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Reid

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About Reid

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  1. Yes the Time Sert sounds like the way to go. In fact, I'm thinking of installing them even if I have seemingly good threads in my bell housing. Those bell housing threads are a known weak spot. Excellent info Moses. Reid
  2. Hi William, Yeah they are a bit expensive, but it is easy for me to spend your money! Drilling and tapping the housing may not bring "piece of mind." I based my recommendation on your statement " a permanent solution with no worry of failure if future disassembly is required and better than OEM". I hear you. I like to do things that way myself. It is my understanding that properly installed Helicoils would be stronger and a better "fix" than drilling and tapping aluminum. I do not have any experience installing Helicoils...yet. I am also aware of others experience that even when the transmission to bell housing bolts are properly torqued to 55 ft Lbs the bolts can strip. Plus with a Helicoil you are no longer dealing with aluminum threads. I wonder if installing helicoils and studs in the bell housing would be a good upgrade? I will look forward to learning something when Moses responds. Thanks for sharing your progress. Reid
  3. Got it! Thanks 60Bubba. I'm going to get my bench cleaned off to have adequate space and then I'm going to begin the disassembly. Reid
  4. Thanks Moses and Bubba, Moses it will be excellent to have you take a look at components and help me decide what needs replacement. Also advice on the " esoteric details" often overlooked or assumed in manuals will be extremely valuable. I'm now looking forward to this instead of being afraid to attempt it. Bubba, thanks for your help. I will locate a copy of the Tremc manual, will help to compare to FSM. I'll be in touch when I get started. Reid
  5. Hi Bubba, Thanks for the information. I plan to follow FSM and buy tools as I come to them so to speak. If you don't have the CJ T5 FSM I will be glad to send it to you as PDF. Yeah I knew I needed the cailipers and dial indicator. When I last drove my 85, I had no detectable issues, but since I've got the motor, T case, and T5 out of the Jeep now is a good time to rebuild. I plan to start pretty soon, but am first going to rebuild the T case. Lets keep in touch, let me know about the factory service manual. Reid
  6. Moses, You have been an incredible source of information to me. I recently (several months ago) had my 1985 258 professionally rebuilt. It was balanced, torque plated etc etc. You helped me then. My 1985 CJ7 is completely stock, no changes seem to have been made. Components are all original to this jeep and are OEM. Currently the 258 is on an engine stand and I have removed the trans and T case. The T5 and Dana 300 are now sitting on my bench. I have watched the Dana 300 rebuild here and of course have your Rebuilders Guide. I feel comfortable with the Dana 300 rebuild and intend to do so. FYI: I will be having East Coast Gear change my D30 and AMC 20 from 2.73 to probably 3.73. I have no intention for hard wheeling nor do I want tires larger than 31 inches diameter. My Jeep will be mostly on the highway and occasionally on a Jeep like trail and snow. No hard wheeling of any kind. There are so many places on the web that will rebuild my T5 for around $950, all good, but I want my specific transmission (1352-077) to remain with this vehicle as from the factory. I would also like to build my experience with transmissions. I am willing to buy all necessary tools and parts to rebuild correctly. Arbor press, pullers, bearing installers....it doesn't matter. When finished, I will have an excellent rebuild and all the tools. Henry Ford said: "If you need a tool and don't buy it...you'll eventually pay for it...and not have it". I am a firm believer. I have the T5 FSM. I have attached a huge video file (32 mb) of my input shaft movement. VID_20160520_182156231.mp4 If I send ,lots of pictures etc can you help me rebuild my T5? Reid
  7. Thank you Moses! I learn more than I ask from each of your replies. Its time I got the engine out of the Jeep and over to the builder ASAP. The hood, fenders, and grille are off. I have no excuses now. Thank you again, Reid
  8. Hi Moses, A slight twist on the issue of honing plates for my Jeep 4.2L rebuild has come up. I was told by the engine builder that honing plates are indeed part of the machine work. He volunteered the machine shop uses a 4.0L plate. I guess they don't want to buy two. My presumption is that since 4.0L heads can be installed on 4.2L blocks this may be OK as head bolt stresses would be similar if not the same. Your opinion would be greatly appreciated. Reid
  9. Moses, I so appreciate such a detailed response. It is exactly what I needed. I have found a shop with a reputation of meticulous rebuilds of Jeep and AMC engines and they use a torque plate when boring cylinders. I found another shop with excellent credentials and they don't have a Jeep 258 torque plate and as expected downplay it as an important part of the boring process. The remainder of your list will allow me to know if I am getting a top notch rebuild. The shop with AMC Jeep experiance and the torque plate, are seriously more expensive, but I think it will be money well spent. Thank you for the tip on the video, I will give it a look. Thank you again for taking the time to answer my question so fully. I'll keep you posted on the outcome. Reid
  10. I am having my 1985 4.2 completely rebuilt. It is difficult to know which builder will do a great job due to my inexperience. What are the most important steps in the process of a first class rebuild? Any pertinent questions I should ask? How important is use of a torque plate in the honing process? The build is not a performance rebuild (Weber 38, stock intake and exhaust), but for a rock solid daily driver. Thanks, Reid
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