7 posts in this topic

Toyota entered the U.S. truck market with the Stout pickup in the mid-'sixties, a truck with an identity crisis...U.S. trucks were large and mostly V-8 powered, and the Stout limped into the picture with a scaled down chassis and four-cylinder engine. Great for a 2nd or 3rd World hauler, ill-suited for the recently completed, high speed interstate highway system in America. The Stout was remarkably well-built, truly a benchmark for Toyota. In the U.S.A., the Stout's largest success is its current collectibility as an iconic, cult classic—like many of the Japanese motorcycles from that era.

 

Then the first Energy Crisis hit, and fuel efficient trucks were in short supply. Ford rapidly turned to Mazda's Courier, G.M. partnered with Isuzu's Chevrolet LUV and Chrysler turned to Mitsubishi. Toyota simply pressed sales of its rugged Hi-Lux pickup.

 

That lightweight, 4-cylinder Hi-Lux model became legendary in short order. Toyota mini-trucks, especially after the 1979 introduction of the 4WD models with beam front and rear axles, established themselves as the most reliable, durable, longest lasting and certainly fuel efficient trucks in the industry. Earning a cult following, modified 1979-85 Toyota 20R and 22R/RE powered 4x4 trucks still ply the Rubicon Trail, demonstrating the worth of these scale versions of the FJ Land Cruisers! It was quite natural to include these Toyota trucks in my Toyota Truck & Land Cruiser Owner's Bible (Bentley Publshers)!

 

The 4Runner launched on the mini-truck platform. I was working for Rose Toyota at San Diego when it did. By the mid-'eighties, the heftier 4Runner and consumer demand for performance encouraged Toyota's first V-6 offering. The mini-truck and 4Runner put on weight and size, now possible with the added power.

 

     Note: A tribute to the indestructible nature of the inline four-cylinder 22R engine design: its ability to lug around a mid-'eighties phenomenon, the aftermarket Toyota camper/motorhome that required dual rear wheels! The remaining camper/motorhomes are still seen crawling up grades in the U.S.A. This is a remarkable testament, tribute to one of the best engine designs, especially for its size, in automotive history.

 

Toyota has never rushed to market with a model, especially within its truck lines. The Tacoma eventually replaced the mini-pickup, offering modern powertrains, body styling, improved ergonomics and chassis/handling. However, a full-size V-8 contender remained a consumer wish-thought in the U.S. and other Toyota markets. Finally, the Tundra came to life as Toyota would have it: a solid, reliable and rugged pickup—just what buyers expect from Toyota!

 

This forum is a celebration of all things "Toyota truck". From technology and projects to sharing experiences and restoration tips, Toyota owners have one distinct thing in common—valuing Toyota trucks!—Moses Ludel

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Hi everyone,  

I am about to embark in the task of replacing the timing chain aluminum housing, and every other component related. It all started with an oil leak, which according to my mechanic is caused by chain slack having damaged the cover. No coolant mixing with oil, just an unexplained leak. Upon starting, the engine had been making a sort of rattle that quickly faded away as oil pressure built. 

So, now that the problem has been identified, parts bought and most of the "in the way parts" removed I am about ready to start removing the chain cover. My mechanic didn't want to do the job...guessing he is wealthy enough to turn away time consuming jobs.  I need to find a good video or book showing how to do all this disassembling and reassembling, hopefully someone here knows of a link or source. The truck is a 1993 4x4 deluxe Pickup. I also like to check and clean up the oil pan and pump filtering for any debris before reinstalling, was told I needed to remove the front axle. I am not a mechanic, but do have access to tools and know how to use them. I have done brakes, replaced struts and most steering components both on 1985 Honda and 1997 4Runner. Any tips related to the task at hand would be welcomed. Thanks, Jay 

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Jay, you're smart to use an official Toyota factory service manual if you can find one, otherwise an aftermarket shop manual with step-by-step details would work for this task.  If your truck has the 3VZ 3.0L V-6 engine, it uses a timing belt.  While damage to a timing cover is prevalent with a loose chain in a chain drive camshaft engine, this is far less likely with a belt drive type.

As for an engine rattle on start-up, this could be lower end bearings or loose pistons if you have a timing belt and not a chain.  Please share more details on your engine type, the leak area and the noise.  A short video with audio would be very helpful.  We'll try to pinpoint the engine startup noise and identify the leak source.

If you would please start a new topic on this subject within this forum section, I will watch for your update and reply.

Thanks,

Moses

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Thanks Moses. The 1993 22RE equipped pickup was already inspected by a mechanic and diagnosed accordingly, the shop simply didn't "have the time" to dedicate to the task, as these days they rather make a quick buck by repairing collisions paid for by insurance companies, this statement from the mouth of the owner. So it's up to me to do the fixing. Following some online advice, I purchased  Toyota Truck and Land Cruiser Owner's Bible recommended somewhere by a few mechanics, have also a Chilton guide for mechanical works on this model. After having removed radiator, belts, air conditioner compressor, water pump and other stuff. What remains is the pulley, which requires the use of a puller I don't happen to own. I am not familiar with the kind of puller Iwould need to tackle this task, so here open to advice or suggestions. Once that accomplished will be ready to expose the timing chain internals.

 

 

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Hi, Jay...The 22R-E is a proven four-cylinder OHC engine, derivative of the famous 20R.  This is a great engine and practical learning ground.  Basic and accessible, the 22R-E timing cover project has been done infinite times due to wear of the timing chain, the tensioner, guides and the cover. For a thorough job, replace the tensioner and guides, the chain and the cover.  

The Toyota Truck and Land Cruiser Owner's Bible is familiar, I wrote it.  (Note the author on the spine, cover and title page.)  This is more an orientation to these vehicles.  You do need a companion shop manual for hands-on work like your timing cover replacement.  Enjoy the book!

The Chilton guide should be sufficient for your task at hand.  My publisher (Bentley Publishers), also did a repair manual that covers your vehicle, as did Haynes and John Muir.  If the Chilton book seems detailed and accurate, go for it.

As for the crankshaft pulley puller, I have the factory manuals (official Toyota), and they recommend tools common in the aftermarket.  You want a "harmonic balancer" puller, not a steering wheel puller.  The pulley is often quite stiff on the crankshaft.  Here is one example, pullers are available from a variety of sources.  Note that this tool also eases installation of the pulley, we can talk about inexpensive improvisation methods, I've done my share:

https://m.summitracing.com/parts/sum-g1023-1

Make sure the puller set has metric hardware to match your pulley's threads.  Worse case, you can get 8.8 or higher metric bolts that match.

Glad to comment and be a sounding board for your project.  We want this to be a success story! 

Moses

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Well Moses thank you so much for all the tips and suggestions. Started viewing a few YouTube vids done by a few guys, some showing incorrect ways, but at least you get the idea about what you are getting into. Also ordered a 1/2 breaker bar and the pulley puller set you recommended. Found a posting by 4Crawler.com uploaded in 2002 with a detailed step by step instructional which I downloaded as a PDF on my iPad, only problem is the technical wording, so time to bush up on my engine parts nomenclature skills. I feel more confident about getting it done right, hope to start as soon as tools arrive. Jay 

P.S. I have not yet received the softcover book you wrote, so wasn't aware it was redacted by you, that's great to know.

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You're on the right track, Jay...I like your approach.  We'll make this a success story!

Let us know how the puller works...

Moses

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