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2005 Grand Cherokee Front Lower Ball Joint Replacement


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#1 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 12:42 PM

This is one i cant seem to get a direct, positive, and useful answer on. I am working on a 2005 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo AWD that snapped the lug studs while driving and then subsequently destroyed the front ball joint. I have the new ball joint, and it looks to be a press in, but i cant tell if it presses out from the top of the A-arm or the bottom.

 

Because everything in the front is aluminum, i dont want to try and press it the wrong way and break anything. There is a lip on the bottom of the ball joint, but at the top it has two tabs folded over the A-arm, so im not sure if i am supposed to push the tabs back in and then press it out from the top or not.



#2 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 02:59 PM

The best way to illustrate this lower ball joint removal is with shop photos.  These will help you determine the tools and objectives for this project—and whether you want to tackle it!

 

Attached File  2005 Grand Lower Ball Joint (1).jpg   32.92KB   2 downloads Attached File  2005 Grand Lower Ball Joint (2).jpg   53.82KB   0 downloads Attached File  2005 Grand Lower Ball Joint (3).jpg   45.54KB   0 downloads Attached File  2005 Grand Lower Ball Joint (4).jpg   39.05KB   0 downloads

These are the "REMOVAL" illustrations. 

 

Attached File  2005 Grand Lower Ball Joint (5).jpg   42.85KB   0 downloads

This is the installation illustration.

 

Here are the steps involved:

 

REMOVAL

  1. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
  2. Remove the brake caliper and rotor.
  3. Disconnect the tie rod (2) from the steering knuckle (4) using special tool C-3894-A (1).
  4. Separate the upper ball joint (2) from the knuckle (3) using special tool 8677 (1)
  5. Separate the lower ball joint (3) from the steering knuckle (1) using special tool 8677 (2).
  6. Remove the steering knuckle.
  7. Remove the clevis bracket and move the half shaft to the side and support the half shaft out of the way 4X4 only.

NOTE: Extreme pressure lubrication must be used on the threaded portions of the tool. This will increase the longevity of the tool and insure proper operation during the removal and installation process.

  1. Press the ball joint from the lower control arm (3) using special tools C-4212-F (PRESS) (1), C–4212–3 (Driver) (2) and 9654–3 (Receiver) (4).

INSTALLATION and TOOLS REQUIRED

 

1 - C-4212-F PRESS

2 - 9654-2 RECEIVER

3 - LOWER CONTROL ARM

4 - BALL JOINT

5 - 9654-1 DRIVER

 

 

NOTE: Extreme pressure lubrication must be used on the threaded portions of the tool. This will increase the longevity of the tool and insure proper operation during the removal and installation process .

  1. Install the ball joint (4) into the control arm (3) and press in using special tools C-4212-F (press) (1), 9654–1 (Driver) (5) and 9654–2 (Receiver) (2).
  2. Stake the ball joint flange in four evenly spaced places around the ball joint flange, using a chisel and hammer.
  3. Remove the support for the half shaft and install into position, then install the clevis bracket. 4X4 only.
  4. Install the steering knuckle.
  5. Install the tie rod end into the steering knuckle.
  6. Install and tighten the half shaft nut to 251 N·m (185 ft. lbs.) (if equipped).
  7. Install the brake caliper and rotor.
  8. Check the vehicle ride height.
  9. Perform a wheel alignment.

These tools are OTC/Miller/SPX, and if you need more information, go to the Miller Tool listing for Chrysler tools.  Plug in these numbers in the Part Number search box.  Judge whether you can do the job based upon your tool access.

 

If you have more questions, I'm available...

 

Moses



#3 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:11 PM

Thank you, Moses. I knew i could count on you for the right way to do this. I have the haynes manual for the jeep, but their instructions for it werent too clear, the photos or diagrams are almost useless for the ball joint procedure.

 

I have a ball joint remover/installer set, which is similar to the 6289A Bosch set shown on the Miller tools site, but until i knew for sure how the ball joint came out, i didnt want to try and just press it out and break something else. I made the mistake once of pressing out the upper ball joint on a 1991 Dakota, and then found out it was a thread in type, and didnt want to make the same mistake again.



#4 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 03:53 PM

Let me know how this turns out, Biggman100...As for the Dakota pickup and other traditional Chrysler cars and trucks, many find the threaded A-arms and control arms strange. 

 

Strange or not, that's the OEM approach.  For some applications, the aftermarket replacement ball joint (typically the lower joint on many older Chrysler passenger cars) may be unthreaded and a "press-in" type.  This is good for one time, as flattening the original control arm threads may grip once but will not offer enough tension for a subsequent ball-joint change.  On the magazine's OTC hub puller coverage, I also show the correct "square" socket for the threaded Chrysler ball joints: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/HD-Video-Tool-How-to-Using-the-OTC-7394-Hub-Puller.html

 

Regarding service information, I have used the factory workshop and service manuals and the traditional professional trade manuals like Motors, Glenn's, Mitchell and Chilton (hardbound professional trade type.  I bought my first Motors manual in 1968, and that manual is now bookended by Motors passenger car and truck manuals covering 1926 to 1980.  I use these manuals for the forums constantly.

 

Research for each of my books relied on OEM shop manuals for first generation data and details.  My print library is stacked with OEM Jeep, G.M., Ford, Toyota and Harley-Davidson manuals.  I seldom work on either the XJ Cherokee or the Dodge Ram 3500 without first consulting the Mopar factory shop manual. 

 

CDs are now available (like my 2005 Ram/Mopar Truck Service Manual), and you can source used OEM manuals and even reprints in some cases.  With this said, I do find errors on rare occasions, when one year's data gets translated incorrectly or a torque figure is inaccurate.

 

For working on your Dakota, I would use the Mopar manual, as I do with my Ram.  Good backup for a Jeep, too.  An alternative for a shop or even a one-time home project is the Mopar official TechAuthority II subscriptions or short-term "rental" access.  Check out the website at: http://www.techauthority.com.

 

Moses



#5 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 04:07 PM

On the Dakota, when i pressed the upper ball joint out, i ended up having to replace the control arm, because it ruined the threads in the control arm, and the ball joint wouldnt thread back in. I saw the socket shown in the how-to you posted, and I posted a question in the Dodge truck section about that socket.

 

After seeing what you posted about how to remove the ball joint, i put my press on it, and didnt even have to put a lot of pressure on it, and the ball joint popped right out. I wont know until tomorrow as to how well the new one goes back in, because the parts store didnt have the new ball joint in stock, so it had to be ordered.



#6 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 06:00 PM

Since you pressed the joint out of the threads, this is different than unthreading the old joint and pressing a new one (non-thread type) into intact threads.  I'm suspect that the material removed will make the fit too loose.  Also, depending upon which control arm, the replacement joint may only be available as thread type.

 

If you want a preliminary sense for the fit, measure the I.D. of the control arm bore as accurately as you can with a caliper.  Then measure the new joint before putting your earned money on the parts counter.  Unless there is clear evidence that a press-in ball joint is large enough in diameter to make for a tight fit, I would get a "good used" or new control arm and the thread-in type ball joint if available.

 

Warning: One control arm requires a threaded type ball joint to prevent the steering knuckle from dislodging the ball-joint under load.  The other joint may have the option of an unthreaded replacement design.  Your parts supply, if they ordered the correct ball-joint(s), should be able to distinguish which joint can be unthreaded on your Dakota application. Again, an unthreaded new joint must fit through the control arm bore tightly!

 

Moses



#7 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 06:05 PM

The upper one is threaded, and the lower one is a standard press in on the 1988 to 1996 dakota, and after i pressed out the threaded ball joint on my 1991, i decided it was better to just find a good used upper control arm, instead of trying to just force a different ball joint in the ruined control arm.



#8 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 06:09 PM

If it's the upper joint, and it was originally threaded, the replacement must be threaded type...There's no choice here.  Time for a new or good used control arm...

 

Moses



#9 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 06:35 PM

Moses, we did it again, and got kind off topic by switching from one vehicle to another. The Dakota i was referring to in this, my old 1991 4x4, i owned back in 1997, and it was the first time i had ever done a ball joint on one of those trucks, and it was the last time i tried to press an upper one out of a Dakota. I agree though, if the control arm is threaded for the ball joint, and those threads get messed up in any way, the ONLY proper fix is to replace the control arm, no matter what vehicle it is on.



#10 Moses Ludel

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:27 PM

The 2005 Grand Cherokee is the one with the ball-joint currently on order?  Not the Dakota?  Got it...

 

When we change subjects or vehicle types, probably best to "Start a Topic" elsewhere...It's natural for us to digress, it's just confusing when we lose track of vehicles!

 

We'll work on this...

 

Moses



#11 biggman100

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:50 PM

Yes, the Jeep is the one in need of a ball joint. The Dakota was done years ago, and i originally used it as an example of why i didnt want to do anything with the Jeep until i knew the right way to do it, and then we got sidetracked.



#12 Moses Ludel

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 08:55 AM

We're all in the habit of running with a thread...Kind of fun at times, the discussion gets lively!  We'll take time to start new topics when we drift off-topic...I'm working on it!

 

Moses




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