Jump to content


Garage Vehicles

Disney Pics 003.jpg

Jeep Wrangler (1992)

Owner: Megatron

Added: 27 September 2013 - 08:56 AM

20131023_113518.jpg

Dodge Ram 3500 (2006)

Owner: Megatron

Added: 25 September 2013 - 07:37 AM

6-inch XJ suspension lift (Lead).jpg

Jeep XJ Cherokee 4WD Sport 4-door (1999)

Owner: Moses Ludel

Added: 15 September 2013 - 01:16 PM


Photo
- - - - -

Kawasaki KLR 650 Engine Rebuild


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 10 March 2014 - 03:55 AM

To begin I had a few measurements to make to make sure the components from this engine were in spec.  I made these before installing the parts but chose to take pictures while the parts were in the case.

 

The shift forks (3) and their shafts.

Attached File  IMG_1238.jpg   68.63KB   0 downloads

 

The respective grooves the forks fit into, this one is on the input shaft.

Attached File  IMG_1240.jpg   123.8KB   0 downloads

 

The amount of space between the crank half and connecting rod.

Attached File  IMG_1241.jpg   122.44KB   0 downloads

 

There is also a measurement to make of the amount of radial play which I could not make with the limited amount of tools I had to measure with... I chose to inspect by feel ( I know that is laughable because feeling a distance of a couple of thousandths of an inch is next to impossible) It felt good to me so I moved on.

 

The two case halves. 

Attached File  06 rebuild_001.jpg   154.05KB   0 downloads

 

The transmission input (left) and output shafts.

Attached File  06 rebuild_002.jpg   122.84KB   0 downloads

 

The KLR transmission in place in the right crankcase half showing the input and output shaft with shift forks and shift drum.

Attached File  06 rebuild_003.jpg   156.41KB   0 downloads

 

The right side crankcase ready to be sealed up showing the oil pick up, front balancer shaft, upper rear balancer shaft and weight, crankshaft and piston.

Attached File  06 rebuild_004.jpg   165.28KB   0 downloads

 

One more photo of the assembly before closing it up.  There are not too many complicated things going on here but it does take quite a bit of work to get this far.

Attached File  IMG_1242.jpg   148.49KB   0 downloads



#2 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 March 2014 - 08:26 AM

Forman, your photos are always tops!  We'll have to talk about digital editing, I have some interesting and subtle things to share that work for me.  Maybe there's room for a "photography forum" where everyone can share photography details?

 

You're doing a very thorough job here and sharing some major concerns with other motorcycle engine builders.  The Kawasaki will be a highly reliable cycle when you finish!  This is exciting.

 

Thanks for taking the time to offer these details, tech steps and such great photographs...

 

Moses



#3 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 11 March 2014 - 03:32 AM

I like to use photos to communicate, for me it is so much easier to ask a question in reference to a photo.  I'd be interested to hear your editing techniques, I've shied away from digital editing, I think it is because I still enjoy film photography.  I seem to tell myself often "you should have taken a better exposure there were 8 different ones to choose and you picked that one"  While shooting nature photography I'll carry both digital and film cameras.  Often the digital photo count will out number the film 10 to 1.  The process of taking a photo with film has made me a better photographer, it slows me down and makes me think about composition, exposure, and color saturation.

 

I found a dead Rio Grande Turkey a few weeks back, my wife says that I will take a picture of anything...

 

Attached File  IMG_0744.jpg   166.57KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  IMG_0753.jpg   240.17KB   0 downloads

 



#4 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 11 March 2014 - 04:18 AM

The rebuild continues by enclosing the crankcase with the left side crankcase half, leaving the front balancer shaft, the crankshaft, and the upper balancer shaft exposed, and further toward the back of the engine the output shaft.

 

The three shafts that are "timed" have small indicator marks that will line up with another indicator mark on the balancer weight or sprocket.

 

The front balancer shaft and weight

Attached File  IMG_0027.jpg   116.77KB   0 downloads

 

The upper balancer shaft and timing chain sprocket, the weight is inside the crankcase.

Attached File  IMG_0029.jpg   92.87KB   0 downloads

 

The crankshaft has 2 marks the bottom one is used with the piston at top dead center.

Attached File  IMG_0037.jpg   134.1KB   0 downloads

 

The balancer chain has 3 sets of sliver links that are used to time the trio I mentioned above.

Attached File  IMG_0032.jpg   114.69KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  IMG_0037.jpg   134.1KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  IMG_0035.jpg   173.05KB   0 downloads

 

The chain guides are next

Attached File  IMG_0041.jpg   176.52KB   0 downloads

 

The chain tensioner sprocket assembly and I've added the cam chain

Attached File  IMG_0042.jpg   196.25KB   0 downloads

 

Then the "doohickey" this one is an aftermarket part.

Attached File  IMG_0044.jpg   139.22KB   0 downloads

 

The starter gears

Attached File  IMG_0043.jpg   186.41KB   0 downloads

 

The stator cover

Attached File  IMG_0045.jpg   145.71KB   0 downloads



#5 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 11 March 2014 - 12:31 PM

Thanks, again, Forman, for your photo contributions, including these latest KLR details!  You also turned a dead turkey into valid art...Very nice work!

 

I've been a "professional" photographer since the 1970s, with over 16,000 published photos in magazines (illustrations, spreads and covers), newspapers plus my seven tech books.  I began with film and stubbornly did not "give it up" until 2003-2004, when publishers simply refused to handle (or couldn't scan) B&W negatives and color transparencies.  This was the line in the sand and my turn toward digital photography, which I now "embrace" wholly, though I keep my Mamiya Sekor 645 camera available for fine art/photography (making digital scans from film).  My trusty 35mm Nikon FE2 bodies were unceremoniously retired in 2004.

 

Having a film background is a great teacher.  There is no latitude for exposure error, and each shot must count (or you will, quite literally, pay for it!).  Film teaches texture, color grading, exposure values and every other principle of photography without "avoiding" the process with microprocessors and sensors.  My first professional camera was a Mamiya-Sekor C330 twin reflex, and I shot everything from wildlife to motocross racing with it.  This required patience and setting up for each photo—unnecessary with high-speed frame digital cameras. 

 

My latest D7100 Nikon (sought for HD video capability) is a DSLR capable of 7-frames per second sharp photo shooting plus time lapse refinements.  It shoots terrific HD video at 1080P, the main reason I acquired the system.  I can also use my 30 years of Nikkor lenses with this body plus the two new VR lenses (my first) that came with the package.

 

My concern is that folks have become lax about focus and depth of field with the "auto-focus" and "auto-exposure" features in new cameras.  I never used an auto-focus lens prior to 2003, zoom, focus and exposure were all manual.  Fortunately, I haven't lost those manual skills, though I'm rusty from disuse.  My wakeup call is that true HD video and cinema filming at the professional level is done with manual focus and manual use of exposure...So, I'm heading down that road again!

 

As for your digital photography, I do have a suggestion for photo editing.  Since my later cameras are Nikon (other than the 645 Mayima without digital backer capability), Nikon's Capture NX2 software came to my attention with the purchase of a Nikon D100 and subsequent D300 camera.  I began using NX2 for basic exposure improvements and have since discovered its exceptional versatility for improving nearly any digital image...This is a luxury for a traditional film photographer, I must admit!  I recall hundreds of Fujichrome 100 professional shoot images that went into the trash can due to .5-1.0 F-stop exposure error...

 

If you're curious what two minutes of NX2 can do for an image, I can snag a couple of your .jpg images from the KLR photos and play with them for comparison...

 

Moses



#6 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 11 March 2014 - 01:40 PM

I'm curious about NX2 I've never heard of it. Feel free to use some of my images. The only Nikon I own is an FE2 my mom gave me in the early 80's I only shoot a couple of rolls through it a year now, but back in the day I used it constantly.



#7 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 12 March 2014 - 06:58 AM

Ah, one more thing we share:  an appreciation for the Nikon FE2!  This bulletproof 35mm film camera served my professional career from the early '80s through 2004.  The photos that went through these bodies were innumerable!  I had two over time, the first one purchased used from Nelson's Photo at San Diego, the unit was barely used by a San Diego Union newspaper staffer and traded-in with a batch of cameras to Nelson's Photo.  Wonderful cameras...

 

I'll grab a couple of your KLR .jpg photos and fiddle with them in Nikon Capture NX2...For digital Nikon or even other makes of cameras, the NX2 program works far better than Photoshop in many ways—and is much more user friendly!  Adobe has a knack for creating "career" learning curves around its software.  NX2 has features that outstrip Photoshop, especially the ability to make changes without the cumbersome "layers" approach. 

 

Stay tuned!

 

Moses



#8 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:58 PM

Forman, I spent two to three minutes apiece fiddling with your KLR images.  "Editing" is always subjective, and you might approach the edits differently than I did, that's understood.

 

Compare the images ("before" from above and "after" below), and you will see how much latitude exists in an image that has captured high and low exposure highlights, whether or not the lows are visible in the original image.  Obviously, there was "hidden imagery" in your two photos, or there would be no chance of raising the exposure value and keying up the dark areas.

 

Here are the two pics from above after basic treatment in Capture NX2:

 

Attached File  Forman Edit 1.jpg   420.85KB   0 downloads Attached File  Forman Edit 2.jpg   343.07KB   0 downloads

 

Note that these file sizes increased more than three-fold with the edit.  They then were compressed down to the "web" size seen above.  (Each looked very  sharp at over 5000 pixel width, reduced here to 800 pixels width maximum when fully opened.)  The primary function that I used is the unique "U-Point" technology.

 

Moses



#9 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 13 March 2014 - 03:04 AM

Very nice Moses I'll have to explore digital editing soon.  Right now I'm trying to get the postal service to deliver my cylinder to the correct person in El Cajon to be overbored.  It was in San Diego once but now is in Memphis.  I'll think that I'll never see it again.



#10 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 13 March 2014 - 08:27 PM

Oh, boy, Postal Service issues...They usually get this right eventually, at least there's a tracking number these days and bar code...Can understand why you sent USPO, the rate would be less for a package the size of an empty motorcycle barrel.  UPS and FedEx are spendy these days.  OnTrac has surprised me with its prompt service—but to limited zones of service.

 

Moses



#11 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 02 April 2014 - 09:47 AM

The package did arrive but to late to ship an in stock piston back with the honed cylinder.  I'm waiting on a back ordered piston then machine work on the cylinder, dang it!  While I'm waiting, Moses and if you have time, would you walk me through the process of hand honing my other cylinder?  I plan on rebuilding that engine later this year and will have to freshen up the top end.

 

We can start off by talking about the tools needed.



#12 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 02 April 2014 - 10:10 AM

Hi, Forman...I will start two new topics, one at the "General Repairs and Technical Tips", the other at the "The Right Tools and Equipment" forum.  Expect details at each, including a comparison of hone types and the actual honing process for your motorcycle cylinder...I'll see if there's a cylinder around, this would be a nice HD video how-to!

 

Watch for the two new topic posts...I'll get to them shortly, starting up the XR650R this morning after the upper engine rebuild and how-to video filming...Yeah!

 

Moses



#13 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 03 April 2014 - 03:48 AM

I know that you are excited about getting your bike running again, good luck to you! Thanks for the new topics.

 

Spring has sprung here and the annual songbird migrations to summer breeding territories has commenced so we are busy evaluating populations of threatened and endangered species that frequent our area.  For me it is a great time to lug the heavy telephoto lens around and try to get some close up shots.

 

This Eastern Screech-Owl let me get very close before flying, I've not had that happen very often.

 

Attached File  Eastern Screech Owl_1.jpg   138.67KB   0 downloads

 

This is a Golden-cheeked Warbler an endangered songbird about the size of your thumb, at least in our area their numbers are increasing.

 

Attached File  Golden - cheeked warbler_1.jpg   100.64KB   0 downloads 

 

 



#14 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 03 April 2014 - 08:24 AM

Fantastic photos, Forman, absolutely suitable for framing!...This is what access to Nature is all about, and you captured it...Thanks for sharing...Feels like Spring!

 

Moses



#15 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 10 April 2014 - 04:26 AM

I'm getting anxious about not having a motorcycle to ride... I'm still waiting on parts.  I pulled my other piston and cylinder ( I have two engines that are in similar disrepair) made some measurements and concluded that both piston and cylinder are probably capable of being hand honed however, the results might just be marginal and not long lasting.  I did find a machinist that is fairly close and willing to use his expertise to help me make a better decision.  We are probably looking at another overbore and new piston.  Moses I loved your video about the work that LA Sleeve does and I know that you purchased some parts from them for your XR 650.  It seems that around here everyone wants to use forged pistons and you prefer cast pistons.  What was the reason for your decision to use cast over forged?



#16 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 10 April 2014 - 07:27 AM

Thanks for the comments about the L.A. Sleeve work and video.  The upper engine assembly video will be available shortly.

 

Forged pistons are generally higher compression ratio.  The material is intended for severe duty pounding, typically in a racing environment.  The expansion rate for forged alloy pistons is such that the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance must be wider, and these pistons can be noisy at cold start and require warming up the engine to quiet the pistons down.  Newer design forged pistons, in some applications, are less noisy.

 

Cost for forged pistons can be high.  Cast pistons are generally OEM replacement.  On automotive applications, I most often use Silv-O-Lite (United Engine) hypereutectic pistons, which are technically "cast" but offer much better service and longevity.  This is a good choice when forged pistons are overkill for the application, compression ratio and intended vehicle use.

 

For the Honda XR650R, I consulted with L.A. Sleeve about the quality of the L.A. Piston Company replacement piston.  It is essentially an OE replacement piston, LAPC's "Pro-Cast" design, built to close tolerances to last at least as long as the OE piston, which holds up quite well with normal use.  Add to this the precision machine shop honing and a quality ring set, also provided by L.A. Sleeve, and I am certain the setup will last a very long time.  If I thought a forged piston would last longer in my intended use of the motorcycle, I would have opted for a forged Wiseco or similar quality piston and matched rings.

 

One concern that pops up in any case is engine operating temperature.  A forged piston could tolerate extreme heat, and since I did stick with the OE equivalent cast piston, my focus will be improving the engine's cooling ability.  Before getting overly concerned about the piston material, I am reminded that my earlier air-cooled Honda XRs (an XR350R and the XR500R) each use a cast piston and have survived Nevada desert riding year 'round for decades.  The Honda XR650R motorcycle engine has 10:1 compression (stock) and liquid cooling.  It will hold up very nicely with a cast piston.

 

Moses



#17 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 24 April 2014 - 05:04 AM

I'm getting ready to finish this project when I noticed the wear pattern on my clutch drum I was wondering if these wear patches could be filed down?

 

Attached File  clutch_001.jpg   85.93KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  clutch_002.jpg   81.59KB   0 downloads

 

 



#18 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 24 April 2014 - 10:07 AM

Hi, Forman!  This wear pattern may not be excessive.  There may be a side-play measurement in your shop manual for judging how much the plates can move in these slots.  The notches, as long as they are within the play range, should not cause an issue.  With a wet clutch, you have little concern for noise or clicking of plates from play. 

 

Filing flat would not improve the function of the clutch, the plates would still shuffle around the same amount.  As long as the plate tabs do not hang on the notch areas and remain within the notches' wear borders, there's not much of a problem here. 

 

On the other hand, if there is this degree of wear at the inside splines on the clutch hub, you have a problem.  The inner hub takes the brunt of the torque load both on and off the throttle.  Since the inner hub looks "acceptable", there's less likelihood of trouble here.  I'd pass on the filing idea.  As long as the clutch friction stack stays within the notch borders of the basket, and does not ramp up at the notch edges, you should be fine.

 

As for filing, this stamped basket material should be quite hard, possibly through-hardened.  (Look for signs of factory heat treating on the basket.)  Filing could be not only a chore, but if you heat up the metal surface with a grinding disc, the heat treatment will be lost.  This would make the metal soft and prone to rapid wear.

 

Moses



#19 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 25 April 2014 - 01:32 PM

I have started putting the engines right side together and here are a few photos...

 

Right side front balancer, the primary and oil pump drive gears and the shift drum installed.

 

Attached File  right side_001.JPG   165.54KB   0 downloads

 

 

The gear shift lever and everything torqued.

 

Attached File  right side_004.JPG   159.88KB   0 downloads

 

The clutch basket

 

Attached File  right side_002.JPG   161.52KB   0 downloads

 

The clutch drum then the plates and cover and springs I thought I had a photo but did not.

 

Attached File  right side_003.JPG   149.77KB   0 downloads

 

I installed the oil pump but forgot to take a picture before I closed up with the right side cover then I installed the water pump impeller.  I'm still waiting on the cylinder and piston.

 

Attached File  right side_005.JPG   145.33KB   0 downloads



#20 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 25 April 2014 - 10:55 PM

Exciting, Forman!  I know this build will be a rewarding experience.  We're each itching to "ride", the weather is coming around (although it snowed in the Sierra Range today, typical later spring weather).  I fired the Honda XR650R yesterday and did some minor tune work and jetting adjustments at the shop today...Oh, boy! 

 

Using a Lucas zinc additive for engine break-in, running the non-silicate Honda 50/50 premix coolant/antifreeze.  I decided to check the previous owner's "uncorking" measures within the carburetor and wound up cleaning metal pieces in Berryman carb cleaner.  (Used the California formula to make sure that I'll live long enough to enjoy the Big Red Pig!)  Ready to ride the BRP, so it's time for a dealership inspection and trip to the DMV. 

 

I'm estimating 55 horsepower (at the crankshaft) and 50-52 ft-lbs of torque.  The exhaust note and throttle response with the Honda "Power-up Kit" is impressive.  I did install the Hot Cams Stage 1 camshaft.  Very pleased with the stable, smooth idle and ready transitions through each throttle circuit. 

 

A tip if you're running the engine unloaded (stationary) for tuning:  Use a larger household or shop caged blade fan in front of the bike!  This dropped engine and radiator temps 30-degrees and kept a lid on the coolant temp during the tuning today.  New engine, don't want an overheat...The BRP does not use a factory fan.  Future add-on?

 

We'll continue comparing notes, Forman...Plan on a two-wheeled summer!

 

Moses



#21 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 26 April 2014 - 07:39 PM

I purchased an over sized piston from Pro x and had my cylinder bored to accept the new piston.  I went online to see what the ring gap specs would be when I saw that the maximum amount of hours was noted as 20 hours?  Really only 20 hours what did I buy?  I've included a link to the instruction page, I'm referring to page one last sentence in the box.

 

http://www.pro-x.com...nstructions.pdf



#22 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 27 April 2014 - 07:19 AM

Forman...I read the Pro-X instructions and recommended lifespan of rings.  Before you panic, I'm guessing that Pro X is referring to dirt bikes that race, and in particular, two-strokes and four-strokes.  A neighbor's son raced motocross, and the father is a motorcycle mechanics school graduate.  Dad serviced the cycle and boasted that the Honda CRF250 race bike would go 40-plus hours between piston ring set changes.

 

The only concern you have here is whether the Pro-X rings are OEM quality or better.  Your KLR rings should last 15-20,000 miles, perhaps even longer on a quality synthetic oil.  Even this may sound minimal, however, motorcycle engines do spin faster. 

 

When considering piston ring lifespan and wear, we're talking about the amount of piston travel.  Imagine a dirt race bike on a motocross track, constantly running in the "right" gear for peak torque and horsepower, likely running the engine continuously at 6000-11000 rpm.  Think of 20 hours run time in these terms, and if you do the math, that's like tens of thousands of highway miles at the cruise rpm on a KLR!

 

If you do have a concern, call the tech line at Pro-X and ask whether the rings you have here are OEM equivalent or better in both materials and design.  If so, you should be fine.  Break in the 650 on a quality conventional motor oil with some Lucas zinc break-in additive in the correct proportion for the crankcase capacity.  (I did this on the XR650R engine to protect the camshaft during break-in.)  Once broken-in, with the rings seated, switch to a quality synthetic oil recommended for motorcycle engines.

 

Moses



#23 forman

forman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts

Posted 27 July 2014 - 04:05 PM

My vendor problems persisted through out the spring and early summer. In my frustration I put the project aside for a couple of months and stopped thinking about it for awhile.

I chose to proceed with the Pro X piston in lieu of the fact that I could not communicate with the company and have them answer my questions about the ring expected life.

I watched Moses' repair to his engine and used all of his tips along the way. Really building the top end of one of these type of bikes can be done without a lot of experience my skills can attest to that. The piston kit instructions outlined the procedure and gave specifics as to ring gap and alignment around the piston. The cylinder slipped over the piston and rings, and was bolted and torqued to the engine case then the head was secured and torqued also.

Then I added oil and checked the valve clearance and buttoned up the valve cover, coolant hoses were replaced and installed and coolant added. Air box and filter inspected, the carburetor and fuel system cleaned inspected and installed. A new spark plug and ignition wires installed. Next the starter and exhaust system were replaced. The balance of parts like the counter sprocket and chain foot pegs and seat were installed. A fan placed in front of the radiator to help move air through the coils. A deep breath and a touch of the starter button brought the new engine to life.

 

I've seen how bad things inside an engine can be worn and the engine still run so I don't know why I get so excited when after I've painstakingly rebuilt an engine and started it up for the first time why I'm amazed that it starts so easily... It is doing what I want it to do right?
I followed Moses break in procedure. Really it took some restraint on my part to not be tempted to do it my way or take a short cut, but I'm certain that his experience is on my side and will ensure long engine life. I changed my break in oil at seventy five miles and replaced with conventional oil and am happy to report that after 500 miles the engine has not used oil, runs strong with a quick throttle response and gets over 50 miles to the gallon. I smile every time I get on it!



#24 Moses Ludel

Moses Ludel

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,021 posts
  • LocationReno Area...Nevada
Garage View Garage

Posted 27 July 2014 - 09:21 PM

Yeah, Forman!!!  Knew you could do it, knew you'd be thrilled with the results.  The XR650R Honda is a beast, and 40 mpg will likely be the best mileage after break-in from what other owners share.  You're doing what the KLR is famous for: 50-plus mpg.  There's a big replacement fuel tank in my future, the stock 2.6 gallons won't cut it at rural Nevada!  It would be great if we were less miles apart and able to share some miles!

 

I changed the oil filter at 75 miles, just precautionary but comforted that I did.  The oil is still spotless, a sign of correct jetting and no oil burning or blowby from the first start-up. Tune and jetting are very important, the Honda is dialed properly and wants to do nothing but start readily and run strongly and smoothly across the entire rpm band!

 

I, too, am having difficulty keeping the lid on it.  I did a test of Michelin T63 tires that will be at the magazine shortly.  In demonstrating the tires' performance on- and off-pavement, I found the engine anxious to pull through the gears at what I would estimate was 5,000-5,500 RPM (no tach) per gear.  No redline stuff.  The torque is so strong that one challenge is preventing rear wheel spin off-pavement.  I'm sure the Baja racers discovered this early on, you can steer this bike readily with the throttle!  The video footage is quite impressive, it actually looks sped up, and believe me, it isn't!  Like I shared, this thing is a beast...

 

In the process of fulfilling the original goal of toting video gear into the backcountry, I turned to TCI Products (saddle and tail racks) and Nelson-Rigg (bags).  The workmanship and design of each product line are very impressive, I filmed the installation and set-up of the racks and bags, will add this to the magazine HD video coverage shortly.  Incredible equipment if you need to tote gear for your trips.  I also tossed the factory plastic skid plate in favor of a precision fit TCI Products aluminum skid plate with sturdy engine side case guards.  That's another installation HD video pending!

 

I really thought all this add-on weight for racks, gear, bags and the skid plate would affect performance.  Without gear, just the skid plate, racks and bags, I would say the weight increase is around 35-40 pounds.  This still has the bike under 340 pounds wet.  Add video and camping gear for another 40-50 pounds, and I should be under 400 pounds (plus rider weight).  This would be more like 380-390 pounds wet, maybe as much as 395 pounds.

 

Note: Advertised dry weight of the Honda XR650R was 277 pounds in enduro off-road factory trim.  With a Baja Designs dual-sport conversion kit, lubricants and fuel, the cycle set around 300 pounds before adding the TCI Products skid plate, racks and bags.

 

Add my weight for another 188 pounds in riding apparel.  (I'm working on this live weight, would like to be around 180 pounds soaked with all riding apparel.)  I'll likely put this whole package, including me, the bags and gear, plus a full tank of fuel, on an accurate scale and determine the "real" wet weight for over-the-road.

 

The moral of the story is that the added weight has minimal impact on this cycle's stellar acceleration, braking and overall performance.  As for handling, I do compensate for the cargo, but even that's minimized by the saddle bags, as they ride lower and have less effect on the center-of-gravity. 

 

I am a happy camper, and like you're discovering, Forman, the work applied is more than worth it...I look forward to any and every opportunity to ride this bike!

 

Again, congratulations on a job well done!  I could see your attention to detail and workmanship in the photos you shared with fellow forum members.  I would not hesitate to have you join me on a "100 miles from nowhere" ride, traveling where reliability is crucial to getting home. 

 

Ride safely and enjoy every mile with that KLR dual-sport moto, Forman!  It's a great machine for your climate and terrain!  As the miles and interesting trips unfold, we'll strike up new post topics at the forum travel and dual-sport adventure sections!  Keep sharing your tech projects, too...

 

Moses

 

P.S.:  I'll change to either full synthetic or Chevron 'Isosyn' Supreme motor oil soon.  I believe the key to engine and piston ring life on these higher revving motorcycle engines is in the motor oil.  A friend at Warn Industries has a Honda XR650R.  He said switching to Amsoil synthetic made his right leg significantly cooler!  If exhaust temp dropped this noticeably, this means the engine friction and wear dropped as well.  I'd like to run some exhaust temp tests to validate this phenomenon, before and after running synthetic oil.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users