a thing). This jeep Was in very clean shape. No signs of offroad use, or abuse. Showing only 88k miles I bought this Jeep from a local dealership several years ago. Drove fine during test drives, and on the 60 mile drive home. The next day, (saturday) I got in and upon leaving my neighborhood, I realized that it didn't want to shift from 2nd gear. I moved the shifter from D to 2 then back to D which caused a very noticable slip accompanied by a very defined whining noise. I drove around a few miles to to troubleshoot further, Stopping a couple times to check fluid levels and throttle valve adjustment, but nothing seemed to remedy the problem. Monday I returned to the dealership with the Jeep and what follows is all the history I have on this transmission. Previous owner traded for another vehicle. jeep was cleaned and put on the lot for sale. A potential buyer informed the salesman that it was not returning to 1st gear after stopping. Dealership had the transmission rebuilt at a local Transmission shop. Roughly a month later I buy the jeep and experience my problem. Jeep is returned to the same Transmission shop for repair. I was never told what was done, but a few days later It was returned to me and showed no problems for roughly 20k miles. During offroad use, I allowed water to come above the vent in the pump housing shortly before parking overnight. While checking fluids and other post offroad checks the next morning I discovered the bright pink transmission fluid. BUMMER!!! After speaking with a few local professionals, I removed the transmission and took it to a well known and competent Transmission builder in my area, who went through it and brought her back to life. Roughly 5-8k miles later I found myself offroad again, but this time involved some fairly serious & technical trail riding for a stock TJ. MAN that thing surprised me that night! But, the next day, it was discovered that my transmission was not shifting properly. Holding gears too long between shifts, not downshifting at stops. not responding to throttle input. sometimes not shifting at all without manual shifts from the shifter. I didn't have the time or money to mess with it, so I parked it for a couple months. After sitting a while, I decided to see if it decided to fix itself, and took it for a drive. At first, I found that it was better, but some symptoms were still intermittent. After 5-10 miles, they disapeared and the trans was functioning normally. I decided that my problem was quite possibly moisture in one of the connectors. another 5-8k miles, and another offroad excursion much like the last, except this time there was some water. Before long I was noticing that it had stopped shifting into 3rd gear. Not seeing any signs of water in the fluid, I limped it home, where the lack of time, money and just a general feeling of disgust let it sit for Roughly a year before I decided to mess with it again. Roughly one year later... I miss my jeep, i hate to see it just sitting around. So... I test drive it. the no shifting problem has improved, because now it will shift between the gears, but it takes some finagling between the throttle and the shifter to do so. I added a can of SEAFOAM, drove it 5-10 miles, changed the filter and cleaned the pan (there was some sediment and a little bit of stuff on the magnet), added fresh fluid, cleaned all the connectors. HEY HEY HEY!!!! We have a Jeep!!!!! working Great. No slipping, no whining, Great smooth shifts. I'm a happy jeeper. 4-5 tanks of gas later, the jeep has been sitting for about a week and a half. 10 mile drive to town, no problems. Next day, Gotta go to town again, but Jeep won't move forward or back. You can feel it drop into gear, but no movement aside from the initial pull of being in gear. input from the throttle results in a subtle whine. I as able to actually drive it onto the trailer using low range, and took it to the man who rebuilt it for me after the water ingress incident. I told him to check it out, and if go ahead if he found something that could be repaired while still in the jeep. I didn't wanna pay extra for R&R which I can do myself. He called me the next day to let me know that he could smell the burn as soon as he opened the pan, and found clutch material in the pan. He and I are both convinced that there is possibly a hairline fracture, or some other anomaly in either the case or valve body that is causing so many failures with this particular trans. As of right now we are sitting at 114k miles. After Finding this site Earlier today while searching for a replacement trans, I was compelled to ask your opinion on this matter. Any info or opinions are much appreciated. Thank you in advance. Gary Mckinney
  21. Alright I have a 2000 Chevy Tracker with the 2.0L with a 5 speed manual and 4x4. The motor is shot and I have a 2.5L out of a 1987 Jeep that I am thinking about putting in. Will the 2.5 jeep motor bolt up to the tracker transmission? Will I need a adapter? Would it be easier to swap the whole drivetrain (motor, transmission, transfer case)? Please help me out here.
  22. Happy Thanksgiving to all! I've posted before that my CJ-7 has a Cherokee 4.0L in it, but it's not really that simple Here is the history as I know it or can guess from some evidence: 1. Originally a 258/4.2L straight six with the FrankenCarb--this one was sold in California, so I'm sure it was extra-special. 2. MOPAR EFI kit added to the 4.2L. It seems this addition happened sometime after 2000, as the MOPAR labels for the kit have a 2000 copyright on them. I learned from the shop that did most of the work on this Jeep that the lady I bought it from purchased it sometime around 2001. It was owned by 1 family prior to that (1983-2000?). I suspect the Skyjacker lift and sketchy paint job happened about the same time to make it ready to sell. 3. The 4.2L finally gave up in 2014. This engine was replaced with a junkyard 1995 Cherokee 4.0L last May; engine had about 155K on it at that time. I never really knew which version of the MOPAR EFI kit I had, OBDI (with fuel return line) or OBDII from the newer models (returnless). There was also the option that they pulled a complete 1995 engine including the EFI and junked the old MOPAR kit. I just didn't really know. I've done some more research and taken some pics to see if anyone can confirm what I've come to believe. It seems like my system matches the pictures I've seen of a single rail EFI system. That would mean it is: 1. 1997 and newer 2. Returnless 3. OBDII I mostly ask these questions because I've been looking at performance options for whenever I'm forced to rebuild this engine. I really think I want to leave a Jeep engine in there, as opposed to a small block Chevy, for example. It seems like most systems (supercharger, programmers, etc.) are dependent upon the OBDI VS. OBDII distinction. With a 1995 engine, I wasn't sure which items I should be looking at. Assuming this is a 1997 and newer-style EFI kit, I assume I should only look for performance items for the newer model engines, correct? I don't think there was much other than heads (I have the supposedly better casting) that varied in those mid 1990's engines, other than the EFI/PCM. 1. Can I conclusively say this is a returnless/1997 and newer EFI kit? 2. Is this the OBDI/OBDII port I'm showing in the picture? It is about 8" down the main wire harness from the MOPAR EFI kit PCM. Regards, Case
  23. Have to get your knowledge as I am puzzled. I asked a local 4X4 shop a question -- "If I wanted to flat (dingy) tow my 2003 5-speed Rubicon, what is the correct procedure to do so?" I was advised that I cannot flat tow my 2003 Rubicon as the "gearbox does not have a true neutral position". Is that true or not? I thought that Rubicon can be flat towed. Isn't it a dead on true neutral wherein you put the gearbox in Neutral and its fully disengaged? Joe Mac
  24. Forum member Alberto from Colombia has a 1989 Jeep YJ Wrangler built at the Brampton, Ontario, Canada Plant. "Brampton" brings back great memories, Alberto! In 1988, the heyday of film photojournalism, I covered the Jeep Cup Rally Finals at Ontario. In those years, you could fly from the U.S. to Canada without a lot of fanfare (no passport required), and my flights took me from Southern California to Toronto. I competed at 1987 and 1988 Jeep Cup Rally regional events as a media driver. 1987 was the first-year of the EFI 4.0L Jeep XJ Cherokee 4x4. My co-driver was Chuck Williams, and we drove a spanking new model from San Diego to Placerville, California. My resulting cover story for OFF-ROAD Magazine depicted the new Jeep YJ Wrangler negotiating a steep and rocky, wheel off the ground turn on a Sierra Nevada trail. The next year, I did the Reno, Nevada Jeep Cup Rally Regional in a YJ Wrangler, scaling the rocks from Lockwood to Virginia City. Jeep® had just been acquired by Chrysler Corporation, and the rally finals would be held at Ontario, Canada. The finals included a visit to the Brampton Plant and chance to meet the enthusiast workforce that had come of age with AMC/Jeep® and now operated under the Pentastar banner. Our driving route for the Finals was the wooded wetlands, old mining and logging roads and stream crossings above West Nipissing. The competition day began awkwardly when my open 35mm camera case fell unceremoniously out the door of a new Jeep YJ Wrangler...The driver, unaware that I was standing outside the vehicle and reaching for a lens in the camera case perched on the passenger seat, let out the clutch to merge our Jeep with the procession. I used Nikon FE2 bodies with a full lens complement, and all of this rolled out and across the ground. Quite fortunately, nothing but one relatively inexpensive UV filter received damage. This camera equipment lasted for many years after this shoot... On assignment for three magazines, one in the U.S. and two abroad, made this a tight shoot. The country was rough, muddy and wet, and as the day unfolded, I forded icy streams afoot to catch memorable images, that eventually made covers and center spreads. One shot in particular captured a pair of controversial, square YJ headlamps that danced at the waterline of a swift moving north stream crossing. Following its magazine exposure, this color image came to life once more on the back cover of my Jeep Owner's Bible. These were 4.2L Jeep inline six powered 4x4s that never missed a beat—with their Carter BBD carburetors! We drove similar Jeep YJs over the Rubicon Trail and at other Jeep Cup challenges. As new models, the carbureted 4.2L Wranglers proved their mettle on challenging and tough two-track trails. The trip home from Canada was uneventful, though I did wonder about the images still undeveloped on Fuji 100 film. Those were the early years of X-ray baggage checks at airports, and our journalists' lead-lined film pouches got tested. There was no room for error with 3,000 miles of travel to the photo lab! All turned out well, the three publications each got unique images from that bell-to-bell assignment. The Jeep YJ Wranglers did well, too, and the journalists and drivers enjoyed the many challenges. This all shined through on the pages of magazines across the globe. Moses
  25. One sight that most folks enjoy is horses running free on their natural habitat. In the Far West, this has become more common since the Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, which originated at Nevada with the efforts of Wild Horse Annie and others. When I was high school age at rural Nevada, we four-wheeled in the Pine Nut Range east of Carson Valley, at Smith Valley and across northern Nevada. This feral horse country has been a big part of my outdoor life. The article that accompanies this HD video is available at the playlist for the magazine's 4WD Travel and Adventure Channel. We're fortunate with our ready access to wild horses. The 4WD Mechanix Magazine base at Fernley, Nevada places us within ten minutes of wild horse country. Some folks within the city limits see feral horses within their neighborhoods. Our family at Virginia City and Silver City avoid planting flowers—local feral horses will eat them! When we drive the local secondary highways at night, we're vigilant about watching out for wild horses crossing the road. Horses mixing with cars can be deadly. In a world of 24-hour news and "reality TV", there's something liberating about watching and filming wild horses in their habitat. Access to these animals has an affordable price of admission: some fuel, a reliable 4x4 or quieter dirt OHV and some decent hiking boots for a trek in the backcountry... Moses
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