Moses Ludel

Administrators
  • Content count

    2,719
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    56

2 Followers

About Moses Ludel

  • Rank
    Administrator
  • Birthday June 7

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.4WDmechanix.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Reno Area...Nevada
  • Interests
    Family, destination four-wheeling and dual-sport motorcycling, photography, videography, fly-fishing, anthropology, automotive mechanics and welding/metallurgy.

Recent Profile Visitors

2,797 profile views
  1. Nice progress here, William! I like your consideration for items like the shim pack adjustment when you eliminated the cut paper gasket. These gaskets have a notorious history of pounding out, shrinking, stretching and leaking. However, we do need to respect the clearances that gaskets create. With RTV sealant, you have a virtual "interference fit" between these parts that will not waver in service. Note: The most troublesome gasket on the early Spicer Model 18 transfer case was between the transmission and transfer case. This paper gasket took the torque, rocking, fore-and-aft thrust and every other kind of distortion until eventually it leaked...on every Willys-Kaiser Jeep 4x4 I've ever seen! Often, the bolts and lock washers would loosen from the cut gasket getting pounded. In the modern era of RTV sealant, OEMs have eliminated paper cut gaskets. You did that here, knowing Dana expected a clearance where the gasket resided. You compensated for that in your shim pack adjustment. I also like your prudent, strategic use of RTV sealant. This will flatten and spread over the areas that require sealing. You're building a "blueprinted" and tightly sealed Dana 300 that should run for a couple hundred thousand miles or more with the right lubricant. The Dana 300 is considered the best transfer case ever built for a light Jeep utility 4x4 model. You're assuring that level of service. Fantastic photos once more...Thanks! Moses
  2. I have a tip on how to remove a pilot bushing...Years ago, I was working as a truck fleet mechanic and had a clutch job underway. The pilot bushing was stubborn and would not come out of the crankshaft. An older, retired mechanic shared a solution that has served me well since: 1) Pack the crankshaft cavity and pilot bore with grease. 2) Use an old input gear or a steel rod of the same diameter as the pilot bearing I.D.; put on your safety goggles and drive the input gear (nose end) or steel rod into the pilot bore. You can use a sand filled large plastic hammer on the back end of the input gear or a short handled steel sledge on the steel rod's end. 3) The impact force and close fit turns the grease into a hydraulic ram. Grease drives the bushing out from its backside. This works especially well if the bushing has a larger O.D. If the bushing is thin-walled, the task is more difficult. On a caged needle bearing pilot, this may not work (grease slips past the needles and pressure drops), but it's worth a try. Moses
  3. Thomas...According to the Rock Auto listings, nearly all 2-1/2" front shoe 1210 models have 2-1/2" rear shoes. One listing suggested 3" rear. To be sure, I would remove a rear drum with the vehicle safely on axle stands. Check rear shoe width before ordering the parts... Moses
  4. 60Bubba...I'm not a fan of transfer case clocking (upward) for exactly the reasons you cite. The only excuse in my view is the need for extreme break-over angle clearance. Some do it, I wouldn't unless there is a clear necessity or reason. As for flat towing a Jeep 4x4, I have an alternative that has worked for me: Find a used car hauling trailer that has tandem axle brakes. You'll be much safer, the Jeep will not have a stressed steering system, and you won't be fussing with lighting and either 1) no brakes on the Jeep or 2) an elaborate hydraulic brake system that ties between your Nissan truck and the Jeep (if these hydraulic systems have not been outlawed by now)...I bought my open (wood) deck 7500# capacity car hauling trailer for $1500 in the mid-'nineties, and it has paid for itself ten times over. These "Texas/Oklahoma" trailers, mine happens to be a Parker, are everywhere—new or used...I'm just sayin'. I do have a tip on the pilot bushing removal and have added the comments in a topic under General Repairs. Years ago, I was working as a truck fleet mechanic and had a clutch job underway. The pilot bushing was stubborn and would not come out of the crankshaft. An older, retired mechanic shared a solution that has served me well since: 1) Pack the crankshaft cavity and pilot bore with grease. 2) Use an old input gear or a steel rod of the same diameter as the pilot bearing I.D.; put on your safety goggles and drive the input gear (nose end) or steel rod into the pilot bore. You can use a sand filled large plastic hammer on the back end of the input gear or a short handled steel sledge on the steel rod's end. 3) The impact force and close fit turns the grease into a hydraulic ram. Grease drives the bushing out from its backside. This works especially well if the bushing has a larger O.D. If the bushing is thin-walled, the task is more difficult. On a caged needle bearing pilot, this may not work (grease slips past the needles and pressure drops), but it's worth a try. Moses
  5. Thomas, if your LST shows the same ticket number for front and rear brakes, and if your front brakes are 2-1/2" width, the rear brakes should also be 2-1/2" width. There are also 3" listed, but that is 3" both front and rear. If you can take a rear drum off safely (on axle stands), I would confirm the rear brake shoe width before ordering new shoes. I looked at Rock Auto, they have a surprisingly good supply of '73 I-H 1210 brake shoe sets, and the majority of 2-1/2" front brakes have 2-1/2" rear brakes. Moses
  6. RareCJ8...There are lots of hose options if made from scratch. Many of the NAPA stores could make hoses and couplers from scratch, using Weatherhead fittings of every kind and popular fitting angle. (See a Weatherhead fittings catalog.) I took advantage of this at Yerington where the agricultural equipment makes the hand-built option practical. At Reno, there is Reno Hydraulic, they make hoses and fitted couplings for any kind of hydraulic application, popular for mining, construction, heavy equipment and heavy-duty automotive/trucks. They can make the right hose with couplers and fittings. As for pitman arms, I've seen recycling yards with barrels full of pitman arms, this is dense metal that gets saved for scrap. You might try some of the Reno/Sparks yards, even Pick-n-Pull, for ideas and a possible pitman arm solution. The spline size is fairly common, as you suggest, it's getting the length and outer tapered hole size for the tie-rod or draglink ball stud. Moses
  7. Sabueso...I thought this would be a differential problem, and it is. The broken spider gears likely ran through the ring-and-pinion. This project is common and should be a big help to others...Looking forward to your photos. You have an option now of changing the front and rear axle ring-and-pinion gear ratios, or you can just rebuild the Dana 35 rear axle with the same ratio as you have now. You will need a new ring-and-pinion gear set and bolts, new differential parts, a bearing kit plus a new crush sleeve and seals. (Time to replace the outer axle shaft seals, too.) This is usually available as a "package" in the aftermarket. You're right, this is a popular job! The Dana 35 axle is light duty and found in the YJ/TJ Wrangler and XJ Cherokee. Millions of these axles were built for Jeep vehicles. Let's start a new topic with your next post. A good working title would be "Rebuilding the Jeep YJ Wrangler Dana 35 Rear Axle"... Moses
  8. Thomas...There should be a VIN tag on the dashboard, riveted in place at the driver's side near the windshield. This will have the complete VIN number. So will the tag on the driver's door or door frame. Compare this with the LST number on your copy of the LST that came with the vehicle. Are you trying to get a vehicle title from the U.S. state that issued it? If you're trying to register the vehicle locally at your country, the official office should be willing to correct the minor error when they issue a title. The most accurate VIN should be on the dash tag, door tag and the stamped frame numbers. Stamped frame numbers should match the last five digits of your VIN. There is a guideline for the early and late production 1973 type IHC VIN numbers courtesy of OldIHC.org. You will find that information at https://oldihc.wordpress.com/2012/11/30/ih-serial-numbers-2/. See if the information is accurate for your vehicle. I am curious whether the I.D. at the dash and door tags matches the LST number. You can also check and compare the stamped number on the frame, which should match the VIN on the dash tag and door/sill tag. Moses
  9. Mario...You need axle shafts that are the correct length and spline count at each side. If you're thinking of an original equipment shaft like the XJ Cherokee uses, you need to compare the lengths and splines. I've never tried this conversion. You need to search further. You can search on the internet for aftermarket upgrade axle shafts that fit your Grand Cherokee and have cross-joints. I've used Superior Axle (no longer in business), there are others. It would actually be cheaper to get exchange CV-axle axle shafts to replace your OE shafts. Cardone and others market rebuilt CV-type axle shafts for less than $50 each, here's an example: http://www.partsgeek.com/6x3m9tv-jeep-grand-cherokee-axle-assembly.html?utm_source=shopzilla&utm_medium=pf&utm_content=dcs&utm_campaign=PartsGeek+ShopZilla&fp=pp&utm_term=Jeep+Axle+Assembly. Do any other members have experience with the ZJ Grand Cherokee axle shafts and converting to cross joints? Please advise Mario. Moses
  10. Jay...Your approach will work just right with the Permatex Spray-a-Gasket, and you don't want to mix that type of material with RTV sealant. The Spray-A-Gasket works well on paper/cut gaskets. RTV is used aftermarket and by OEs as the first and only application of sealant where applicable: differential covers, some timing covers and oil pans, thermostat housings, etc. This is very evident the first time you take the component apart and find "factory" RTV sealant and no paper/cut gasket. You want to stick with whatever was "OEM". Here's a good example why: A paper gasket has a given thickness, and in an item like your timing cover, you can consider this a "spacer". If you eliminate the cut gasket that was OE, and you use RTV sealant here, the result is a shift in the location of the timing cover. Though slight, this affects the alignment of the bolt holes at the oil pan-to-timing cover and elsewhere. The chain tensioner or other externally mounted items might also be impacted, depending upon the design and parts layout on a given engine type. RTV sealant on a torqued part is virtually an interference thickness except where surfaces are not flat. That's thinner than the paper/cut gaskets you have at the timing cover. Trust that helps...Follow the OE engineering, you can't go wrong! On another note, when considering the torque of bolts from a general chart and not the OE guidelines for your engine, be aware that charts are describing the bolt shank size, not the wrench size. When you see "10mm" on a chart, that means a 10mm bolt shank size. The wrench size is considerably larger. Always take the bolt's tensile strength into account. Automotive metric is typically 8.8, 9.8 or 12.9, each has different torque limits for various shank sizes. Using the correct grade (OEM equivalent) hardware, the torque setting you need is the OEM guideline like the chart you posted. Moses
  11. Should be just fine, Jay...As long as the gasket compressed evenly and has sealant on it, the gasket should seal at the new/lower torque. Glad you had the intuition to stop tightening! The gasket did not split, apparently; you would be able to see a split gasket from the water pump's edges... Moses
  12. Sabueso...Well, you'll need to remove the differential cover and drain the fluid. At that point you can tell what actually let go and why this issue has been plaguing your YJ Wrangler for a while. If you have Trac-Lok, I'd be betting on a differential case that has separated, perhaps loose bolts that finally severed. Otherwise, it could still be the differential or actual failure of the pinion shaft. More likely the differential... Post some photos (cell phone photos work) when you have the cover off and some sense for what broke. It would be wise to raise the vehicle safely off the ground and place safety stands under the rear axle housing before removing the cover. That way, you can easily rotate parts and do an inspection. Rebuilding a rear axle does require care and following the guidelines for setting up the pinion depth, bearing preloads and the ring-and-pinion backlash. You do need a professional level service manual for this work on your Dana 35 rear axle. The manual will discuss tools needed and the procedure. You can make an informed decision about whether you want to do the work yourself. I am willing to provide tips and share safety concerns if you perform the work. Glad you're okay and the vehicle did not lose control...Axles can be fixed. Moses
  13. 53HiHood...Helpful review of these products, objective, too! You never know until parts are in hand. Curious whether Honda steps up on the alleged peg mount issue. These issues do come up, there was an upgrade on the Honda XR650R peg hardware; we almost bought a 2001 GL1800 first year model only to find out later we were lucky we didn't, the frames had a breakage issue that result in a recall and an aftermarket local TIG welding fix. Guess this can happen to any manufacturer, and Honda is volume. I'm still a Red Rider devotee...I just keep track of the upgrades and recalls! Even with our wonderful Ram truck, every manufacturer has its recalls these days. Moses
  14. Thomas, this is a hydraulically actuated trailer brake controller. Today, controllers are electronic, and most new trucks come pre-wired for an electronic controller. When your 1973 I-H 1210 was built, a brake controller was aftermarket installed. This type of hydraulic aftermarket unit was popular. The condition of this controller is likely questionable. It hooks into the braking system at one end of the dual master cylinder. The brake piping looks somewhat crude. This was either dealership or aftermarket owner/shop installed. Moses
  15. itsbobbydean...You've put good thought into this conversion and your needs. The prototype vehicle, which has been in service for a while and is illustrated in the SEMA Show interview video at the magazine, has worked well. I'm in steady contact with Advance Adapters, they are a valued sponsor at the magazine and forums. We were talking about a 50-State emissions legal diesel swap into a Jeep CJ, YJ, TJ, XJ or ZJ and WJ for years, and recently this R2.8L Cummins came into play. It's a natural if you plan to keep your Jeep TJ Wrangler for a long time and can amortize the cost of the crate engine, adapters, additional parts and the installation labor. As for alternatives and necessary parts, at the magazine I cover the welding and cutting involved with replacing a 2.5L YJ or TJ Jeep engine with a 4.0L or 4.2L inline six. Here is the article: http://www.4wdmechanix.com/MIG-Welding?r=1. Making that conversion would be similar to the amount of work involved with the R2.8L Cummins diesel installation. If you want to keep your TJ Wrangler, it would be just as practical to do the diesel as the inline six conversion—if you can afford the Cummins crate engine package and the Advance Adapters pieces... As for additional parts, your AX5 transmission is likely too light for the diesel engine. Like a 4.0L six-cylinder swap, you want to consider the AX15 transmission, which Advance Adapters sells brand new. You need the AA engine/transmission adapters, clutch and linkage (could be in the kit), it's stated that a 6-cylinder radiator (new in your case, perhaps with a shroud and fan) will handle the diesel according to Cummins, the transfer case would be okay (NP/NV231), you'd need the usual exhaust system and fabrication work that accompanies any engine swap. Far more details should be available by the time of release, the aim of Cummins Repower/Advance Adapters is to make this a user friendly installation. Since Advance Adapters wants this to be a fairly easy conversion, many of the detail parts should come with the adapter package. Similarly, Cummins has made the crate engine "run ready" with the ECU/ECM, the fly-by-wire throttle, the power steering pump, a vacuum pump for your power brakes, the flywheel and a fuel pump on the engine. This may sound like a shoe-in, but any swap "package" is just a starting point. There are many details that creep up in any swap, wiring and other chores, though Cummins does furnish the main crate engine harness. As for cost, figures have not yet been released. You do need to stay in contact with Advance Adapters, the good news is that your TJ Wrangler is already on the prototype level as a candidate, and the predicted launch of the package was the first quarter 2017. We're well into that now, so the package described in the video interview at the magazine should be near ready for release, initially for the Jeep TJ Wrangler...We've been in discussion about an XJ Cherokee swap package prototype, using the magazine's 4x4 with the AW4 automatic transmission. That has been tentatively slated for early summer. Moses