16 posts in this topic

Hi Moses

heres a pic of the fsj i bought as  donor car for my ute the 6.2l v8 diesel & 727 auto im going to fit into the cj10 also there is a parts car with lots of spares including a 360 v8 & 727 auto the 360 needs a rebuild so ill probably sell that on but ill put a six & the 727 back in this fsj to keep it going after ive put its engine in my ute

it is currently getting 16l per 100 km which is nearly half what the 4.6l in the cj10 uses & it sounds a lot better to

it has new rotors & drums so ill scrounge those to

if it wasnt so rusty around the roof i would keep it but its life is short but i will slow its deterioration down with a bit of body work but its not a restorer unfortunatly

ill post pics as we do the engine transplant

cheers  ian

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Unique, Ian!  I'm curious:  Previous owner installed a G.M. 6.2L naturally aspirated diesel in this FSJ chassis?  727 Chrysler automatic or a G.M. THM400 behind that 6.2L diesel?  Very unusual but functional setup.  Will the 4.6L Jeep stroker six do well with all that FSJ weight?

Moses  

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Hi Moses the conversion was done by a company on our west coast called brunswick diesels back in 05 its has spent a lot of time sitting in a shed as its only got 40,000km on it since the conversion when it was fully reconditioned they made a custom tourque converter for the 727 & it all seems to work very well as they are a very reputable company who these days are mostly fitting duramax's into toyota landcruisers & nissan patrols

i think the 4.6 should be ok for the fsj as a lot of them over here were 4.2 manuals from factory the auto may rob some power but i would imagine it will still be quite usable

 

for now im just enjoying driving it around as it is

cheers  ian

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This is very cool, Ian!  The conversion was well thought out.  Too bad the Jeep's body doesn't lend itself to restoration.  Many FSJs fetch a hefty price in the U.S. these days, especially a well-heeled Grand Wagoneer in exceptional original or fully restored condition.

I've considered building a Grand Wagoneer with Dana 60 axles and a 5.9L 24-valve CRD H.O. Cummins ISB engine and 48RE transmission (OD built on the 727 platform, original equipment for our '05 Ram 3500).  The ISB would actually fit well, as you cite, the engine bay was designed for the longer 4.2L inline Jeep six.

Keep us posted on this.  I'm looking forward to the 6.2L engine conversion photos!

Moses

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Hi Moses

i went & picked up the parts car that came with 'Harry '( thats what the fsj is affectionately known as) its a shame its body is even worse because its a limited & has all the fruit & i love the colours looks good in the pics but the rear end is rotten

i will be putting the leather seats in thow & should be able to get enough patch panels from the roof & gutter sections to restore harry 

ive become quite attached to this car already i dont often get this kind of attachment i mean ive got a 70 dodge challenger ive restored with 600hp+ & i have little interest in it but ill drive this old jeep every day every where i go just something about it

how weird is that i buy it for a donor car & fall in love with it looks like the cj10 will be keeping its 6 cylinder petrol for a while

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Fully understand the attachment, Ian...My wife still prefers our 1987 Jeep FSJ Grand Wagoneer to all other Jeep models we've owned.  Unfortunately, we sold the 'Grand...

The wheelbase on the FSJ Cherokee and Wagoneer/Grand Wagoneer hits the mark.  These vehicles have a wide track width for safe and predictable handling plus a unique, short enough wheelbase for maneuverability.  Beam axles with track and sway bars...Ride quality was equal to or better than any other 4x4 SUV built at the time...World Class!  That's the attraction...

Moses

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took harry out for a fishing & camping weekend with the local angling club i belong to we actually caught fish this time it was a good weekend all the gear in the back & off we went it sounds awesome thundering through the tracks big lazy thumping v8 

i believe you are right about the ride being world class i would even go as far as to say world leading when they first went into production as the range rover didnt get produced until these beasts had been in production for 5 years or so & nothing else would come close till the nineties

cheers  ian

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What a great time, Ian, just the right 4x4 for the job, too!  I just posted our trip to Bodega Bay, California at the magazine.  (See at the Home Page video slider right now:  www.4WDmechanix.com.) We could superimpose our two ocean backdrops!

These Jeep FSJs have become cult vehicles over time, people realizing the far-reaching design of the chassis, body and powertrain...I recall the earliest Kaiser Era J-trucks and Wagoneers rolling off transport trailers at C.O.D. Garage (Jeep, Chevrolet and Buick dealership at Minden, Nevada) while I was in high school.  With the introduction of the AMC/Rambler engines (I-six and V-8), and later the Buick V-8s, the 'sixties Gladiator and Wagoneer became a sensation at Carson Valley.  Ranchers, townsfolk and recreationalists thought the Wagoneer and especially the "Super Wagoneer" were the most versatile and elegantly optioned 4WD SUVs around.  Fortunately, AMC/Jeep continued the tradition from 1972 onward with its own engines.

I'm all about fishing, glad you are, too...Healthy pursuit and great food!

Moses

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Hi Moses

ive been adding a few things to Harry it now has a roof rack ,2 awnings ,a 42" light bar ,9" led spotties ,a winch ,10 disc stacker & an arial & craddle for the mobile phone for better reception up next will be the dual battery system & fit out the back

its done the pinion seal in the rear diff theres a little bit of play in the bearing so i think that best be my next priority

cheers  ian

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Harry's doing what he does best, Ian!  

Pinion seal can be replaced without fanfare if this is the original Dana 44.  Re-torquing the flange nut may take up the pinion bearing play at the factory torque setting (210 ft-lbs or 271 N.m).  This should be a shimmed pinion bearing design without a crush sleeve...Use a new, self-locking pinion nut...After tightening the yoke/flange pinion nut, there should be no perceptible endplay at the pinion shaft...Otherwise, it's take apart time, you know the drill!

Moses 

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Hi Moses

its an amc 20 in the rear i havent checked wheather these are a crush sleeve or can be retourqued to take up the bearing play but im sure ill find out

cheers  ian

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Ian...Ah, the J-truck/CJ Model 20 AMC axle approach for your model...There is a "collapsible spacer" (crush sleeve).  Pinion depth is set with shims.  A new crush sleeve/collapsible spacer is always recommended when re-torquing the pinion nut.  

A caution:  Do not over-tighten and crush the new sleeve too much, you cannot back the pinion nut off if it is over-tightened, another new crush sleeve is required.  A crush sleeve must always place high spacer tension against the backside of the bearings.  Use of a new pinion nut is always wise, I also use Loctite 271 Red on the nut's threads for insurance.

The nut is carefully tightened to the correct pinion shaft bearing preload of 17-25 in-lbs rotational torque with a resistant (new) collapsible spacer.  To get an accurate rotational torque reading, I do the pinion preload with the ring gear and carrier removed from the axle.  This requires sliding the axle shafts outward and removal of the bearing caps.  Do not misplace or lose track of the differential carrier bearing shims and their locations when removing the ring gear carrier assembly.  If you keep the shims sorted out, you can readily restore carrier bearing preload and the ring gear backlash.

Have fun!

Moses

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Hi moses

ive got it sorted out there was another problem when i opened it up the pin through the carrier was coming out & started hitting the back of the pinion so i welded a washer over each end so it cant come out again this saved me from having to open the locker which was proving to be impossible with the tools i have also i replace all bearings which meant the original shims were incorrect fortunately the kit i bought has shims so i was able to set it up it is now quieter than it was at speed but still make a little noise at low speed

the kit i used was the motive gear kit from summit racing it came with crown wheel bolts too but theyre not needed

cheers  ian

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You're resourceful, Ian, but that's no surprise!  Actually, the new bearings, if you reuse the original shim stack heights and placements, generally do not alter the settings.  That's a prime reason to keep track of shim locations and their thicknesses...at least a place to start.

Bearings of the same part numbers, if from quality sources, are most often a dead ringer size-wise.  If the axle was set up properly in the first place, the unworn (new) bearings will restore clearances or the preload, often making the job easier with less fuss around shim stacks and tests.

Proof of fit on these axles is always the ring-and-pinion tooth contact pattern.  If your bearing preloads and tooth pattern are good, you're golden!  

Not disturbing the pinion depth or pinion bearing preload can speed the process along.  Matching the original pinion shim thickness and shim locations will often make this much easier, especially if the axle has never been rebuilt.  The original build on the axle is generally set up properly.

Cheers at the Holidays, Ian!

Moses

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Using a new pinion nut is always wise

-that's a fact and a better solution than using the old one. I like what you did to your vehicle. you're very resourceful indeed. Anyway, may I know what LED light bar you put on your ride?

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Hi 4x4 Freakie

thanks for the compliment the light bar i have is a 42" illuminator they are available through an aussie supplier called 4wdsupercentre.com.au they have heaps of gear at great prices but im not sure if they ship international

cheers  ian

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