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Found 16 results

  1. Hi to all, Hoping to get a little guidance! I recently completed a rebuild of the AX15 with a master rebuild kit which was uneventful. When it was completed and bench tested, it shifted rather smoothly into all gears, except reverse. It took a few tries each time, but the reverse gear would engage and the output shaft would spin in the opposite direction with no issues once it's engaged. Having read a lot about difficult shifting just after a rebuild, we thought little of it and installed it in the car. Now, we are still having the same issue, but worse. The transmission won't at all shift into reverse, and feels as if something is blocking it. There's no grinding or partial engagement of the reverse idler gear whatsoever. Even with all but the most extreme force, it still feels like there's a hard stop just in front of the reverse range. We managed to force it into reverse (luck?) maybe twice since it's been installed in the car, and it moves the car beautifully backwards with no noise, clunking, grinding, or popping, but as soon as it's returned to neutral, the same issue occurs again. We took it out for a test drive and let things get nice and warm, and it shifts wonderfully into all 5 forward gears, but the reverse is still absent. Any ideas what could be going on? Do I have to drop the transmission? The shifter isn't binding on/hitting the body or console as we've removed all that and it had no difference. ? Here's a video of the issue. Thanks in advance for any advice. InShot_20180312_025446985.mp4
  2. well its 1 thing after another lately the t5 jut spat 3rd gear today so ill be doing some research on a better alternative i still want an overdrive box so probably wont go back to the original t176 4spd i think an ax15 might be ok but ill keep looking to see whats available & strong enough cheers ian
  3. I have attached a few pictures of this transmission I have but I don't know where its from I need help identifying this transmission the only thing I can identify here is the transfer case because it has the sticker in the back its an NP "new process" 249 J This is a manual 4wd transmission I believe its an ax15 transmission but please give me your input as i'm not sure any help is appreciated one more thing from the shape of the bell housing I don't think this came of a Jeep possibly AMC or other but thanks again
  4. Trying to switch from a manual to a auto in a 96 xj. Needing to know what all I need to do other than bolt up. New computer? Different bell housing ? Also what would be the best tranny to use for this auto. It is strictly a off road toy
  5. Hi Moses I purchased your AX-15 rebuild video on vimeo. I also downloaded the AX-15 service manual before I started this project. When I started this project it was supposed to be a simple clutch install. How ever when I removed the transmission from the Jeep which is a 93 YJ Sahara. I noticed that the pilot bearing had grenaded and part of the inner race had welded its self to the input shaft on the transmission. I figured since I will have to tear the transmission down to replace the input shaft I might as well do a full rebuild since I had noticed some grinding going into 3'd gear on occasion. I ordered a new input shaft, and full rebuild kit with bearings, seals, synchro rings and what not and began the process of doing the rebuild. I followed your video to the T and verified everything with the shop manual. I got everything rebuilt and installed back in the jeep and everything worked fine albeit a bit on the tight side. The transmission shifted with no issues smoothly for about the first 5 miles. I then parked the jeep over night and when I went to drive it the next day it would grind horribly trying to get into 4th gear and would not go into 4th at all. Even if I put the jeep in 4th and then started the motor and let the clutch out it would just pop right out of 4th. There is also now a subdued but high pitched whining noise from the transmission. Any idea on what could be wrong and why it worked fine until I parked it and then everything went to the birds? The Jeep has a new friction disc, Pressure plate, Pilot bearing, Throwout bearing, New bearings, synchro's, seals, shifter bushing and seal, Transfer case was rebuilt with new bearings, new chain, new range fork, new mode fork pads, slip yoke eliminator kit, New heavy duty rear driveshaft, new Ujoints in the front drive shaft. Front and rear diff fluid changed and sealed. Tons of work to get the driveline back into good shape and now the trans has started having problems it never had before.
  6. HI! Moses < How are You Happy New Year...Can i ask your recommendation, . What model year cherokee xj that will fit for me for daily driving and sometimes off roading but not extreme. is the mnaul trans is good or automatic ? please advice me Thanks Cheers: Mario Bedayo
  7. Members and Guests...We've had some great discussion on rebuilding the popular Aisin AX15 transmission, and my 'how-to' rebuild rental at Vimeo On Demand (http://www.vimeo.com/ondemand/ax15rebuild) has received solid feedback as a resource for shops and DIY level techs! I'm pleased to see many are able to successfully rebuild and thoroughly restore the AX15, made popular in 1989-1999 model year Jeep vehicles with the 4.0L engine. The AX15 transmission rebuild coverage and our discussion here at these forums also serve other applications of the AX15, including the Dodge Dakota, some Toyota truck models (and performance car applications) plus Isuzu and GM use. There are, however, instances when a transmission is simply not rebuildable. You do the teardown, follow my inspection guidelines or a factory shop manual, and discover that the wear exceeds any reasonable parts replacement costs...In these cases, we do have an outlet and sensible alternative: Advance Adapters and a new AX15 transmission! Note: Many owners have discovered that a "good used" transmission is an oxymoron for an off-road 4x4 vehicle that gets oversized tires and a lot of shifting either off-pavement or in city traffic. I'm not an advocate of buying "good used" unless you know the history of the donor vehicle. Any 1989-99 Jeep 4x4 transmission has seen more than enough use and is a candidate for my "blueprint rebuild" or a complete replacement. "Good used" can simply translate to "definitely used"! In the day, a BW T-18 or T-98, a GM SM420 or SM465, a New Process NP435 or other commercial grade, iron case "truck" transmissions (or the more contemporary NV4500 or NV5600) were often still in serviceable condition after the vehicle expired. That will not be the case with a used, higher mileage AX15 transmission, it will not provide long or reliable service as a high mileage used purchase. Optimistically, such a "core" might be rebuildable. I have worked closely with Advance Adapters' full line of transmission to transfer case adapters, Atlas transfer cases and other products for decades now. (We can thank Advance Adapters for its support at the magazine and these forums, too!) For many owners, the fatigue and normal wear of a powertrain provides the incentive for unique and popular upgrading of a 4x4 powertrain. In that arena, the Aisin AX15 has become the contemporary transmission of choice for stock 4.0L restorations and even swaps of moderate horsepower V-8 power into a Jeep 4x4 chassis. For horsepower to the 275-300 range (like an LS3 or a 4.6L Jeep inline six stroker) plus a useful overdrive gear, I consider a freshly and properly rebuilt AX15 as a prime candidate for a street/trail "build". These swaps or buildups do require either a rebuilt or new Aisin AX15. This contemporary transmission has also become the replacement for the later, expensive to rebuild 6-speed Jeep TJ Wrangler transmissions. Yes, a brand new AX15 transmission, ready for bolt-in replacement in Jeep and many Dodge Dakota, Toyota and Isuzu applications! These units are close ratio five-speeds (5th overdrive) that can bring new life into a higher mileage vehicle. They also deliver a desirable level of contemporary torque and stamina for moderate horsepower V-8 transplants where an overdrive is desirable. (These units even look great, click on these photos!) The exciting news is that you have the option of buying a new Aisin AX15. These units, available through Advance Adapters (a direct Aisin distributor), provide all of the legendary features and reliability found in new Jeep 4x4s from the Jeep YJ/TJ and XJ Cherokee era (or Dodge Dakota 3.9 V-6 models and other AX15 applications). Advance Adapters has a long reputation for serving the 4WD community, whether sponsoring enthusiast runs at Moab, Utah or supporting the off-road racing community. Advance Adapters maintains this approach with the pricing of these new Aisin AX15 transmissions. So, if your AX15 is either too worn for rebuilding or you're building a contemporary Jeep 4x4 project for the street/trail or off-road use, consider the Advance Adapters AX15 option! For more details, visit the Advance Adapters website at: http://www.AdvanceAdapters.com! Moses
  8. Hi, Just swapped out my AX15 transmission on my 97 Jeep Wrangler. After I completed the job, with the engine off, I was able to shift through the gears without issue. I pressed the clutch pedal and it was easy the first few times then became extremely stiff. I removed the external slave cylinder from the bell housing and manually pushed in the clutch fork with my finger. The fork moved forward easily, then I heard something fall inside the bell housing. I pulled the tranny back off and found the clutch fork retaining clip had fallen off. I proceeded to put it back in place ensuring it was secured. After attaching the tranny back on, I tested the clutch pedal which appeared to operate normally (engine off) as well as ensuring I could shift through the gears without issue. I then continued with attaching the rest of the harnesses, transfer case, etc.. I fired up the engine and heard a knocking sound which appeared to be coming from the external slave cylinder area. As I depressed the clutch, the knocking stopped. I turned off the engine, removed the slave cylinder and had my wife press on the clutch pedal. It became stiff again. I pulled the transmission again and the clutch fork retaining clip was still secured. This is where I have left off for the night. I plan on bleeding the master / slave cylinder system tomorrow and see if that fixes the issue with the stiff clutch pedal. Some questions: 1) How far should I be able to press in the clutch fork manually with the external slave cylinder removed from the bell housing? 2) Should the clutch fork return after being depressed manually (like a spring) with the external slave cylinder removed from the bell housing (mine didn't. After pressing on the clutch fork, it remained in the position I had pushed it to). 2) Should the clutch pedal move freely with the external slave cylinder removed from the bell housing? 3) Could it be the throw-out bearing? It appears to be ok from visual inspection, it slides along the transmission shaft easily, the springs are all intact. Any suggestions would be welcomed. Thanks.
  9. There has been a long thread of exchanges at Timmy960's topic on harsh shifting after rebuilding an AX15 transmission. The problem around 3rd/4th gear shift issues has a basis in the redesign of the synchronizer sleeve, bronze blocking rings and the third gear cog teeth for the sleeve engagement. Jason Logan and I had an exchange about this issue when he rebuilt his '99 TJ Wrangler unit. That exchange was just prior to the launch of the forums. For the benefit of all AX15 rebuilders, I am starting a new topic around this issue, beginning with the in-depth Q&A exchange that Jason Logan and I had...Since this exchange, Jason, Gary, Tim and I have been using the new forums to disseminate AX15 transmission rebuilding details...Here is the original exchange with Jason. I have highlighted important facts: Jason: Hello Moses! I have recently taken advantage of your detailed instruction on how to rebuild an AX15 manual transmission. I am currently working on an AX15 manual transmission from a 1999 jeep tj 4.0L that has never been rebuilt. I have a question regarding the stock 3rd and 4th synchro ring and the corresponding slider [sleeve]! The stock slider has an angle cut on one side and a straight cut on the other side. Also, the stock 3rd gear synchronizer is angle cut and the 4th synchronizer is straight cut. (I may have these backwards). Why is it that the dealer and aftermarket only show that both 3rd and 4th synchronizers are identical (either both are an angle cut or both are a straight cut). I ordered a 3rd and 4th synchronizer from Chrysler and they are identical (straight cut), and when I ordered a set from the aftermarket, the 3rd and 4th were also identical but with an angle cut! Should I use the Chrysler synchronizers (both straight cut), the aftermarket (both angle cut) or should I use one of each to replicate the stock setup as described above? I have put this rebuild on hold for weeks now trying to get some answers from many sources but nothing has been rock solid. I was hoping you could help me and give me some clarification on what is the best set up and why? Why does the slider [sleeve] have different cuts? Why do the replacement synchros have different cuts, different part numbers and configuration of teeth? Thanks for any information you can give me. Jason Logan These photos courtesy of Jason Logan ("JayDLogan"), forum member...Note the 3rd/4th gear sleeve and cog design for his 1999 TJ Wrangler AX15 transmission. Click on each photo to enlarge image. Moses: Jason, I would match synchronizers precisely to the originals and in their original locations. Measure the diameters of the rings, their angles and, most importantly, their fit against the synchronizer hubs in their correct positions. Make sure you face the synchronizer sleeve in the correct direction. Start with the original rings in correct relationship to the synchro hubs and sleeves. Note the overall “width” of the synchronizer assemblies, and then compare this with the aftermarket (new) synchros from both generic and Chrysler sources. The goal is to have synchro rings that will behave and fit just like the originals. Wear on the OEM rings is typically slight, perhaps a few thousandths, so you will know immediately if the parts are either wrong or in the wrong locations. AX15 synchro rings are not the same diameter, and the difference is slight, often confusing the assembly. My article provides details on the kind of “fit” and end plays you should achieve during assembly. Take your time, Jason, you’re already ahead of the game by questioning the parts to make sure of their fit and placement. The OEM layout and fit is your template. Match this and you will “restore” that AX15! Trust this helps…I’ll be at Moab through Thursday and out of communication. Let me know your findings in an Email. I will answer next Friday…Best of luck, I know you will do the right thing here… Moses Jason: Thank you very much for all of your information and help - my dilemma is - when I have ordered the synchro rings from Chrysler (they sent me 2 identical 'straight cut' synchro rings) and when i ordered from the aftermarket (they have sent me 2 identical 'angle cut' rings) but my original synchro rings have 'one of each' cut (one ring is a straight cut and the other ring is an angle cut). Although all synchro rings ordered are the same diameter, angles and fitment as my originals, I'm not sure if I should be using what Chrysler sent me (the 2 straight cut rings) or what the Aftermarket sent me (2 angle cut rings) - or should I be using one of each cut to match identically up to the original set up? I would have thought Chrysler would have sent me one of each (angle and straight cut synchro ring) based on the fact that my original rings are 'one of each' cut. And my second dilemma is - the number of teeth and location of the teeth on each ring ordered are not set up identically to my original configuration of teeth on my original rings - does that matter? I'm extremely grateful for your reply and value your expertise. Jason Logan Jason added these parts details: I found some other information, Moses! If you look at earlier years of the Jeep Wrangler 1997-1998 they have used part number 4897051AA (for both 3 & 4 synchro) or 4897052AA (for both 3&4) depending on the month the jeep was made. Part number 4897051AA is a synchro ring that has teeth that are angle cut and part number 4897052AA has teeth that are straight cut (shaped like a house). The jeep I am working on is a 1999 that calls for part number 4897052AA for both 3 and 4. It looks like at the factory, they have put part number 4897052AA for synchro 4 (near the input shaft) and 4897051AA for synchro 3 (near third gear). Very confusing! I also found, like I noted before in my second email, that the teeth of part number 4897052AA and 4897051AA are in a different configuration around the ring slightly than the originals as you can see in the pictures. I have purchased many 3 and 4 synchro rings but none of the teeth patterns match up! I had no problems matching up 1,2 and 5 synchros. I hope this helps you understand what I am up against! Thanks again! Jason Logan P.S I purchased part number 4897051AA today from Chrysler to clarify if it was angle cut and indeed it was! Moses: Hi, Jason, I’m just back from Moab, UT Jeep Safari…You sent great photos, this is all very interesting! Since the gear/ring in question is really 3rd gear, my belief is that Chrysler/Aisin discovered downshifting to 3rd problems and implemented a remedy. The angle cut would engage the shift sleeve differently, apparently allowing easier engagement on the downshift from 4th to 3rd. It would seem like either ring would work, as they each engage the sleeve troughs accurately (taking a straight-on view). The difference is that the angled ring would engage the sleeve with a different pressure and slight rotation of the ring. Just a guess, but this seems the only identifiable issue. Think about the third gear engagement: Shifting up, there is the lag in the shifter’s neutral gate and a “slower” engagement of 3rd gear. Shifting down, however, would be a direct, quick movement of the shift level and fork. Consequently, the sleeve would want to quickly rush over the brass ring teeth—without providing smooth or effective braking action at the gear hub. This would cause harsher gear engagement. Apparently, the slight angle makes the downshift to 3rd gear smoother, with better braking action and less risk of gear clash. Probably, either design would work if all drivers shifted up and down smoothly and without taxing the synchros. However, American drivers (and others with Jeep vehicles) want to affect a quick downshift to 3rd gear. The concern here, though, is to match the bronze rings with the updated synchronizer sleeve design. Does this make sense, considering the parts layout? The tooth spacing and offset on the rings has more to do with keeping the ring as close to square as it moves onto the gear hub. If nothing else, this is a testimonial to the precision design of Aisin transmissions, more like Euro types than U.S. gear products. The aim with a wedge ramp instead of arrow teeth is the shift “timing”, and that’s a precise consideration. This reflects the rest of the AX15 design quality and fitment. These are more complex units for a reason. I’m sure your build will be stellar, Jason! Let me know how this turns out. Regards, Moses Jason: Makes perfect sense Moses! Would it make sense to you to use the angle cut synchros for both sides of the slider even though the slider on one side is straight cut and the other is angle cut? I am still unsure if I should use both angle cut synchros, both straight cut synchros, or use one of each. The rebuild kit I purchased had two angle cut synchros, I am wondering if this is the upgrade? To me it is like rolling the dice on this decision! Thanks for all your input. Very much appreciated. Regards, Jason Photos courtesy of forum member Jason Logan...Note the OEM synchronizer design for this late version of the AX15—Mopar parts. Moses: I would follow the OEM approach if you’re sure the transmission is original, never before apart (which you believed from the start). The model year is late enough in the game for the synchro "solutions" to be in place…I would match the bronze rings and synchro sleeve carefully to the OEM layout. If this transmission shifted well for all of those miles, I would take this approach! As a final check, place the new synchro rings against the gear hubs to be sure the fit is aligned. You can put a light film of grease on the ring contact surface to read the fit. Wipe the grease away before assembly and coat the ring with a thin film of gear lube. Let me know how this all turns out, Jason… Best, Moses Jason: Thanks again Moses! I hope you had a successful trip to Moab, UT Jeep Safari. I have wanted to go for many years. Wish me luck on the AX15! Regards Jason Moses: Hi, Jason…Moab is breathtaking scenery, with contrast ranging from sandstone/slick rock to alpine peaks capped with snow this time of year, the Colorado River, arches and formations, all of it! I trust you’ll make it at some point, and if so, let me know. I do make the Moab Jeep Safari each year…Like Canada, we live at a “winter zone”, 4400 feet elevation near Reno. We look forward to winter’s end, and Moab Jeep Safari has become our annual end of winter/early spring gathering! You’re going to do a great job on this AX15! Follow the assembly steps faithfully, there are no shortcuts. When completed, you’ll have a smooth-shifting unit, as new, and that will be very gratifying! Let me know the outcome… I launched a message board today with a large number of forums at www.4WDmechanix.com/forums. It would be great to see your involvement if you have the time. Tech forums need detail-oriented members! It’s new, and I’d value your feedback about the forums you find interesting, the sign-up procedure, member validation and use. Best, Moses Note...Jason and I moved this conversation to the new forums at this point...When rebuilding an AX15 that has never been rebuilt before, lay out the parts as you take the unit apart, identify the synchronizer design for 3rd/4th gear, and match parts to the original design. There is a distinct difference between "earlier" AX15 and "late" AX15. The rebuild core in my magazine article and the A150 (Toyota version of the AX15) depicted at the Weber State University YouTube video (click for post topic threads containing the embedded video) are 1990-92 "early" AX15 design. Later model Jeep vehicles with the AX15 use a redesigned 3rd/4th synchronizer assembly...Rebuild accordingly, matching and using the right parts! Jason has added charts from an Aisin direct dealer that show the synchronizer applications for 1998-99 AX15 transmissions. Make sure you check your synchronizer rings and the synchro sleeve design for 3rd/4th gear. Install matching rings for your transmission. Be certain to install the synchro sleeve in the correct direction! ("House" or arrow shaped points match the 4th gear ring with house or arrow point teeth.) Here is an approximate application list with Aisin part numbers (not Jeep/Mopar): Click on image to enlarge...Thanks to Jason Logan for the chart!
  10. In this video discussion, I describe the symptoms of hydraulic clutch linkage leaks in 1987-95 Jeep YJ Wrangler models. Originally part of the Q&A Vlog at the magazine, the viewer's question refers to hard shifting and loss of hydraulic fluid. I share what causes these troubles in this how-to HD video on troubleshooting: Moses
  11. Aisin AX15 manual 5-speed transmissions are popular and found in 1989-99 Jeep vehicles, Dodge Dakota pickups and some GM/Isuzu and Toyota light trucks. Highly detailed, this close up step-by-step instructional HD video rental is available only at vimeo.com/ondemand/ax15rebuild. Included is the information necessary for performing a complete restoration and professional level rebuild of the AX15 transmission. The AX15 transmission rebuilding process involves complex disassembly and assembly sequences. This is a precision gearbox, and every teardown and assembly step is equally important. Knowing which new parts your transmission requires is also valuable. This HD video rental includes two sections. Part 1 is teardown and inspection to establish your needed parts list. Part 2 is the assembly work. Both Part 1 and Part 2 are included in this 94-minute instructional HD video! Whether you have a shop specializing in light truck and 4x4 work or have a one-time 'DIY' project for your personal Jeep, light truck or SUV, this 30-day HD video rental can save you considerable time and money. For the cost of an AX15 shift cover boot, the rental will pay for itself many times over! The magazine's most popular technical articles and how-to videos have been reformatted and painstakingly edited as Vimeo On Demand productions. The latest feature is this in depth instructional how-to covering the rebuild of the popular Aisin AX15 transmission. Access the 94-minute Vimeo On Demand feature at: http://www.vimeo.com/ondemand/ax15rebuild
  12. I have recently installed a rebuilt AX15 in my 98 TJ. From the beginning it has been difficult to shift into 2nd and 4th gears. By difficult I mean it requires some strength to pull to engage as if there is a bungee cord opposing the direction I'm pulling. It will engage each time and does not have any noises associated with these shifts. It occurs only while shifting up into these gears. It shifts into all others fine and down shifts into them fine as well. If I have shifted into one of the gears I can shift back into it with no difficulty if I down/up shift momentarily the shift back. The shop I got it from is blaming it on the fact that I used 75W-90 oil at first. They recommended I switch to 5W-30 synthetic and change the oil a couple times to get the gear oil off the syncros. I have since done so with no effect. The local mopar dealer mechanic thinks it is a bent shift rail or fork. Does anyone have any ideas on this? I want to know if it will break in and get better or if I need to tear it down and inspect the parts for bends?
  13. I have a 95 Wrangler with the 2.5L AX-5 combination. I have the opportunity to replace this combo with the 4.2L AX-15. Other then the engine and transmission swap are there any hidden changes that will have to be made for this swap to work?
  14. I am looking at used jeeps and I will be a first time jeep owner. I am interested in CJs or YJs. I want the jeep mostly for hunting and putt-ing around town. As far as engines go, do you think a 4 cyl would be okay for what I want and not get me in trouble in the mountains, or should I just look at the 6 or an 8 cyl? If a 4 would work, what transmission, axle gearing and tire size would you recommend? I have already found the forums to very informative. Thanks. Rich
  15. Moses, I know your a hardcore 4.0L, especially stroking one, kinda of guy, but I hear far to many folks say that the AX-15 can not handle V8 (300hp, 300 ft lbs +/-) over time...but some say it can. Would like some input from the "Jeep God" himself. Seems other forums are just opinon. Got a lot of dirt track friends with access to cheap SBC's, Ford 302's and such. Thanks again.
  16. I have viewed you webpage on the AX-15 rebuild. It is great! I have one question though. Where can you find the selective snap rings. I have been trying to locate one in particular and I have been told that it is discontinued with no replacement. The part number is 83506088. It is for the 3rd and 4th synchronizer and is 1.90mm. Do you have any idea where to source this part at? Any help would be greatly appreciated. This one ring is holding me up on my assembly. Thanks! BG
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