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Found 57 results

  1. Hi! Moses, how are you? can i ask your advice regarding the tranny swap for my 242 1994 grand cherokee limited awd. i want the manual 5 speed , can do that ? can you please guide me what to do and the parts that in going to buy either a serviceable one , i know i can get it in ebay. my 42RE is going to end and theres no good repair shop here for the tranny 42 RE and it will cost me a big amount . Thank you. Mario Bedayo Philippines
  2. Moses, your website has been extremely useful for me while working on my 1989 Jeep YJ Wrangler 2.5L TBI engine. I have used it for testing just about everything on my jeep. I have replaced several items because of extremely high emissions. Today was the 4th pass through the test, and I finally passed my emissions test. I have replaced the ignition coil, ignition control module, spark plugs, cap and rotor and set the base timing, map sensor (because it did not hold vacuum), coolant temp sensor and my fuel injector. With all of that, my emissions finally were within spec. I am still having a loss of power issue with my jeep, and the only thing that helps is when I run Seafoam through the vacuum lines. It helps for about 2 days and then the same issue. Any ideas would be extremely helpful. One possible clue: The wide open throttle switch is in-op (cannot locate the part), and my throttle position sensor does not put out a signal if this helps any. Stinger87 (Josh)
  3. At random times I start my 1990 jeep wrangler tbi. It starts fine but its idle will go up to 3500 and stay there until I shut it off. But I go to restart it and it starts normal
  4. Hello all. Newby on this forum. I'm dealing with a '89 Wrangler with the 4.2 and an auto trans. The rig has about 165,000 miles and I don't believe there has been any work done to the 4.2. The original BBD stepper carburetor has been replaced with a non-stepper BBD, but all else appears factory. The owner has not been able to get the rig through emissions testing and has asked me to help. I am not overly familiar with the 4.2 and much of the information I have seen seems contradictory, so...Here is where I ask for your help. The base timing will change by merely revving the engine and letting it return to it's normal idle. In one instance the base timing was set at 6*BTDC, vacuum disconnected, and after reconnecting the vacuum and revving the engine the base timing had dropped to 2*ATDC, vacuum disconnected. The base timing has also advanced 8*-10* in a similar test. A static check shows the distributor and vacuum advance assemblies working as they should and the distributor is firmly clamped. The idle speed remains reasonably constant and the carb linkage is resting on the curb idle screw. I have not checked for timing chain wear and suspect this may be part of the problem. I also plan to remove the distributor and check the internals for wear etc. This rig has manifold vacuum to the distributor at all times. I have read where it should have ported vacuum. I have studied vacuum diagrams for this rig and haven't been able to positively identify the vacuum source. Any help or comments would be most appreciated. Thanks in advance. Ford Guy
  5. Recently, I've found time to catch up on some XJ Cherokee care. Our '99 had issues with the power window/door lock system, the A/C dash panel air flow and the "No Bus" gauge drop-off problem. Each of these problems is common to the XJ Cherokees and TJ Wranglers, making forums all over the internet. On our Cherokee, I worked through the troubleshooting and solutions for each. If your Jeep XJ Cherokee or TJ Wrangler is experiencing erratic dash panel air flow with the heater or A/C controls set to different positions, you'll want to check out this new article at the magazine: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/How-to-Jeep-XJ-Cherokee-Air-Conditioning-Fix.html. Another symptom to consider is the cruise control and the A/C and heater panel settings not working when you're climbing a grade with the Jeep. I made the Chrysler TSB #24-12-99 available as a PDF download. This is one cure, but it did not apply in our case... If your power windows, door locks and remote door lock control are not operating properly, you'll want to see my recent article: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/How-to-Jeep-Cherokee-Power-Window-and-Door-Lock-Switch-Replacement.html. This includes troubleshooting symptoms and the actual replacement of a door switch module. If your dash instruments suddenly drop-off to zero with the engine running or on the road, or if the "No Bus" signal appears at the instrument panel with erratic gauge activity, you may have the electrical connector issue that I address in the article: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/How-to-XJ-Cherokee-Erratic-Gauges-Fix.html. This how-to goes into detail about the problem, the parts involved and the fix, including soldering a new plug and wires into the dash panel circuit. I even included a PDF of the Chrysler/Jeep TSB #08-15-99 on this problem for both the Jeep XJ Cherokee and TJ Wrangler. Having troubles in these areas? Check out the three new articles at the magazine. Another issue is the rear door latch and having to press the outside door release button with great force to open the door. Possible remedy: There is a slot on the rear facing edge of the door that has an adjustable slide for the door button. Work the button and watch this lever move. You can loosen the Torx screw and move the lever/button adjuster to allow for a full throw of the outside handle button when you press the button. This and some white lithium spray lube at pivot points of the latch mechanisms can have your "defective" rear door latches functioning as new! Moses
  6. We had a pretty good weekend at the Moonshiners 4x4 swap meet in Puyallup. Picked up a new 12 circuit wiring harness made in the US of A by a company called Rebel Wiring over in Tennessee. Also found a new back seat, some very clean Buick V6 valve covers, and probably the best find of the weekend, a new adjustable roll-around shop stool for $5. Between that and building snowbike wheel kits I haven't spent much time working on the Jeep project. I did get the Spicer 18 assembled on Friday. It went together fairly easy with the help of my Jeep book. I also came to the conclusion that my magnetic base for my dial indicator is garbage. I reassembled the heads tonight, I kept it pretty mild with the porting work. Hopefully tomorrow I'll have time to cc the heads. Edited 7 hours ago by 53HiHood
  7. So I am in the process of a total restoration on my 67 CJ5 v6 225 and have reached the transmission rebuild. I found a damaged first/reverse sliding gear and cluster gear. Question is should I pay the high cost of the t86 gears ( cluster $ 220.00 / first gear $ 125.00 ) or do I find t-90 parts and convert it? The first gear is almost impossible to find, I only found one after a week of searching. I would have to find used T-90 parts to make it cost effective but then there are no guarantees I will spend less to convert than to just get the t-86 parts. I do not plan on abusing the jeep off road when done. Also can I get away with grinding the teeth of the first sliding gear ( bottom photo ) a bit to dress them up rather than replacing ? The other side of gear not shown is good. Thoughts ? Damaged parts:
  8. There you go, Moses! It's going to be my first attempt at an engine rebuild... Starting the tear down. This Jeep spent most of its driving life on a tow bar being towed to NY for the hunting season. The engine has very low actual miles on it.
  9. I have a 95 YJ 4 litre let's running extra rich. It will foul out the spark plugs with carbon fouling within a few minutes. Let me start at the beginning, I bought this Jeep running terrible. I was told it had a dead battery while jump starting they hooked up the cables backwards. I thought this was probably true due to the fact that both alternator fuses were blown. I drove it nine miles home and went through over 4 gallons of gas. Most of that ran out the tailpipe or was dumped into the crankcase. The number 5 and 6 injectors we're running fuel anytime the key was in the run position. I diagnose that problem to a burnt PCM. The PCM was sent out to a repair facility and upon return was installed and no start. the light on the dashboard would not even light up. I was told by the repair facility that that was their fault send it back and I would get a replacement. Upon installing the replacement PCM, the engine would start but still running very rich. The injectors no longer run when they're not supposed to. I started doing test procedures according to the Chrysler service manual. Cylinder leak down test shows all cylinders between 12 and 10% leakage. All cylinders 125 to 130 psi compression. Cam position sensor checks out ok crank sensor okay distributor cap rotor wires and plugs all new. timing ok per the book. ignition coil showed a low ohm reading on the primary side so I replaced it. spark is OK MAP sensor is OK idle air control solenoid was sticky so I replaced. Sprayed carburetor cleaner all around intake and didn't show any vacuum leaks. Manifold vacuum on my gauge reads low. About 5 inches at idle and up to 12 to 15 inches when rev up. Pulled the o2 sensor and plugged in a pressure gauge to do back pressure. Shows 1 pound pressure. Doesn't go up when engine revved so catalytic converter doesn't seem to be clogged. Running rich enough that in the three weeks I have been trying to figure this out, the new spark plugs were fouled enough to make hard starting. Since then I have installed fresh spark plugs. It will start and run but terribly rich. It acts like its not timed right, but all that is controlled through the PCM. Every check I do seems to point to the PCM still not being right. I am now one step away from doing the 5 gallons of gas and a match procedure. What in the heck am I missing?
  10. I have a cj7 that I am going install an AMC 360 with Howell injection, mild cam, and a little head work. My question is how well will the Borg warner t5 held up? Bad idea? Or is swapping to a np435 or nv4500 mandatory?
  11. Hello, Moses! Can you guide me on how to change ATF in my 1994 Jeep ZJ Grand Cherokee 4.0L 42RE transmission? How will I change fluid if I want to also change fluid in the torque converter? Can I do this thru the line going into the radiator? How many quarts do i need to change? Thank you... Mario Bedayo
  12. Moses, How are you? im going to ask you some question, i want to use the comp cam 252 is it possible to use the stock lifters push rod and springs? also what is the push rod height ? 9.639 is ok?, im just asking again your advice, i will follow your advice regarding to collapse the lifter first , pls. also guide how to tighten the rocker arm and the push rod.or is there any article or video that i can follow how to do it. your recommendation .... thanks. Regards to you Mario from the philippines.
  13. AMC/Jeep® always leaned forward in both car and utility vehicle designs. By the mid-'80s, the CJ needed a contemporary replacement, a vehicle with wider track for handling and a better highway ride package. The Wrangler emerged just as AMC sold to Chrysler, and the Wrangler and XJ Cherokee were the profit items Mopar wanted! The Wrangler four- and inline six era represents huge growth in the 4WD/SUV market overall, and there are huge numbers of enthusiasts, owners and buyers who can build a "community" at this forum! —Moses Ludel At left is an '87 YJ Wrangler, leaf springs articulating on the rocks! Middle is the Quadra-Coil™-suspension TJ Wrangler Rubicion edition, the engineering and off-road pinnacle of the Wrangler inline four- and six-cylinder era! At right, Moses Ludel's Jeep Owner's Bible, 3rd Edition, covers models through the Wrangler YJ and TJ...
  14. I've been a Jeep enthusiast since 1997. My first Jeep was a 1982 CJ8 Scrambler. One YJ and 4 TJs, the current one being a 2004 Rubicon with 52,000 original miles and trail modified. I have been experiencing the famous P0301 trouble code very intermittently unless it was cold outside, then it was steady. Rain or shine didn't seem to change anything. I live in Minnesota where winters are cold. Started with the obvious tune-up, copper plugs and the coil rail. Battery connections, grounds, injector cleaning and replacement, throttle body cleaning. The works. Could not isolate the misfire. Started chasing wires. No luck. Many live data scanners, no luck. Compression tests and leak down well within spec. Valves also seating and rotating well. Became very frustrating. Pulled the alternator, tested good. The battery tested good ( the first time). Wasn't sure what to do. Finally, the other morning it was -17 degrees F. The Jeep just didn't have the juice to start. Thought that was strange. Rain or shine it always started. Jumped it and went to auto parts store. Dead cell in battery. Thinking back first good freeze, we experienced this and had the same test done. I overlooked the issue and accepted its first passing test. No one on any of these forums makes mention of voltage or battery replacement or testing. Well I replaced the battery. Not a single misfire in a month. I've wasted countless hours diagnosing this misfire, and it ended up being my battery. Turns out they're pretty sensitive to low voltage. Thx for all the info on your site!
  15. I understand that many people get "noticeable" power gain by tuning the ignition timing on the Jeep 2.5L TBI four-cylinder engine. Some relocate the IAT in a cold place (cheap but small power gain) and others drilled a new position for the CPS to get 3-4 degrees variation. CPS relocation mod made me realize that timing can be tweaked by editing the signal going from cps to ignition module. I'm not into drilling the engine, so I called the italian AEB to get a controller (to be installed on the CPS line going to the ignition module) to adjust timing and they answered that is definitely doable, but they need a oscilloscope report of the CPS signal to give me a module that fits. I'll let you know if I get any further in this direction. In the meantime, do you know of any kit/ecu/module/processor designed for this purpose? Googling "adjust timing on yj" mostly returns a useless "you can't adjust timing by turning the distributor". Happy New Year! Claudio
  16. Hi 4WD Mechanix, I love the site and am so happy you are fielding questions from common folk like me! Your troubleshooting guide for the 2.5L TBI helped me turn my limping MJ into a reliable daily driver! Current set-up: 1987 MJ, 2.5L with AX-4 manual transmission, 2WD. Future: I want to convert to the multi-port FI. I have all the equipment, ECU, harness, manifold, etc., from a donor engine. Question: Do I need to change the RENIX flywheel to the MPFI flywheel? I have the MPFI flywheel on my work bench (the RENIX is in the truck), but whether the flywheel needs to be change will affect when I do the various upgrades. A flywheel change requires me pulling the engine. Thanks again!
  17. Well, progress has been slow due to work and family, but I spent a solid 6 hours on the CJ-7 project last night. I bought a new clutch linkage kit, as my lower and upper clutch rods were worn half way through, and the bellcrank was a mess. The new kit has an adjustable lower linkage rod with a ball joint instead of the old bent solid rod. And.....cue swearing. The 4.0 swap exhaust routing must be slightly different from stock (it's some kind of welded header instead of a cast iron manifold) because the ball and socket joint whacks the exhaust down tube solidly when the clutch pedal comes back to rest. After adjusting things for about an hour and trying the lower rod backwards, I conceded that it wasn't going to work and ordered a set of heim joint linkage rods to go with my nice new bellcrank and bushings. I have to say, the stock setup is a pretty questionable system. I guess maybe it gets points for simplicity, but for stoutness it is lacking. I know lots of folks have difficulty with the release lever jumping off the clutch fork, I wonder if there is a way to modify that to accept a ball and socket end for a positive mount instead of the old spring tension junk...
  18. Member Spdljohn began a brake and chassis frame-off restoration topic that has now expanded into discussion of the use of a shackle reversal kit on a 1976-86 Jeep CJ-5, CJ-7 or Scrambler/CJ-8. Below is the topic thread that member Spdljohn began...Join us and share your experience with the shackle reversal kit! Moses
  19. Is there a manual transmission that can handle an 800 horsepower racing Jeep 4.0L stroker engine? I need a 2- or 3-speed only transmission.
  20. By 1972, AMC/Jeep Corporation was in full swing, producing the new generation Jeep 4x4s! This era represents the legendary CJ models that grew the brand to new heights and set benchmarks for engineering, design and sales. Join others who own and appreciate this unique group of vehicles, the 1972-86 CJ-5, CJ-6, CJ-7, Scrambler/CJ-8 and third generation AMC/Jeep Jeepster/Commando models!—Moses Ludel Moses Ludel's second Jeep® CJ Rebuilder's Manual, covering 1972-86 AMC/Jeep® models. These years brought the Jeep CJ to the forefront, and consumers flocked to outdoor lifestyles and the popular sport of four-wheeling! An AMC/Jeep CJ does well both on- and off-highway, often with plenty of power, driving ease and comfort to spare!
  21. There has been a long thread of exchanges at Timmy960's topic on harsh shifting after rebuilding an AX15 transmission. The problem around 3rd/4th gear shift issues has a basis in the redesign of the synchronizer sleeve, bronze blocking rings and the third gear cog teeth for the sleeve engagement. Jason Logan and I had an exchange about this issue when he rebuilt his '99 TJ Wrangler unit. That exchange was just prior to the launch of the forums. For the benefit of all AX15 rebuilders, I am starting a new topic around this issue, beginning with the in-depth Q&A exchange that Jason Logan and I had...Since this exchange, Jason, Gary, Tim and I have been using the new forums to disseminate AX15 transmission rebuilding details...Here is the original exchange with Jason. I have highlighted important facts: Jason: Hello Moses! I have recently taken advantage of your detailed instruction on how to rebuild an AX15 manual transmission. I am currently working on an AX15 manual transmission from a 1999 jeep tj 4.0L that has never been rebuilt. I have a question regarding the stock 3rd and 4th synchro ring and the corresponding slider [sleeve]! The stock slider has an angle cut on one side and a straight cut on the other side. Also, the stock 3rd gear synchronizer is angle cut and the 4th synchronizer is straight cut. (I may have these backwards). Why is it that the dealer and aftermarket only show that both 3rd and 4th synchronizers are identical (either both are an angle cut or both are a straight cut). I ordered a 3rd and 4th synchronizer from Chrysler and they are identical (straight cut), and when I ordered a set from the aftermarket, the 3rd and 4th were also identical but with an angle cut! Should I use the Chrysler synchronizers (both straight cut), the aftermarket (both angle cut) or should I use one of each to replicate the stock setup as described above? I have put this rebuild on hold for weeks now trying to get some answers from many sources but nothing has been rock solid. I was hoping you could help me and give me some clarification on what is the best set up and why? Why does the slider [sleeve] have different cuts? Why do the replacement synchros have different cuts, different part numbers and configuration of teeth? Thanks for any information you can give me. Jason Logan These photos courtesy of Jason Logan ("JayDLogan"), forum member...Note the 3rd/4th gear sleeve and cog design for his 1999 TJ Wrangler AX15 transmission. Click on each photo to enlarge image. Moses: Jason, I would match synchronizers precisely to the originals and in their original locations. Measure the diameters of the rings, their angles and, most importantly, their fit against the synchronizer hubs in their correct positions. Make sure you face the synchronizer sleeve in the correct direction. Start with the original rings in correct relationship to the synchro hubs and sleeves. Note the overall “width” of the synchronizer assemblies, and then compare this with the aftermarket (new) synchros from both generic and Chrysler sources. The goal is to have synchro rings that will behave and fit just like the originals. Wear on the OEM rings is typically slight, perhaps a few thousandths, so you will know immediately if the parts are either wrong or in the wrong locations. AX15 synchro rings are not the same diameter, and the difference is slight, often confusing the assembly. My article provides details on the kind of “fit” and end plays you should achieve during assembly. Take your time, Jason, you’re already ahead of the game by questioning the parts to make sure of their fit and placement. The OEM layout and fit is your template. Match this and you will “restore” that AX15! Trust this helps…I’ll be at Moab through Thursday and out of communication. Let me know your findings in an Email. I will answer next Friday…Best of luck, I know you will do the right thing here… Moses Jason: Thank you very much for all of your information and help - my dilemma is - when I have ordered the synchro rings from Chrysler (they sent me 2 identical 'straight cut' synchro rings) and when i ordered from the aftermarket (they have sent me 2 identical 'angle cut' rings) but my original synchro rings have 'one of each' cut (one ring is a straight cut and the other ring is an angle cut). Although all synchro rings ordered are the same diameter, angles and fitment as my originals, I'm not sure if I should be using what Chrysler sent me (the 2 straight cut rings) or what the Aftermarket sent me (2 angle cut rings) - or should I be using one of each cut to match identically up to the original set up? I would have thought Chrysler would have sent me one of each (angle and straight cut synchro ring) based on the fact that my original rings are 'one of each' cut. And my second dilemma is - the number of teeth and location of the teeth on each ring ordered are not set up identically to my original configuration of teeth on my original rings - does that matter? I'm extremely grateful for your reply and value your expertise. Jason Logan Jason added these parts details: I found some other information, Moses! If you look at earlier years of the Jeep Wrangler 1997-1998 they have used part number 4897051AA (for both 3 & 4 synchro) or 4897052AA (for both 3&4) depending on the month the jeep was made. Part number 4897051AA is a synchro ring that has teeth that are angle cut and part number 4897052AA has teeth that are straight cut (shaped like a house). The jeep I am working on is a 1999 that calls for part number 4897052AA for both 3 and 4. It looks like at the factory, they have put part number 4897052AA for synchro 4 (near the input shaft) and 4897051AA for synchro 3 (near third gear). Very confusing! I also found, like I noted before in my second email, that the teeth of part number 4897052AA and 4897051AA are in a different configuration around the ring slightly than the originals as you can see in the pictures. I have purchased many 3 and 4 synchro rings but none of the teeth patterns match up! I had no problems matching up 1,2 and 5 synchros. I hope this helps you understand what I am up against! Thanks again! Jason Logan P.S I purchased part number 4897051AA today from Chrysler to clarify if it was angle cut and indeed it was! Moses: Hi, Jason, I’m just back from Moab, UT Jeep Safari…You sent great photos, this is all very interesting! Since the gear/ring in question is really 3rd gear, my belief is that Chrysler/Aisin discovered downshifting to 3rd problems and implemented a remedy. The angle cut would engage the shift sleeve differently, apparently allowing easier engagement on the downshift from 4th to 3rd. It would seem like either ring would work, as they each engage the sleeve troughs accurately (taking a straight-on view). The difference is that the angled ring would engage the sleeve with a different pressure and slight rotation of the ring. Just a guess, but this seems the only identifiable issue. Think about the third gear engagement: Shifting up, there is the lag in the shifter’s neutral gate and a “slower” engagement of 3rd gear. Shifting down, however, would be a direct, quick movement of the shift level and fork. Consequently, the sleeve would want to quickly rush over the brass ring teeth—without providing smooth or effective braking action at the gear hub. This would cause harsher gear engagement. Apparently, the slight angle makes the downshift to 3rd gear smoother, with better braking action and less risk of gear clash. Probably, either design would work if all drivers shifted up and down smoothly and without taxing the synchros. However, American drivers (and others with Jeep vehicles) want to affect a quick downshift to 3rd gear. The concern here, though, is to match the bronze rings with the updated synchronizer sleeve design. Does this make sense, considering the parts layout? The tooth spacing and offset on the rings has more to do with keeping the ring as close to square as it moves onto the gear hub. If nothing else, this is a testimonial to the precision design of Aisin transmissions, more like Euro types than U.S. gear products. The aim with a wedge ramp instead of arrow teeth is the shift “timing”, and that’s a precise consideration. This reflects the rest of the AX15 design quality and fitment. These are more complex units for a reason. I’m sure your build will be stellar, Jason! Let me know how this turns out. Regards, Moses Jason: Makes perfect sense Moses! Would it make sense to you to use the angle cut synchros for both sides of the slider even though the slider on one side is straight cut and the other is angle cut? I am still unsure if I should use both angle cut synchros, both straight cut synchros, or use one of each. The rebuild kit I purchased had two angle cut synchros, I am wondering if this is the upgrade? To me it is like rolling the dice on this decision! Thanks for all your input. Very much appreciated. Regards, Jason Photos courtesy of forum member Jason Logan...Note the OEM synchronizer design for this late version of the AX15—Mopar parts. Moses: I would follow the OEM approach if you’re sure the transmission is original, never before apart (which you believed from the start). The model year is late enough in the game for the synchro "solutions" to be in place…I would match the bronze rings and synchro sleeve carefully to the OEM layout. If this transmission shifted well for all of those miles, I would take this approach! As a final check, place the new synchro rings against the gear hubs to be sure the fit is aligned. You can put a light film of grease on the ring contact surface to read the fit. Wipe the grease away before assembly and coat the ring with a thin film of gear lube. Let me know how this all turns out, Jason… Best, Moses Jason: Thanks again Moses! I hope you had a successful trip to Moab, UT Jeep Safari. I have wanted to go for many years. Wish me luck on the AX15! Regards Jason Moses: Hi, Jason…Moab is breathtaking scenery, with contrast ranging from sandstone/slick rock to alpine peaks capped with snow this time of year, the Colorado River, arches and formations, all of it! I trust you’ll make it at some point, and if so, let me know. I do make the Moab Jeep Safari each year…Like Canada, we live at a “winter zone”, 4400 feet elevation near Reno. We look forward to winter’s end, and Moab Jeep Safari has become our annual end of winter/early spring gathering! You’re going to do a great job on this AX15! Follow the assembly steps faithfully, there are no shortcuts. When completed, you’ll have a smooth-shifting unit, as new, and that will be very gratifying! Let me know the outcome… I launched a message board today with a large number of forums at www.4WDmechanix.com/forums. It would be great to see your involvement if you have the time. Tech forums need detail-oriented members! It’s new, and I’d value your feedback about the forums you find interesting, the sign-up procedure, member validation and use. Best, Moses Note...Jason and I moved this conversation to the new forums at this point...When rebuilding an AX15 that has never been rebuilt before, lay out the parts as you take the unit apart, identify the synchronizer design for 3rd/4th gear, and match parts to the original design. There is a distinct difference between "earlier" AX15 and "late" AX15. The rebuild core in my magazine article and the A150 (Toyota version of the AX15) depicted at the Weber State University YouTube video (click for post topic threads containing the embedded video) are 1990-92 "early" AX15 design. Later model Jeep vehicles with the AX15 use a redesigned 3rd/4th synchronizer assembly...Rebuild accordingly, matching and using the right parts! Jason has added charts from an Aisin direct dealer that show the synchronizer applications for 1998-99 AX15 transmissions. Make sure you check your synchronizer rings and the synchro sleeve design for 3rd/4th gear. Install matching rings for your transmission. Be certain to install the synchro sleeve in the correct direction! ("House" or arrow shaped points match the 4th gear ring with house or arrow point teeth.) Here is an approximate application list with Aisin part numbers (not Jeep/Mopar): Click on image to enlarge...Thanks to Jason Logan for the chart!
  22. The magazine had the opportunity to test Pulstar® spark plugs in the 1999 Jeep XJ Cherokee 4.0L. These unique spark plugs received our extensive testing in the XJ Cherokee and the two Honda dirt motorcycles. The plugs work optimally with both gasoline and natural gas engines. The magazine article is available at: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/Testing-the-Enerpulse-Pulstar-Spark-Plugs.html. We will continue testing and discussing these spark plugs at the magazine and these forums! Here are our findings with the XJ Cherokee: 1999 Jeep XJ Cherokee 4x4 4.0L—This inline six-cylinder engine is nearly stock. The addition of a Borla header, Random Technologies' performance catalytic converter and the Hypertech 'Max Energy' program tuning are the only modifications. The vehicle's approximate curb weight of 3,800 pounds with a Warn front winch and an aftermarket ARB front bumper and Warn rear heavy duty bumper. The axles have 4.10:1 ring and pinions to compensate for the 33" diameter tires and a 6-inch long-arm suspension lift. Prior to testing with the Pulstar® spark plugs, this vehicle operated with Bosch spark plugs that burned well with a fully functional ignition and EFI/MPI system. There were no issues with ignition misfire or EFI fuel supply problems, and this engine has normal, uniform compression and cylinder seal. The change to Pulstar® plugs gapped to factory 0.035" was the only change made for this test. We waited for the first tank of fuel to burn through before making comparisons. At that point there were several distinct improvements: 1) Better tip-in throttle response at any road speed and under heavy acceleration. 2) Less throttle needed to sustain normal "cruise" road speeds. 3) Less downshifting on grades with cruise control applied. Acceleration improved with both forced and cruise control downshifts. 4) Distinct improvement in fuel efficiency; approximately one mile per gallon improvement (5.5%) under "city" and "highway" or interstate test conditions. 5) Starts immediate; this engine has always started well. Details and actual spark plug installation coverage can be seen in the HD video: Moses
  23. My 1987 Cherokee 4.0 liter is misfiring when started but when I have clutch depressed it runs fine. Does any one have any ideas? I think a bad TPS but don't want to throw money at something that won't fix it!
  24. This V-8 powered Jeep Grand Cherokee has a low-speed hesitation. I answered the owner's questions with engine and powertrain troubleshooting recommendations. The NV249 transfer case is also discussed: The information could prove helpful to Jeep ZJ Grand Cherokee owners and also Dodge Ram and Dakota owners with 5.2L V-8 powered trucks. Moses
  25. In this video discussion, I describe the symptoms of hydraulic clutch linkage leaks in 1987-95 Jeep YJ Wrangler models. Originally part of the Q&A Vlog at the magazine, the viewer's question refers to hard shifting and loss of hydraulic fluid. I share what causes these troubles in this how-to HD video on troubleshooting: Moses
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