JohnF

Details on Rebuilding the Spicer Model 18 Jeep Transfer Case

37 posts in this topic

Next I installed the poppet balls and springs in the front bearing cap. Before I installed these the shafts moved easily. After, I couldn't budge them, I hope that is correct since they are designed to keep the shafts from moving around freely. The order the go is ball, spring, cap.

 

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Rear cap seal installed

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Locking plate for main shaft 

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I hated to cover up all this nice work  :)  gasket shellac then oil pan gasket then more shellac

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I couldn't find what to torque the oil pan bolts so I torqued to 25 lbs

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This is art to me  :) I'm a bit weird I guess but I love turning rusty greasy things new again.

 

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This is how far I got. More to follow

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I painted the driveshaft yoke and put on the felt seal

 

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Used an impact gun to install washer and nut

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A little reminder to me to torque the nut after the case is mounted and I can get some leverage

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It's the little details that go a long way for me

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Assume you coated the output shaft splines with a thin film of gasket "shellac" as noted in my book?  This keeps gear lube from wicking out the splines and yokes. 

 

Copper coat on the shim stack works nicely...When coating gaskets, wipe up any drips and excesses.  This is a gear drive unit without a large risk of blocking passageways with sealant, but on engines or modern chain drive transfer cases, you don't want excess sealant floating around in the unit and clogging an oil pickup screen.  There's a balance between adequately coating the gaskets, which is obviously a must, and excess...There's also the cost of the gasket sealant...Are you using Permatex Super 300D or equivalent?

 

25 lb-ft torque on these 5/16" stud pan bolts is plenty, 18-20 lb-ft would be about right.  Leave them alone now. 

 

The older cork pan gasket wouldn't tolerate more than 15 lb-ft or so before splitting, you have an advantage with the cut composition gasket.  I would re-torque/check the bolts at 20 lb-ft after a short in-service interval, these gaskets generally change shape slightly, and the bolts often require re-torque. 

 

Moses  

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Assume you coated the output shaft splines with a thin film of gasket "shellac" as noted in my book?  This keeps gear lube from wicking out the splines and yokes. 

 

Copper coat on the shim stack works nicely...When coating gaskets, wipe up any drips and excesses.  This is a gear drive unit without a large risk of blocking passageways with sealant, but on engines or modern chain drive transfer cases, you don't want excess sealant floating around in the unit and clogging an oil pickup screen.  There's a balance between adequately coating the gaskets, which is obviously a must, and excess...There's also the cost of the gasket sealant...Are you using Permatex Super 300D or equivalent?

 

25 lb-ft torque on these 5/16" stud pan bolts is plenty, 18-20 lb-ft would be about right.  Leave them alone now. 

 

The older cork pan gasket wouldn't tolerate more than 15 lb-ft or so before splitting, you have an advantage with the cut composition gasket.  I would re-torque/check the bolts at 20 lb-ft after a short in-service interval, these gaskets generally change shape slightly, and the bolts often require re-torque. 

 

Moses  

Yes, I coated splines on inside of yoke with Permatex gasket shellac.

 

Here is the copper form a gasket I used

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Good job! The Copper Spray-a-Gasket is popular for cylinder head gaskets...

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My E brake drum looked like it was in perfect condition until I hit it with the blaster and found a crack...more money to spend

 

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Again, this E-brake drum could be fixed with either Weld Mold 26C high tensile brazing rod (after V-ing or round carbide tip grinding to the root of the crack) or actual TIG cast iron welding with Weld Mold Company's 700 and 750 filler rod. 

 

You found that used parts were cheaper than this kind of repair in your earlier need, perhaps you'll find a "good used" drum...If welded or brazed, the drum will require re-surfacing and truing, which may be the case even with a used replacement drum.

 

Moses

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Got the trans. rebuilt and mated with the transfer case again. Shifts great.

 

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Destroyed 2 of these shift rail plugs when I took apart shift housing.

 

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Not sure where to get replacements

 

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I looked at several vintage Jeep sources, you likely did, too.  Surprised not to find these tin caps, they were available years ago.  Checked the Crown catalog, a primary supplier to others, no listing.

 

Try a call to Jon Compton at Border Parts, Spring Valley, CA.  Jon has nearly a half-century of experience with vintage Jeep parts.  If anyone has these caps, Jon would.  Otherwise, Jon will help network to a source.

 

Border Parts' contact information:

 

Border Parts, Jon Compton, Owner

3875 Bancroft Dr, Spring Valley, CA 91977
(619) 461-0171

 

Please share my regards with Jon...

 

P.S.:  I-H also used the T90/T86 transmissions in the earlier Scout models.  Another possible parts source.

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