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I'm looking into getting a bronco ii. I've had a full size and was wondering about the biis. I have heard many great things on forums about them but I have only really heard negative things from people. What do you guys think of them? My main use for one if I got one would be to drive to school, light off-roading and winter driving.

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torinomccourt...Read this Wikipedia historical account of the Bronco II:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Bronco_II.  The vehicle has a high center-of-gravity and narrow track width with a tall body and large amount of glass.  Add to this a Twin Traction Beam radius arm front suspension with its odd caster changes as the frame rises and sets.  I prefer a solid beam front axle or bona fide, equal arm IFS.

At a 94" wheelbase (like the Jeep CJ7, YJ/TJ Wrangler) with a narrow 68" track width, this vehicle's handling is suspect.  A chassis lift kit adds to the problem.  Wider wheels with negative offset can widen the track width, which helps reduce the center-of-gravity issues.  Also, this is a lighter-duty chassis and axles, similar to the Ranger compact pickup, not to be confused with a full-size Bronco or an F150 4x4.

The 1986-up 2.9L EFI V-6 models perform better than the 1983-85 carburetted 2.8L engines.  These two engines are German Ford design, as is the standard 2.3L four, a Capri or Pinto type.  The 2.9L V-6 EFI engine has 25 more horsepower than the 2.8L.

Moses

 

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Just my opinion, yes everyone has one but a stock BII isn't a bad vehicle, raise it up and as stated above things change.

i have seen stock BII's work well off road with posi or lockers and a 4.0 swap t things get tricky when you mod the rig beyon that.

 

Solid axles from a Early Bronco or even full size truck can help or as one I have seen and rode in a BII on Early Bronco Chassis work well too !

If you are seriously thinking BII and off roaming, contact James Duff, they specialize in BII's and Rangers.

Good Luck

 

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Good suggestion, Scrambler82...James Duff has served the vintage Bronco market since 1967.  The business moved to Washington State when I wrote for OFF-ROAD Magazine in the '80s/'90s and now resides at Knoxville, Tennessee.  They cater to vintage 1st generation Broncos, F-truck based Broncos and the Bronco II models.  Check out their catalog and get ideas at:  http://www.jamesduff.com/.

Moses

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I know this is an older post, but, i would like to add this for anyone who comes across it. I had several different BII's, most notably a 1987 with a 2.8 and manual trans, and a 1989 with a 2,9 and manual trans (that a tree crashed onto in a storm, but that is another rant for another day. I still miss that one though), and, with over 150k on the 89, all stock, i could go many places in 2wd, that guys in bigger pickups had to get to in 4WD. They are very capable little vehicles, and, if found in good shape, and decently maintained, will take a fair amount of abuse, as long as it is only occasionally, and not every day. The one downside they all seem to have though, is they rust along the rear part of the floor, no matter what area of the country they are found in (as, years ago, i bought one from Florida, one from Tennessee, and one from Texas, and they all had at least surface rust in that area), just in front of the lift gate, so look there for signs of it.

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We had a carbureted Bronco II 2.8L with five-speed manual and did okay with it...The 4x4 had the rare factory option of limited slips at the front and rear axles, which made traction dicey on off-camber muddy side slopes and icy off-camber highways.  The vehicle had an affinity for spinning all four wheels and sliding to the low side of the road...

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